TIME brazil

Sao Paulo Bans Foie Gras in Restaurants

Brazil Foie Gras Ban
M. Spencer Green—AP In this Aug. 9, 2006 file photo, a serving of salt-cured fresh foie gras with herbs is displayed at Chef Didier Durand's Cyrano's Bistrot and Wine Bar in Chicago.

Restaurants that don't abide by the new law will be fined

The Brazilian city Sao Paulo officially banned the production and sale of foie gras in restaurants on Friday.

Foie gras is a delicacy that’s made from the fatty liver of force-fed ducks and geese. The legislation was passed out of concern over the suffering the making of foie gras causes the animals.

“Foie gras is an appetizer for the wealthy. It does not benefit human health and to make it, the birds are submitted to a lot of suffering,” City Councilman Laercio Benko said, according to the Associated Press.

While animal rights advocates are pleased with the decision, some chefs in the city are reportedly upset, arguing that people shouldn’t be told how to eat.

The law will go into effect in 45 days so restaurants have time to adapt. Those that break the law will be fined.

Other countries have banned the production of foie gras, BBC reports, such as Germany, Italy and Argentina. In many of these places, however, it is not illegal for it to be sold.

TIME Tunisia

Tunisia Pledges Tough Security Measures After ISIS Claims Attack That Killed 39

TUNISIA-UNREST-TOURISM
Kenzo Tribouillard—AFP/Getty Images A member of the Tunisian security forces patrols the beach of the Riu Imperial Marhaba Hotel in Port el Kantaoui, on the outskirts of Sousse south of the capital Tunis, on June 27, 2015.

Thirty-nine people were killed, mostly tourists

(SOUSSE, Tunisia)—Tunisia’s prime minister on Saturday called for all citizens to work together to defeat terrorism as thousands of tourists prepared to leave the North African country in wake of its worst terrorist attack ever.

Tourists crowded into the airport at Hammamet near the coastal city of Sousse where a young man dressed in shorts on Friday pulled an assault rifle out of his beach umbrella and killed 39 people, mostly tourists.

“The fight against terrorism is a national responsibility,” said a visibly exhausted Habib Essid at a press conference in Tunis early Saturday. “We are at war against terrorism which represents a serious danger to national unity during this delicate period that the nation is going through.”

He announced a string of tough measures to fight extremism, including examining the funding of organizations suspected of promoting radicalism, closing some 80 mosques outside government control and declaring certain mountainous zones military areas.

He identified the shooter, who was killed by police after the attack, as Seifeddine Rezgui, a young student at Kairouan University. A tweet from the Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack and gave his jihadi pseudonym of Abu Yahya al-Qayrawani, according to the SITE intelligence group.

At the Imperial Marhaba Hotel where the attack took place, vans and buses were carrying away tourists on Saturday. While the hotel was not actually closing down, the tour operators had urged everyone to leave, the director said.

“We may have zero clients today but we will keep our staff,” said Mohammed Becheur, adding the 370-room hotel had been at 75 percent occupancy before the attack.

Tourism is a key part of Tunisia’s economy and had already fallen some 25 percent after a terrorist attack on the national museum in the capital Tunis that killed 22 people in March.

“It’s really sad but what can you do, for everyone, for the tourists, for the people who died, for their families,” said Belgian tourist Clause Besser, as he recovered in the hospital from a gunshot wound he received fleeing from the attacker. “For me, somehow, with a bullet in the leg, it’s not a catastrophe. For those who died or were injured for life, it’s something else.”

British travel companies Thomson and First Choice said they are flying back thousands of tourists from Tunisia Saturday and are cancelling all flights to the country in the coming week. Tourist flights from Ireland to Tunisia have continued in the wake of the attack, but travel agents are offering full refunds for those canceling.Slovakia has sent a plane to evacuate some 150 of its citizens who are currently in Tunisia, according to the Foreign Ministry and Scandinavian tour operators have stopped all flights to the North African country for the rest of the season.

