February 5, 2015 5:51 AM EST

LOVE IT

• For a limited time, McDonald’s is allowing randomly selected customers to pay with “lovin,'” a.k.a. calling friends and family to say “I love you.”

• “Let It Go” songwriters Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez have written an original tune for host Neil Patrick Harris to perform at the Oscars.

• Eddie Murphy is set to return to Saturday Night Live for the first time since 1984 for the show’s 40th-anniversary celebration.

• Disney will debut a TV show starring its first Latina princess in 2016. Her name: Elena of Avalor.

STYLE ICONS

The Ebony Fashion Fair, a roving couture event that ran from 1958 to 2009, made waves not just with its gowns but also with its models, all of whom were black. That legacy is being celebrated at the Milwaukee Art Museum, where fair staples from Marc Bohan (left), Valentino (middle), Pierre Balmain (right) and more are on view through May 3.

QUICK TALK

James Spader

The former Office star, 54, has gone dark as Raymond “Red” Reddington, the mastermind at the center of the FBI’s crime-fighting operations on The Blacklist (Thursdays on NBC).

–DANIEL D’ADDARIO

Your show’s winter premiere aired after the Super Bowl. Are you a big sports fan?

Baseball is the sport for me. I was a Red Sox fan. My father was a devoted Red Sox fan. When I’ve landed on a football game, I like to watch that, but … I really don’t watch a great deal of TV. I don’t have one here in New York.

So you don’t watch any Blacklist competition?

No. I don’t really need any help to keep focused on the job at hand–it’s so all consuming.

Red loves to wear bowler hats. Do you think he had any influence on Pharrell?

Who?

He’s a popular singer [who also loves to wear hats].

Uh, no. I wouldn’t have any perspective about that. I’ve worn hats for many, many years. It just is an eminently practical piece of clothing. Especially for this character who doesn’t have any hair.

You play a robot in the new Avengers sequel. Any favorite robots from pop culture past?

HAL. I certainly was very aware of HAL–2001: A Space Odyssey. Ian Holm played a robot in Alien. But you didn’t know he was a robot until near the end. I don’t know if I can think of any others. Oh! Lost in Space!

VERBATIM

‘When did Nickelodeon take over halftime?’

ANDERSON COOPER, CNN anchor, in a tweet posted during Katy Perry’s Super Bowl show, which featured dancing sharks and palm trees

THE DIGITS

54%

Proportion of emoji-using singles who had sex in 2014, compared with 31% of singles who abstain from emoji use, according to a new study from Match.com

MAKING A SCENE

As a founding father of Surrealist art, Joan Miró didn’t care much for the status quo, reportedly declaring an “assassination of painting” traditionally in 1927. That mind-set spawned hundreds of beautifully chaotic pieces, including 1925’s Carnaval d’Arlequin, right, one of 75 famous works on display at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, N.Y., through June 1.

ROUNDUP

Proprietary Phrases

Taylor Swift’s recent applications to trademark her own words–including 1989 song lyrics “‘Cause we never go out of style” and “this sick beat”–were certainly controversial. (According to the Internet, Swift is equal parts “savvy” and “sinister.”) But will they be successful? Here’s a look at how other high-profile attempts have fared.

RACHEL ZOE

‘I DIE.’

The celebrity stylist filed an application to trademark her catchphrase in late 2008 and may well have gotten her wish–but never followed through.

PARIS HILTON

‘THAT’S HOT.’

The heiress trademarked her Simple Life catchphrase in 2004 and sued Hallmark in 2007 for using it on a card (alongside her likeness).

DONALD TRUMP

‘YOU’RE FIRED.’

Following the success of The Apprentice in 2004, Trump trademarked the two famous words that finished each episode.

SNOOKI

‘SNOOKI’

The Jersey Shore star initially met resistance when she tried to trademark her name–there was already a trademark for Snooky the Cat, star of a children’s book–but eventually got the rights to use it on shoes, handbags and more.

RYAN LOCHTE

‘JEAH!’

The Olympic swimmer filed an application in 2012 to trademark his bizarre catchphrase (which means “like, almost, like, everything”); it’s still pending.

LEAVE IT

• A French court ruled that parents could not name their baby Nutella, because it would be “contrary to the child’s interest.”

• A new video game called Höme Improvisåtion allows users to virtually assemble Ikea furniture.

• Americans are expected to spend $703 million on their pets this Valentine’s Day.

• Retired wrestler Mick Foley was kicked out of a Philadelphia eating contest for hiding chicken wings in his fanny pack.

FOR TIME’S COMPLETE TV, FILM AND MUSIC COVERAGE, VISIT time.com/entertainment

This appears in the February 16, 2015 issue of TIME.

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