TIME Environment

Hundreds of Thousands Converge on New York to Demand Climate-Change Action

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, former Vice President Al Gore, and movie stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Edward Norton all attended

At the People’s Climate March in New York City on Sunday, a 4-ft.-tall walking banana was passionately articulating his feelings about wind turbines.

“They can make things run just by the wind,” said 9-year-old Danny Haemmerle, who dressed up as the yellow fruit to attend the march with his family. “And my parents don’t have to pay as much,” added his brother Eddie Haemmerle, 11, sporting a lime green wig.

The Haemmerles were joined by an estimated 400,000-strong crowd that flooded the streets of Manhattan to demand U.N. action on global warming — a showing that quadrupled expected attendance and made the march the largest climate protest in history and largest social demonstration of the past decade.

Timed to coincide with the U.N. summit on climate change, which meets this week to discuss an international carbon-emissions agreement, the demonstration was an international effort with 2,646 events in more than 150 countries, attended by hundreds of thousands more people.

Coalesced by several organizations, including Bill McKibben’s 350.org, the swarming crowds were there to pressure Obama and other leaders to make addressing climate change a top political priority. “Today, civil society acted at a scale that outdid even our own wildest expectations,” said May Boeve, executive director of 350.org, in a statement. “Tomorrow, we expect our political leaders to do the same.”

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon made an appearance, along with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, former Vice President Al Gore, and movie stars like Leonardo DiCaprio and Edward Norton. Nearly every labor union joined the march, including the Service Employees International Union, the largest union in the city. The march was supposed to start at 59th Street, but the throng of people stretched past 93rd Street, and there were so many marchers that it took the back of the line over two hours to start moving. The march was so well attended that organizers had to send a text at 5 p.m., asking marchers to leave because the route had filled to capacity.

People marched in clogs, dreadlocks, optimistic T-shirts, Native-American headdresses, bike helmets, feathered hats, Lorax costumes and biohazard suits. Babies wore diapers. One woman dressed as Charlie Chaplin and carried a sign depicting a blackened earth, with just the word “Oops.” And Danny Haemmerle wasn’t the only person dressed as a banana.

Zak Davidson, a 20-year-old junior at Tulane, iconoclastically wore a suit, explaining, “A lot of conservatives try to marginalize environmentalism as a fringe movement, like just people wearing hemp skirts. But I have a job offer in the government for when I graduate, and I’m going to continue fighting for climate change within the system.”

Davidson and 60 of his classmates drove 26 hours up from New Orleans to attend the march, and after it’s over, they’ll hop right back on the road and drive 26 hours again in order to make it to class on Tuesday.

“Moving to New Orleans really politicized me about climate change, since the Gulf Coast is predicted to have the worst sea-level rise,” said Davidson’s classmate, Emma Collin, 21. “It’s like being in Rome before the fall.”

The props at the Climate March were as colorful as the costumes: a massive model of the earth, along with hundreds of smaller balloons and beach balls; a giant, inflatable cow intended to highlight how the meat industry hurts the environment (a U.N. report found that animal agriculture accounts for 14.5% of greenhouse-gas emissions). People carried massive sunflower signs, sculptures of waves, goddess puppets and angel kites.

There was also a dinosaur, made of car parts and gas jugs, named BP-Rexosaurus, built by BikeBloc, a group dedicated to promoting bicycle transportation. “He’s here to tell us how to get pass fossil fuels before humans go extinct like dinosaurs,” explained Elissa Jiji, who was biking with the group. Other bikers dressed their bikes as swordfish, noting that swordfish bills often pierce oil pipelines. People chanted, “Exxon Mobile, BP, Shell, take your oil and go to hell!”

Often, people’s attire reflected the particular social issues within climate change to which they felt the closest.

A cohort of doctors marched in lab coats to protest the global health effects of climate change. “It’s one of the most important threats to world health, and it’s completely preventable,” said Dr. Erica Frank, who specializes in preventative medicine in British Columbia. “It would be irresponsible for us to do nothing.”

“Carbon pollution directly results in asthma, heart disease and cancer,” said Dr. Steve Auerbach, a New York City pediatrician who also marched in his lab coat. “From a micro and macro point of view, climate change is a global health issue.”