“We felt a bit scared because Sousse isn’t that far away, it’s only 40-50 kilometers (25-30 miles) from where we stayed,” said Kathrin Scheider as she waited in line to check in to her flight out of the country at the Hammamet airport near Sousse. “We felt quite safe during the whole holiday, but as soon as we heard, we were quite happy to leave because you don’t feel that safe anymore if something happens like that.”

The Tunisian Ministry of Health has confirmed the nationalities of 10 of the 39 victims of the attack, including eight Britons, a Belgian and a German. The government of Ireland said an Irish nurse was also among those who were killed.

Relatives and family friends say Lorna Carty was fatally shot as she sunbathed. She and her husband, Declan, had received the holiday as a present to help Declan Carty relax following his recent heart surgery. Family friends speaking to the couple’s two children said Lorna Carty went ahead of her husband to the beach, where she suffered fatal gunshot wounds and was pronounced dead in hospital.

TIME Greece

Greece to Put Bailout Deal to a Popular Vote

Greeks will vote on the country's agreement with international creditors on July 5

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece’s prime minister has set a date of July 5 for a referendum on the country’s bailout deal with international creditors.

Alexis Tsipras made the announcement in a televised address to the Greek people early Saturday. It followed an emergency cabinet meeting.

Without an agreement on its international bailout, Greece faces the threat of running out of cash, defaulting on its loans and, possibly, leaving the euro currency.

Greece’s development minister is urging the nation to vote against the deal. Panayiotis Lafazanis says Greeks will answer “with a resounding no” in the vote.

Lafazanis spoke early Saturday, after an emergency cabinet meeting during which Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras announced his intention to call the referendum.

TIME World

See Gay Pride Parades From Around the World

Celebrations took place in June 2015 in countries across the globe, from Brazil to Germany

TIME Terrorism

Friday’s Three Terror Attacks Might Not Be Connected—and That’s Even Scarier

Tunisia hotel attack
Amine Ben Aziza—Reuters Police officers control the crowd, while surrounding a man suspected to be involved in opening fire on a beachside hotel in Sousse, Tunisia, as a woman reacts, on June 26, 2015.

A bloody assault in Tunisia, a decapitation in France and a suicide bombing in Kuwait are part of the horriying new normal of terrorism

Three separate terror attacks on the very same morning—perhaps 37 people rifled to death on a Tunisia beach, a businessman decapitated outside a gas factory in France and a Shi’ite mosque bombed in Kuwait City—sounds like more than a coincidence. Simultaneity has been a signature of al-Qaeda since Aug. 7, 1998, when the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania were hit by truck bombs within minutes of each other. And if counterterrorism analysts say the greater threat now appears to be ISIS, sure enough the Islamic State in Iraq and Greater Syria’s spokesman Abu Mohammed al-Adnani just this week issued a general call for attacks in an audio message:

Muslims, embark and hasten toward jihad. O mujahedeen everywhere, rush and go to make Ramadan a month of disasters for the infidels.

But while the extremist group claimed responsibility for the Kuwait bombing—a rare attack in a rich kingdom that has largely escaped terror—ISIS has so far said nothing about the other two. There’s a very real chance that the timing of the three attacks was indeed coincidental—though the reason is scarcely less alarming. The fact is there are so many terror attacks these days that three bad ones happening on the same morning falls well within the realm of statistical probabilities.

There were 13,463 terror attacks across the globe in 2014, according to the U.S. State Department. That factors out to an average of 1,122 a month, or about 37 a day, which means a terror attack roughly every 40 minutes, somewhere in the world. Half of them took place in Iraq, Pakistan and Afghanistan, where such atrocities have indeed grown so routine as to rarely qualify as international news. Syria, India and Nigeria together accounted for a bit better than a tenth of the sum. The rest were scattered around the globe, but not evenly. Of the 32,727 people killed, only 24 were Americans, or .07 percent of the total. Ten of those were in Afghanistan.

We are, moreover, in what has historically been the peak season for terror strikes, which past tallies show tend to rise in May, June and July. The holy month of Ramadan also factors in, with its associations of heightened piety. ISIS’s call to arms for Ramadan echoed similar summons from earlier insurgent groups in Iraq, where, as anyone who spent time in Baghdad over the last decade or so can attest, Fridays were seldom quiet.

