With hundreds of programming languages out there, it can be hard to know where to begin and what to prioritize in learning computer programming. At Startup Institute, we’re big fans of Ruby on Rails(and teach it in both our part-time and full-time coding courses) because it allows web developers to build quickly, putting it in high demand in the can’t-stop-won’t-stop startup world. Of course, Python is easy to learn and has a strong community with ample resources. Meanwhile, college students get their toes wet in C++ and Java, which develop valuable theoretical understandings of the logic of code but use less intuitive syntax which makes them harder for aspiring web developers to learn.

So, which coding language should you learn? If you ask our community of instructors and alumni in the trenches of the tech ecosystem, many of them say JavaScript. From the mouths of experts, here’s why you should start your coding career by learning Javascript:

1) JavaScript is versatile:

Joseph Mainwaring, Software Engineer at HighGround, SI Chicago instructor.

Tom Benneche, Front-End Developer at MobileX Labs, SI Chicago alumnus and instructor

Edwin Castillo, SI Boston alumnus

 

2) JavaScript is a classic:

Adam Hasler, Product and UX Lead at GoodWorld and SI Boston alumnus and instructor

Edwin Castillo, SI Boston alumnus

Tom Benneche, Front-End Developer at MobileX Labs, SI Chicago alumnus and instructor

 

3) JavaScript makes debugging easy:

Darren Tseng, Front-End Developer at Elsen and SI Boston alumnus

 

4) JavaScript is in-demand:

Tom Benneche, Front-End Developer at MobileX Labs, SI Chicago alumnus and instructor

 

5) JavaScript is imperative:

Gabriel Martin, Freelance UI/UX Designer and SI Boston alumnus

 

And, some closing wisdom…

Bill Banks, UX Designer at HS2 Solutions and SI Chicago instructor

 

Learning JavaScript is relatively easy compared to other languages. As a noob hacker who’s eager to build, this means you won’t have to waste time poring over textbook best practices to understand the “why” before you get to roll up your sleeves and actually create. Because you can find plenty of ready-to-use scripts and resources online, there’s plenty of support to propel your learning (though you should be mindful to learn JavaScript properly, per Banks’ advice above). The language is established, but high-growth companies are in hot pursuit of candidates with JavaScript skills.

This article originally appeared on Startup Institute

Contact us at editors@time.com.

SPONSORED FINANCIAL CONTENT

Read More From TIME

EDIT POST