For demonstrator Favianna Rodriguez, climate change is inextricable from social issues like feminism and immigration policy. To protest a “culture of hypersexuality,” she marched topless, with yellow butterfly stickers over each nipple.

Rodriguez works with CultureStrike, an organization that supports the arts movement around immigration, but she helped design signs for the Climate March because she says climate change is an example of social inequality.

“The destruction we’re facing has been wrought under male leadership, and women and children are disproportionately affected,” she said. “Addressing climate change is going to require a very strong shift in leadership, and require us to include the vision of women and youth.”

The one thing that the whole crowd seemed to agree on, whether doctors, vegans, bike enthusiasts, hippies, feminists, students, Christians, toddlers, Native-Americans, farmers or grandparents: changing nothing about global environmental policy is a scary prospect.

“Inaction, dude,” said green-haired fine-arts student Joe George, when I asked him what was the scariest part about global warming. “I keep imagining where I live in Brooklyn, just under water. It’s horrifying. You can’t stop the Atlantic Ocean.”

TIME Scotland

Scotland Faces Challenge of Putting Referendum Behind It

Pro-independence supporters' Scottish flag seen in front pro-union activists in Glasgow's George Square, in Scotland, on Sept. 17, 2014, on the eve of Scotland's independence referendum.
Leon Neal—AFP/Getty Images Pro-independence supporters' Scottish flag seen in front of pro-union activists in Glasgow's George Square, in Scotland, on Sept. 17, 2014, on the eve of Scotland's independence referendum.

As a service of reconciliation is held in Edinburgh, community leaders and politicians urge for unity in Scotland after a divisive vote

Scotland’s decisive answer to one of the biggest questions in its history — the question of independence — has raised another, less easily addressed one: How does a divided nation move forward?

Since the country voted against splitting from the United Kingdom 55% to 45% on Sept. 18, politicians, community leaders and even Queen Elizabeth II have urged for reconciliation, fearing that the explosive issue might cause a lingering divide in Scotland.

While there were reports of clashes and nasty incidents between the two camps in the lead up to the vote, the fallout from the referendum campaigns had the potential to be much worse. With so much passion and political fire on either side, there’s no easy way for the two sides to reconcile opposing beliefs on what’s best for Scotland.

“I think there will be significant damage from this referendum,” says James Stirling, a 23-year-old trainee wealth management specialist in Edinburgh and a pro-union supporter. He says that the referendum debate split the country in two and “the [campaigning] passion is not going away. It was like fueling a fire.”

That fire has burned out of control at least once since the vote count. Glasgow, the largest city in Scotland and one of only two councils where pro-independence votes were in the majority, saw a pro-union rally turn violent on Friday. Reports and photos on social media depicted swathes of anti-independence supporters in George Square, a pro-independent Yes campaign hotspot before the referendum,draped in Union Jack flags and singing “Rule Britannia,” before fights and vandalism were reported. Six people were later arrested.

It was the kind of scene that many had hoped to avoid. The Church of Scotland planned a special service of reconciliation on Sunday at Edinburgh’s St. Giles’ Cathedral, led by Reverend John Chalmers, to address any wounds in the community. The service was also an opportunity to bring politicians on either side of the referendum debate together, Chalmers told TIME a few days before the service. He also noted that for those who had championed independence, the referendum loss was so pronounced, it was “almost a bereavement.” He hoped that the service would be a way to highlight that those on the other side of the issue could be a source of support in post-referendum Scotland.

Yet, though the service was attended by estimated 1,000 people, including many senior politicians, both First Minister Alex Salmond and his likely successor Nicola Sturgeon, the two most high-profile politicians behind the independence campaign, were no-shows.

Salmond himself has struggled to overcome his grievances. Having publicly accepted the results of the referendum, the fervent nationalist leader claimed Sunday that political leaders in Westminster had misled the people of Scotland with empty last-minute promises to give the country more powers. “It’s the people who were persuaded to vote No who were misled, who were gulled, who were tricked effectively,” he said. “They are the ones who are really angry.”

