Anita, 19, was forced by her father to leave school and marry when she was 16-years-old. When Anita and her mother objected to the marriage, her father became angry and beat both of them, stating that he had already accepted dowry for the marriage. Moshi, Tanzania. Aug. 19, 2014.
From a Human Rights Watch feature: Child Marriage in Tanzania. Anita, 19, was forced by her father to leave school and marry when she was 16-years-old. When Anita and her mother objected to the marriage, her father became angry and beat both of them, stating that he had already accepted dowry for the marriage. Moshi, Tanzania. Aug. 19, 2014.Marcus Bleasdale—VII for Human Right Watch
Anita, 19, was forced by her father to leave school and marry when she was 16-years-old. When Anita and her mother objected to the marriage, her father became angry and beat both of them, stating that he had already accepted dowry for the marriage. Moshi, Tanzania. Aug. 19, 2014.
TOMORROW THERE WILL BE APRICOTS:2014, M, 15, (previously pictured w her sister) stands alone in the niqab she recently started wearing. Her 17 year old sister has just married, leaving her alone in the house with her widowed mother and four siblings. (they live in a "martyrs wive" building). The marriage proposals are already coming to her. She had dreamt of finishing high school and becoming a teacher. She says that while early marriage was common in Deraa, at least girls were allowed by their families to walk freely in their community and go to school. Here, she feels she is slowly dying indoors, day in and day out.Their mother is fairly conservative, and does not mind the rules of the "martyrs wives building". She says the are only worried about our safety and reputation and we are grateful for that. The Syrian ÒWives of MartyrsÓ are struggling to find a sense of normalcy in the dusty Jordanian border town of Ramtha, painfully close to the home and life they once had in Deraa. The burdens of violence are present in their scant belongings, heavy mementos to remind themselves of those they lost in the war. Digital era lockets: cherished cell phone images of dead fathers, husbands, and brothers lost to SyriaÕs bloody uprising. ÒTomorrow there will be apricotsÓ is a popular proverb in the Levant, which means, ÒTomorrow never comes.Ó I first met many of these women in 2012 when their husbands and fathers were still alive, fighting for the FSA. The photos explore intimacies of everyday life of four families headed by wives who have lost their fighter husbands to the civil war. They show the quiet celebrations and daydreams of the wives and daughters of martyrs who now live in a building donated by a Qatari patron, despite traditions that frown upon displays of joy for single women, who are already caught in a vicious cycle of poverty, isolation, and anxiety.
The Ferrari assemly line inside the cittadella of Maranello, Modena- Italy. The New Assembly Line area from the pen of Jean Nouvel, where technological excellence and meticulous craftsmanship combine the 8 and 12-cylinder cars assembled in a light-filled, transparent space also enriched by green areas.
From a Human Rights Watch feature: Child Marriage in Tanzania. Anita, 19, was forced by her father to leave school and m
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Marcus Bleasdale—VII for Human Right Watch
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Photojournalism Daily: Nov. 4, 2014

Nov 04, 2014

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Marcus Bleasdale's work on child marriage in Tanzania, East Africa, where four out of 10 girls marry before their 18th birthday. The photographs, made on assignment for Human Rights Watch, draw attention to young girls and women who have been pressured or forced to marry as adolescents and undergo female genital mutilation. It's a blunt, compelling look at the hardships these girls face.

Marcus Bleasdale: Child Marriage in Tanzania (Human Right Watch)

Lynsey Addario: Amid Record Waves of Refugees, Italy Finding Limits to Its Compassion (National Geographic News) These photographs from Sicily show how the island has become the entry point for migrants trying to reach Europe by sea.

Tanya Habjouqa: Widows of Syrian ‘Freedom Fighters’ (The New York Times Lens) These pictures document the poverty and uncertainty faced by Syrian widows and their families in Jordan.

Luca Locatelli: Where Ferraris Are Born (Wired Raw File) Inside the famed car factory in Maranello, Italy.

Twelve Views on Israel (Le Monde) Pictures from a project, This Place, for which 12 international photographers were invited to document Israel. NB The post is in French. Also published on TIME LightBox in April 2014.

Photojournalism Links is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen, Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.

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