If it seems like things are getting worse fast, they are. The number of attacks almost doubled from 2013 to 2014, as did the number fatalities. This had the perverse effect of making terror—which is meant to shock—actually less remarkable, as each attack dissolved into the generalized “background noise” of global news cycles.

ISIS has responded by amping up the horror. The group last year accounted for 17 percent of all terror strikes, yet nonetheless dominated the news by taking lives grotesquely and on video: Decapitating hostages, setting a Jordanian pilot alight in a cage, and in a new atrocity video released this week, killing captives by drowning them in a cage lowered into a pool; firing a rocket-propelled grenade at a car in which they are shackled; detonating explosive necklaces looped around their necks.

The group also wallows in mass killings, usually of Shi’ite Muslims and other groups the Sunni extremists of ISIS regard as apostates. Organized terror strikes by ISIS outside its theatre of military operations in Iraq and Syria remain infrequent, but when they come they do tend to be against Shi’ite targets, like the mosque in Kuwait City that ISIS dubbed “a gathering of apostates.” And as details emerge from rural France, where both suspects were taken alive, that attack may also turn out to have been inspired by, if not quite organized by ISIS. With a human head perched on a factory fence, the incident has the medieval flavor of the Islamic State.

The Tunisia attack, on a pair of beach hotels popular with European tourists also resulted in an arrest, of a man from the Tunisian city of Kairouan who had hidden a Kalashnikov in a beach umbrella. There were no immediate claims of responsibility, but both the targets and the setting— a moderate and democratic Arab nation friendly to the West—meant that attack is likeliest to hit closest to home for Americans. The dead included British, German and Belgian visitors, according to reports.

The U.S. remains at once quite safe and yet more vulnerable than it’s been in a decade, according to authorities. Officials explain the paradox by noting that the surge in the number of attacks worldwide includes few of the “spectacular” strikes such as bombings of civilian airlines, or other plots that the West in particular has hardened itself against. But officials expect more and more of the kind of attacks ISIS calls for — small-bore, lone-wolf, often impulsive attacks that may be impossible to detect in advance.

“In many ways I would say the threat streams now are higher than they’ve been since any time after Sept. 11,” Rep. Peter King, a New York Republican who serves on the House Intelligence subcommittee, tells TIME, speaking before Friday’s attacks. “ISIS has added a whole new dimension to it.”

The group’s power to inspire attacks, largely through its adept use of social media, has intelligence and counter-terrorism authorities scrambling to discern threats that could pop up anywhere a laptop or smart phone connects to the Internet. It’s a far more diffuse threat than Western countries faced from al-Qaeda, which organized specific plots through a rigid hierarchy, notes Jane Harman, formerly ranking Democrat on the Intelligence Subcommittee, now director of the Wilson Center in Washington. “A terror cell [now] is somebody on the web encountering some dangerous information,” Harman says. “That’s a terror cell.”

TIME Disease

South Korea Authorizes Prison Time for MERS Patients Who Break Quarantine

Quarantine tent in Seoul, South Korea
Chung Sung-Jun—2015 Getty Images Visitors wearing masks walk in front of a health advisory sign about the MERS virus at a quarantine tent for people who could be infected with the MERS virus at Seoul National University Hospital on June 2 in Seoul, South Korea.

The country is in the midst of the worst outbreak ever seen outside of Saudi Arabia

South Korea tightened quarantine restrictions on patients at risk of being infected with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome virus, declaring that those who defy orders or lie about their potential exposure are now subject to prison terms.

Health officials announced that violators could face up to two years in prison and a fine of 20 million won, or approximately $18,000. Currently, defying quarantine can result in a fine but not a jail sentence.

The new law, which grants greater authority to public health investigators, does not take effect for another six months. The latest tally for the disease reached 181 confirmed cases and 31 confirmed deaths since the outbreak began last month.