Rev. Chalmers, speaking before the service, said that those Scots still feeling angry or hurt must focus on the heritage and history that unites them. “The people of Scotland are on two sides of the same coin,” he says. But in order to move forward, he said that Scots must get on the same side and “get back to being Scotland.”

One canny entrepreneur believes he’s found one way for Scotland to do that. After spending months watching the debate unfold amongst his family and on social media, Edinburgh resident Stuart Ebdy, 32, realized that “no matter what happened in the referendum, half our country would be happy and the other half would be sad.” So he decided to make a Referendum Reconciliation Ale, an IPA specially made at a craft brewery in Scotland, that could be shared by Yes and No voters. He ordered 100 kegs, had special labels printed and began selling them online. “There’s only about a handful left,” he says, noting that many orders had been placed after the results were announced.

It doesn’t pay, however, to underestimate the Scottish ability to put aside grievances and simply “get on with it,” as Darren Crocker, a 28-year-old support worker in Edinburgh, puts it. “On paper it’s a divided nation,” he says. “But in real terms we’re fine.”

 

TIME Scotland

Scotland’s First Minister Says Voters Who Backed Union Were ‘Misled’

Scotland Decides - The Result Of the Scottish Referendum On Independence Is Announced
Matt Cardy—Getty Images First Minister Alex Salmond delivers a speech to supporters at Our Dynamic Earth on Sept. 19, 2014 in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Alex Salmond says "no" voters were wooed by empty promises from British Prime Minister David Cameron

First Minister of Scotland Alex Salmond says that those who voted “no” to an independent Scotland during last week’s referendum were “gulled,” “misled” and “tricked effectively” by last-minute promises from the United Kingdom.

British Prime Minister David Cameron and leaders of other political parties had agreed before the referendum to grant Scotland greater ability to act on its own to set tax, welfare and budget policies, London’s The Telegraph reports.

But Cameron said after the referendum that those changes would only happen “in tandem” with the exclusion of Scottish politicians from votes on matters that concern only England.

He also expressed hesitance about granting Scotland new powers without doing the same for Wales, Northern Ireland and England. “We have heard the voice of Scotland and now the millions of voices of England must be heard,” Cameron said on Friday.

Salmond accused Westminster leaders of “cavilling and reneging on commitments,” speaking to the BBC on Sunday. “They seem to be totally shameless in these matters,” he said.

“The Yes campaign aren’t surprised by this development. It’s the people who were persuaded to vote No who were misled, who were gulled, who were tricked effectively. They are the ones who are really angry.”

[Telegraph]

TIME Yemen

Yemen’s Prime Minister Resigns Amid Violence

Mohammed Salem Basindwa
Hassan Ammar—AP Yemeni Prime Minister Mohammed Salem Basindwa attends the third ministerial meeting of the friends of Yemen in the capital Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on May 23, 2012.

Mohammed Salem Bassindwa's resignation came as Shiite rebels took control of a key military base and Iman University in the capital city of Sanaa

SANAA, Yemen — Yemen’s prime minister resigned Sunday, the state news agency reported, following days of violence that left more than 140 dead and prompted thousands to flee their homes.

The official SABA news agency gave no details on the move by Mohammed Salem Bassindwa, and it was not immediately clear if his resignation had been accepted by the president.

Bassindwa took office shortly after former president Ali Abdullah Saleh was forced to step down in 2012. He has been in office since February 2012 and has since been the target of sharp criticism for his inability to deal with the country’s pressing problems.

The resignation came as Shiite rebels, known as Hawthis, took control of a key military base and Iman University on Sunday afternoon in the capital Sanaa, according to military officials. The university was seen as a bastion of Sunni hard-liners that is seen as a recruitment hub for militants.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to brief reporters. There were no official casualty figures from Sunday’s violence.

Hawthi rebels on Saturday captured the state television building. The Hawthis have in recent months routed their Islamist foes in a series of battles in areas north of Sanaa, and have in recent days consolidated and expanded their grip on areas just to the north of the capital.

Their foes have traditionally been Islamist militias allied with the government or the fundamentalist Islah party. The Hawthis have been pressing for a change of government and what they see as a fair share of power.

The Defense Ministry and the General Staff issued a joint statement calling on military units in Sanaa and nearby areas to remain at their posts, be on high alert and safeguard their weapons and equipment.

