July 10, 2014 6:16 AM EDT

LOVE IT

• J.K. Rowling wrote a new short story describing the Harry Potter trio in their 30s. Accio nostalgia!

• ABC cast Georgina Haig will play a real-life version of Elsa from Frozen on Once Upon a Time. No word on if she can help your kids stop singing “Let It Go.”

• Country singer Dolly Parton has promised that if the owner is not found, she will adopt a dog named Dolly that was abandoned at the U.K.’s Glastonbury music festival.

• Hangovers are coming: an Australian company is launching a line of Game of Thrones–themed wines in 2015.

VERBATIM

‘The music industry is not dying … it’s just coming alive.’

TAYLOR SWIFT, in a Wall Street Journal op-ed arguing that in order to succeed, artists have to try harder to surprise their fans and make music that hits people “like an arrow through the heart”

MURRAY-GO-ROUND

Yes, this is a portrait of Bill Murray–made out of washi tape by Geraldine Mapa. San Francisco venue Public Works is betting that she’s not the only artist inspired by the actor: on Aug. 8, it will host a show of all-Murray art. The curators are accepting submissions through July 21.

THE DIGITS 61

Hot dogs scarfed down by competitive eater Joey Chestnut in the annual Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest in Brooklyn, N.Y., which he won for the eighth time; in a move that was frank-ly adorable, Chestnut proposed to his girlfriend just before the event

QUICK TALK

Zach Braff

Instead of ceding creative control of his new dramedy, Wish I Was Here, opening July 18, Zach Braff turned to the crowdfunding site Kickstarter to raise $3.1 million. Here, the 39-year-old actor talks to TIME.

–NOLAN FEENEY

If you hadn’t crowdfunded this movie, what parts would have had to change?

All, dude! Who’s making a movie about Jews looking for spirituality? Find me the studio that’s making that movie.

In the film, you play a struggling actor. What was your weirdest audition?

You know those “I feel like Chicken Tonight” commercials [from the early ’90s] where the characters are flapping their wings?

Go on.

That was the moment I decided I would no longer audition for commercials.

Mandy Patinkin plays your dad. Does he give fatherly advice in real life?

He’s not an old, sage rabbi like you’d want him to be. I’m doing Broadway, and he sent me a long email about how he makes it through eight shows a week, so he was my guru in that regard.

No Homeland spoilers?

I don’t even think they know.

You wrote this with your brother Adam. Do you get along?

We wouldn’t have gotten very far if we were like the brothers in the movie. But everyone can relate to both loving and having their family drive them f-cking crazy.

Your character has a go-to spot for epiphanies. Do you?

No, but I’ve definitely learned some things by doing drugs in the desert.

Like what?

I’ve learned not to tell what I’ve learned to TIME.

“ON MY RADAR

• HBO’s Veep

“I discovered it late. I was on a plane and was cracking up.”

• Candy Crush

“Those bastards are taking 99¢ from me on the hour.”

MAKING A SPLASH

There’s a lot more to street photography than people and sidewalks–not least because the genre can stray far from city centers, as in Garry Winogrand’s look at 1950s Coney Island, above. Throughout Winogrand’s career, the photographer captured the ethos of midcentury America by shooting its people in their natural environments. A retrospective of his work is on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City through Sept. 21.

ROUNDUP

Weirdest Stolen Movie Props

The Internet exploded on July 1 when an unknown thief absconded with an Amsterdam bench featured prominently in a romantic scene in the big-screen adaptation of John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars. (A week later, city officials confirmed it had been returned.) But it’s certainly not the first pop-cultural artifact to get pilfered.

KLINGON MASK FROM STAR TREK

The prop, along with more than 25 others from various Star Trek shows and movies, was stolen from a Hollywood studio in the late ’80s. A man was later arrested in connection with the theft.

THE GUN FROM THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN

The titular weapon from the 1974 James Bond film, worth at least $100,000, went missing in 2008 from a prop warehouse in England.

RUBY SLIPPERS FROM THE WIZARD OF OZ

A pair of Dorothy’s slippers (insured at $1 million) were lifted from a Minnesota museum in 2005. The theft has since inspired an in-the-works documentary titled Who Stole the Ruby Slippers?

THE 1964 CHEVELLE MALIBU FROM PULP FICTION

In 2013, police recovered the iconic cherry red car John Travolta’s character drove in Pulp Fiction–owned by director Quentin Tarantino–19 years after it went missing.

COSTUMES FROM SPIDER-MAN

Four Spidey suits disappeared in 2001 from the set of the superhero film starring Tobey Maguire. A $25,000 reward was offered, and three of the suits were eventually recovered.

LEAVE IT

• Thousands of gallons of Red Bull spilled onto a central Florida interstate after two tractor-trailers crashed into each other.

• A group of Christian rappers is claiming their 2008 track “Joyful Noise” has been “irreparably tarnished” by Katy Perry’s “Dark Horse,” which shares a pseudosimilar backbeat.

• Melissa McCarthy’s first film as a solo headliner, Tammy, netted $21.2 million on its U.S. opening weekend–well below expectations.

• Robin Thicke’s Twitter Q&A majorly backfired after users hijacked the #AskThicke hashtag to blast the singer for misogynistic lyrics.

FOR TIME’S COMPLETE TV, FILM AND MUSIC COVERAGE, VISIT time.com/entertainment

This appears in the July 21, 2014 issue of TIME.

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