[New York Times]

TIME Netherlands

This Dutch City Plans to Give Residents a Universal ‘Basic Income’

CYCLING-FRA-NED-TDF2015
ROBIN VAN LONKHUIJSEN—AFP/Getty Images A man cycles past a cafe displaying Tour de France items for sale, ahead of the upcoming Tour de France cycling race, in downtown Utrecht on June 23, 2015.

Residents will receive money to cover living expenses with no strings attached

A city in the Netherlands is planning a large-scale experiment to see what happens when a society sets a standard, baseline income for all its citizens.

Utrecht is partnering with a local university to provide residents with a “basic income,” which is enough to cover living costs, The Independent reports. The idea is to see whether citizens dedicate more time to volunteering, studying and other forms of self and community improvement when they don’t have to worry about earning money to survive. People who participate in the experiment won’t have any restrictions placed on how they choose to spend the money they receive.

During the experiment, researchers and city officials will study the people who are offered a basic income as well as a control group who continues earning money in the traditional way. Utrecht officials hope to launch the experiment this summer and are in talks with other cities to expand the experiment to other locations as well.

[The Independent]

TIME Greece

Greece Refuses a Bailout Extension to Set Up a Weekend Cliffhanger

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras And German Chancellor Angela Merkel News Conference
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images What we have here is a failure to communicate ...

Tick, tock, tick, tock ...

Greece’s fate, and possibly the fate of Europe’s signature project on integration for the last 25 years, is about to be decided this weekend.

Hopes of a breakthrough on Friday were dashed after the Greek government rejected an offer from its creditors to extend the country’s current bailout deal for another five months if it agreed to further tax raises and spending cuts, largely in the area of pensions.

It’s now up to the Eurogroup — the Finance Ministers of the 19 Eurozone members — to thrash something out at a meeting on Saturday in Brussels. The talks have been moved up by two hours to start at 1400 local time (0800 ET), anticipating another marathon session of haggling over the fine points.

Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras left a two-day summit meeting with other European heads of government still thundering against “blackmails and ultimatums,” after what German Chancellor Angela Merkel described earlier as a “very generous offer.”

Under the offer, Greece would get extended access to some €15.5 billion to cover its budget spending and debt repayments. None of this represents additional money from the lenders, as some €8.7 billion is being repurposed after having been earmarked formerly for bank recapitalizations. The money would be more than enough to cover big debt repayments to the IMF and European Central Bank over the next month.

But there’s a problem: According to Reuters, the offer is based on a new paper prepared by technocrats who still refuse to acknowledge Greece’s key point: that its debt burden, at over 180% of gross domestic product, is unsustainable (the draft glosses over the debt/GDP trajectory to focus on “gross financing needs,” which it says are manageable.)

It got some support from Washington Friday, as even Treasury Secretary Jack Lew weighed in, saying that debt relief “must be part of the conversation.” But the Eurozone’s leaders, from Angela Merkel down, have all said this week that’s not an option until Athens has made the reforms it promised to make under the existing bailout.

If the past five years of Eurozone meetings is any guide, it’s almost certain that the Eurogroup will strike a deal of some kind in principle deep into Saturday night/Sunday morning.

The real crunch will come when the agreement is passed to parliaments for their approval — the most important vote being in Athens, where a large number of Tsipras’ own party have sworn to vote against any new measures, in line with their electoral mandate.

If the deal isn’t endorsed by lawmakers on Monday, Greece will default on Tuesday, a day when it has to pay €1.55 billion to the IMF (and a bit more in public-sector wages and pensions).

Tuesday is also the day when the current bailout agreement expires. At that point, if there is no deal to prolong it, the European Central Bank (according to its own rules) will be effectively forced to withdraw its lifeline to the Greek banking system.

It’s going to be an interesting weekend.

TIME energy

Oil Markets Await Iran Nuclear Talk Outcomes

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (L) talks with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, in Geneva, Switzerland on May 30, 2015.
Susan Walsh—AP U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (L) talks with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, in Geneva, Switzerland on May 30, 2015.

Outcomes on June 30 could either make or break the eventual return of Iranian oil

Oil prices have leveled off in recent weeks, but with the negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program bumping up against a deadline, that could change.