On Saturday, the U.N. envoy to Yemen, Jamal Benomar, had signaled that an agreement was reached to halt the violence, and that preparations are underway to sign the accord.

TIME Afghanistan

Afghanistan Finally Has a New President

AFGHANISTAN-ELECTION
Wakil Kohsar—AFP/Getty Images Afghan presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai signs a power-sharing agreement with unseen rival Abdullah Abdullah at the Presidential Palace in Kabul on Sept. 21, 2014.

Ghani Ahmadzai will serve as president of Afghanistan after signing a power-sharing deal with Abdullah Abdullah, who will become the country's chief executive

KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghanistan’s two presidential candidates signed a power-sharing deal on Sunday that makes one president and the other chief executive, ending months of political wrangling following a disputed runoff that threatened to plunge the country into turmoil and complicate the withdrawal of foreign troops.

Ending an election season that began with first-round ballots cast in April, the election commission named Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai as the winner and next president. But the commission pointedly did not release final vote totals amid suggestions that doing so could inflame tensions.

Ghani Ahmadzai and new Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah signed the national unity government deal as President Hamid Karzai — in power since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion ousted the Taliban — looked on. It took weeks of negotiations to form a power-sharing arrangement after accusations of fraud in the June runoff vote.

The candidates signed the deal at the presidential palace, then exchanged a hug and a handshake.

“I am very happy today that both of my brothers, Dr. Ashraf Ghani and Dr. Abdullah Abdullah, in an Afghan agreement for the benefit of this country, for the progress and development of this country, that they agreed on the structure affirming the new government of Afghanistan,” Karzai said after the signing.

The deal is a victory for U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, who first got the candidates to agree in principle to share power during a July visit to Afghanistan. Kerry returned to Kabul in August and has spent hours with the candidates, including in repeated phone calls, in an effort to seal the deal.

A White House statement lauded the two leaders, saying the agreement helps bring closure to Afghanistan’s political crisis.

“This agreement marks an important opportunity for unity and increased stability in Afghanistan. We continue to call on all Afghans — including political, religious, and civil society leaders — to support this agreement and to come together in calling for cooperation and calm,” the White House statement said.

Jan Kubis, the top U.N. official in Afghanistan, said the uncertainty of the past months took a heavy toll on Afghanistan’s security, economy and governance. NATO said in a statement that it hoped both leaders could move forward “in the spirit of genuine political partnership.”

The decision not to release vote totals underscores the fear of potential violence despite Sunday’s deal. One of Abdullah’s final demands was that the election commission not release the vote count because of the fraud he alleges took place.

Ahmad Yousuf Nouristani, chairman of the election commission, said the final ballot counts have been shared with both candidates and that the commission would announce the numbers publicly later.

A Ghani Ahmadzai supporter — Halim Fidai, a former governor — said Sunday that Kubish, the U.N. representative, told the commission not to release vote tallies. A U.N. official who insisted on anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to speak publicly said the allegation was not true and that the U.N. was only facilitating dialogue between the candidates and the election commission regarding the release of the results.

A senior U.S. official said the vote result is transparent but may be released slowly over fears of violence. The official insisted on anonymity because he was not authorized to be identified publicly.

Ghani Admadzai supporters and election commission reports circulating on social media said that the final vote gave Ghani Ahmadzai roughly 55 percent and Abdullah roughly 45 percent.

The four-page power sharing contract says the relationship between president and chief executive — a position akin to prime minister — must be defined by “partnership, collegiality, collaboration, and, most importantly, responsibility to the people of Afghanistan.”

It spells out the powers for the new chief executive position: participation with the president in bilateral meetings, carrying out administrative and executive affairs as determined by presidential decree, and parity in selection of key security and economic ministries.

The deal specifies that the president leads the Cabinet but that the chief executive manages the Cabinet’s implementation of government policies. The chief executive will also chair regular meetings of a council of ministers.

An inauguration ceremony to see Ghani Ahmadzai replace Karzai as president and swear in Abdullah as chief executive was expected within days. Abdullah’s spokesman Fazel Sancharaki said the event could be held on Sept. 29.

As talks dragged on, Abdullah’s mostly northern supporters had threatened to form a parallel government or react violently to any outright victory by Ghani Ahmadzai, a former finance minister and World Bank official whose power base is in the country’s south and east. Ghani Ahmadzai said he always maintained that ethnic politics in Afghanistan demand some sort of power sharing deal and not a winner-takes-all government.

Abdullah believes he won the first round of the election in April with more than 50 percent of the vote, which would have precluded a runoff. But the official results showed him winning about 45 percent of that vote in a crowded presidential field of 10.

He also believes he won a June runoff with Ghani Ahmadzai. But initial results totals showed Ghani Ahmadzai with about 56 percent of the vote. After the recount the election commission invalidated 1 million of the approximately 8.1 million cast in the runoff, according to the un-released vote counts, suggesting that fraud was indeed widespread.

Though the White House statement said that “respect for the democratic process” is the only viable path forward for Afghanistan, the next Afghan government to many has the appearance of a product of more of negotiations than vote tallies.

A power-sharing deal was almost sealed about a week ago, but Abdullah then demanded that no vote totals from the runoff be released.

The U.S. official said the United States government believes the new president was declared as the result of quantitative electoral results from many millions of legitimate votes and that though a political agreement was made to form a unity government the government is headed by a president decided upon by an electoral process.

U.N. and Afghan election officials spent weeks auditing the runoff results after allegations of fraud, a common occurrence over Afghanistan’s last two presidential elections. Abdullah’s side maintained the fraud was so sophisticated it was undetectable.

The U.S. has been pushing for a resolution so the next president can sign a security agreement that would allow about 10,000 U.S. forces to remain in the country after combat operations wrap up at the end of the year. Karzai refused to sign it; Ghani Ahmadzai has said he will.

The 13-year war against the Taliban has largely been turned over to Afghan security forces, a development that has seen casualties among Afghan soldiers rise significantly this year.

The U.S. and international community will continue to fund the Afghan army in the coming years but the Afghans themselves will have to fend off Taliban attempts to again take over wide areas of the country.

TIME Scotland

Russia Says Scottish Referendum Could Have Been Rigged

Scottish Independence Referendum 2014
Robert Perry—EPA Dejected Yes supporters in Glasgow, Scotland, on Sept. 19, 2014.

They should know

Scotland’s historic election on independence did not meet international standards for constitutional referendums, the head of a Russian voting rights organization has said, with procedures that left the result subject to rigging and vote-tampering.

Igor Borisov, chairman of the Public Institute of Suffrage in Moscow (also translated as the Russian Public Institute of Electoral Law), said the voting took place according to United Kingdom voting rules, which differ from the international community’s accepted procedures for such votes, Russian news agency Ria Novosti reports.

The unusual criticism comes just months after the international community rejected the results of a referendum in Crimea. The White House said the March ballot had been “administered under threats of violence and intimidation from a Russian military intervention that violates international law.”

Borisov said the chief concern in Scotland was the counting of the votes, which he alleges was not secure and was open to potential voter fraud and rigging. Borisov noted that the vote-counting room was the size of an “aircraft hangar,” which opened up the democratic process to tampering.

“Even if you want to, it’s impossible to tell what’s happening,” he said. “It’s also unclear where the boxes with ballot papers come from.”

[Ria Novosti]

TIME Syria

Wife of British Hostage Pleads ISIS for Release

An undated family handout photo of British aid worker Alan Henning taken at a refugee camp on the Turkish-Syria border
Reuters An undated family handout photo of British aid worker Alan Henning taken at a refugee camp on the Turkish-Syria border.

Alan Henning's wife implored militants to release her husband from captivity

LONDON — The wife of a British aid worker held hostage by the Islamic State group has issued a statement pleading for the militants to release him and respond to her messages “before it is too late.”

The Islamic State group, which has released online videos showing the beheading of two American journalists and another British aid worker, has threatened to kill former taxi driver Alan Henning next.

Henning, 47, was kidnapped in December in Syria, shortly after crossing into the country from Turkey in an aid convoy.

His wife, Barbara, implored the militants to “see it in their hearts” to release him in a statement released by Britain’s Foreign Office late Saturday.