After crashing last year and then hitting several peaks and valleys, oil prices have traded within a relatively narrow range, with WTI bouncing around a bit above and below the $60 per barrel mark, and Brent staying near $64 per barrel. Of course, day-to-day there has been volatility as usual, but oil prices have been stable (relatively speaking) since the end of April. Even the OPEC meeting came and went without so much as a shrug from the oil markets.

But the deadline for the Iran negotiations – ostensibly set for June 30 – is only a week away and the outcome could have broad ramifications for the oil market, both in the immediate aftermath and over the long-term.

If a deal can be agreed to by both sides, Iran could bring a wave of oil production online. Western sanctions have knocked 1.2 million barrels per day offline since 2012. Although estimates vary, Iran might be able to bring 400,000 barrels per day online within a few months, perhaps as much as 700,000 barrels per day by the end of the year, growing to well over 1 million barrels per day sometime in 2016.

Also, Iran has somewhere around 40 million barrels of oil sitting in storage, a lot of which could essentially hit the market as soon as sanctions are lifted.

If news breaks that a deal is in hand, oil prices will sink on the expectation of this future volume, potentially dropping by $5 to $10 per barrel. And as Iran actually does ramp up output over time, and the rest of OPEC opts against cutting back to make room, global supplies will increase. That will keep a lid on future price gains and extend the current period of soft pricing.

Of course, supply and demand will have to balance out over time, and more Iranian crude will force a larger adjustment from U.S. shale, so U.S. oil production could see a deeper contraction.

There are reasons to believe a deal will actually be completed. Both western and Iranian officials hinted that they might be willing to go past the June 30 deadline if a deal is within reach. Such a willingness to extend the talks is itself an indication that the parties must be close to overcoming some of their disagreements. Also, Reuters reported that Israel has more or less come to recognize that a deal is likely. If one of the strongest opponents to negotiations with Iran is starting to come to terms with the inevitability of an agreement, that is pretty strong evidence that a final agreement could be in the works.

On the other hand, a deal is not inevitable. There have been very few updates on the state of negotiations, but just because Iran and the P5+1 nations reached a framework deal in April does not mean they can overcome the remaining outstanding differences, which also happen to be some of the thorniest.

Moreover, the tough tone from Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei this week does not bode well for the outcome. Khamenei laid out some of Iran’s “red lines” for negotiations in a TV broadcast on June 23, several conditions that appear out of step with U.S. demands. For example, Khamenei says that economic sanctions need to be lifted immediately upon signing a deal, not over time as the U.S. has proposed. Also, he ruled out a 10-year freeze on Iran’s nuclear research program. Furthermore, Khamenei stated his opposition to international inspections of Iran’s nuclear sites, a key western demand.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has expressed a willingness and desire to come to an agreement with the West, but the Supreme Leader is the one that is ultimately in charge. Khamenei’s hardline comments throw the outcome of the negotiations into doubt, just days before the deadline.

The collapse of nuclear talks could mean sanctions are not in fact removed, putting off the eventual return of Iranian crude oil.

We will know a lot more next week.

This article originally appeared on Oilprice.com.

More from Oilprice.com:

TIME LGBT

21 Other Countries Where Same-Sex Marriage Is Legal Nationwide

In light of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that legalized gay marriage nationwide, here is a list of other countries where same-sex couples can marry

The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Friday that all U.S. states must recognize same-sex marriages in a historic victory for LGBT rights.

In light of the decision, here is a list of 21 other countries where same-sex marriage is legal nationwide and the year it was approved (Mexico is not included because the country only allows same-sex marriage in certain jurisdictions):

The Netherlands (2000)

Belgium (2003)

Canada (2005)

Spain (2005)

South Africa (2006)

Norway (2009)

Sweden (2009)

Argentina (2010)

Iceland (2010)

Portugal (2010)

Denmark (2012)

Brazil (2013)

England and Wales (2013)

France (2013)

New Zealand (2013)

Uruguay (2013)

Luxembourg (2014)

Scotland (2014)

Finland: (signed 2015, effective 2017)

Ireland: (2015)

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