“Alan is a peaceful, selfless man who left his family and his job as a taxi driver in the U.K. to drive in a convoy all the way to Syria with his Muslim colleagues and friends to help those most in need,” she wrote.

“His purpose for being there was no more and no less. This was an act of sheer compassion,” she said.

The aid worker was driving an ambulance loaded with food and water at the time of the kidnapping, Barbara Henning said. She added that the militants have not responded to her repeated attempts to make contact.

Her appeal came after dozens of Muslim leaders in Britain urged the Islamic State group to release Henning.

More than 100 imams and Muslim organizations signed a statement expressing their “horror and revulsion” at the murder of three other hostages, including Briton David Haines.

They said the extremists were “not acting as Muslims” but as “monsters.”

TIME Military

U.S. Jets Intercept Russian Aircraft Near Alaska

F-22 Raptor Dedication Pass
Keith Draycott—FlickrVision Lockheed Martin F-22A Raptor carries out a 'Dedication Pass' as part of it's display at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Anchorage, Alaska.

The Russian planes, which included two bombers and two fighter jets, were nearing the Alaska coast

Two American F-22 fighter jets intercepted six Russian military airplanes that neared the cost of Alaska, military officials said Friday.

The U.S. jets intercepted the Russian planes 55 nautical miles from the Alaskan coast, Lt. Col. Michael Jazdyk, a spokesman for the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, told the Associated Press.

The Russian planes—which included two long-range bombers and two fighter jets—looped south and returned to Russia after the U.S. jets scrambled to meet them. The Russian jets did not enter sovereign airspace of the United States, but rather entered an area that extends 200 miles out from the coastline known as the Air Defense Identification Zone.

The U.S. fighter jets were scrambled “basically to let those aircraft know that we see them, and in case of a threat, to let them know we are there to protect our sovereign airspace,” said Jazdyk.

[AP]

TIME Iraq

Dozens of Turkish ISIS Hostages Freed in ‘Rescue Effort’

A late-night operation brought 46 Turkish citizens home

Dozens of Turkish hostages who had been held by Islamist militants for three months were freed Saturday in northern Iraq.

Forty-nine people were seized in June when the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS) raided the Turkish consulate in Mosul, abducting Consul General Ozturk Yilmaz, his family members and other citizens. All 49 have now been freed and returned to their home country, CNN reports. Forty-six of the captives were Turkish citizens.

Exactly how the hostages were returned to Turkey is unclear, but Turkish authorities described their release as the result of a late-night rescue operation. “At around 11:30 at night, this rescue effort reached its final stage,” Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu told a crowd in Ankara.

“I thank … every single member of the national intelligence agency from the director to the field operatives,” said Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. “I congratulate them for their big success from the bottom of my heart.”

Mosul quickly capitulated when ISIS attacked the city on June 10.

[CNN]

TIME Scotland

Donald Trump: Wind Energy Support Hurt Scottish Independence Movement

The billionaire thinks Alex Salmond’s support of wind energy may have hurt his referendum efforts

fortunelogo-blue
This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

By Ben Geier

There’s been a lot of talk today about why exactly the people of Scotland voted to stay in the United Kingdom instead of becoming an independent country: Was it patriotism? Concerns about national security? Or an unclear vision for the future monetary policy of an independent Scotland?

Donald Trump thinks he knows the real reason: wind turbines.

Trump told Fortune that recently resigned Scottish First Minister and leader of the independence campaign Alex Salmond is a huge supporter of wind energy, something Trump says contributed to the deterioration of his relationship with the politician, whom he said he knows “very well.”

“Had he not littered Scotland with these horrible wind turbines, which have raised everybody’s taxes … I think he would have done much better,” Trump told Fortune. “There’s tremendous anger [in Scotland] over this subject.”

Trump, of course, has been fighting wind farms in Scotland for years. Earlier this year he decided not to build a second golf course in the country after he lost a legal challenge to block the building of new turbines (he decided to build a course in Ireland instead.)

There has been some talk in recent days that, had the independence campaign been successful, Salmond and the Scottish National Party would have had to put their ambitious wind energy plans on hold.

For the rest of the story, please go to Fortune.com.

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