TIME Ferguson

Ferguson Mayor: No Severance Package for Darren Wilson

The police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown had been on administrative leave since the shooting

The police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown did not receive a severance package for resigning, the mayor of Ferguson, Mo., announced Sunday.

According to Mayor James Knowles, 28-year-old Darren Wilson will not receive benefits or further pay following his Saturday resignation, the Associated Press reports.

Wilson’s lawyer, Neil Bruntrager, said Wilson resigned following threats against the police department of the St. Louis suburb.

Last Monday, a grand jury announced its decision to not indict Wilson for killing unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown during an Aug. 9 incident that sparked days of protests across the U.S. Wilson had been on administrative leave since then.

Brown’s family said Wilson’s resignation was not surprising.

“It was always believed that the police officer would do what was in his best interest, both personally and professionally,” said Benjamin Crump, an attorney speaking for Brown’s family. “We didn’t believe that he would be able to be effective for the Ferguson community nor the Ferguson Police Department because of the tragic circumstances that claimed the life of Michael Brown Jr.”

[Huffington Post]

TIME New York

Couple Says ‘I Do’ on New York Subway Car

nyc subway
Sami Suni—Getty Images

"A lot of the good times have taken place on the train"

Subways riders in New York City are used to being interrupted with announcements, but they’re rarely as romantic as what happened on the N train Friday.

Tatyana Sandler, 25, and Hector Irakliotis, 26, tied the knot as the N train crossed the Manhattan Bridge, the New York Daily News reports.

Irakliotis boarded the train first with his groomsmen, inviting other passengers to stay but to please move to the other side of the car. His groomsmen decorated the seats and poles with ribbons before Sandler, in a white wedding dress, boarded the train with her maid of honor.

While the best man played John Mayer’s “City Love” from an iPhone, Sandler walked down “the aisle.” The couple chose the unconventional location because, like many New York residents, they spent so much time traveling on it during their relationship.

“We’ve been through a lot. Good times, bad times, and a lot of the good times have taken place on the train,” Irakliotis said. “Confessions of love, reconciliations, goofy, ridiculous conversations — the whole spectrum. In New York, you spend so much time on the train, we thought why not?”

[NY Daily News]

TIME Crime

Boy Discovered Behind Fake Wall 4 Years After Reported Missing

The 13-year-old used text messages to contact his mom

A 13-year-old Georgia boy reported missing four years ago was reunited with his mother after police found him in a hidden garage compartment in his father’s home, police said.

The boy used a secret smartphone app to contact his mother via text, ABC News reports. Police visited the home and interviewed its occupants but left empty-handed until the boy sent a second message describing his exact location. He was discovered in an insulation area above the garage, behind a fake wall concealed by a linen closet.

“We opened the compartment where he was,” Clayton County Police Sgt. Joanna Southerland said. “I saw him and asked him to come forward, and he was horrified. He was frozen with fear.”

The boy was reported missing four years ago after visiting with his father, Gregory Jean. Jean and his girlfriend, Samantha Davis, and three other juveniles were arrested after police found the boy on Saturday.

[ABC]

TIME Education

Colleges Continue to Put Burden of Price Hikes on Poorest

Student College University
Getty Images

Even colleges that signed a White House pledge to help low-income students are making it more expensive

Decked out in black tie and formal dresses, guests at Mr. Jefferson’s Capital Ball finished their salmon with horseradish sauce just in time to dance to classics like “Shout” and “My Girl” in the Grand Ballroom of Washington, D.C.’s historic Mayflower Hotel. Some of the people who paid up to $400 a couple to attend the event even joined in the Electric Slide.

The mood was understandably festive: The gala had the commendable purpose of raising money for scholarships to the University of Virginia.

But not the kind of scholarships that go to low-income students based solely on their financial need. The proceeds from Mr. Jefferson’s Capital Ball were for merit aid for applicants who have the high grade-point averages and top scores on entrance tests that help institutions do well on college rankings. Merit aid can also attract middle- and upper-income students whose families can afford to pay the rest of the tuition bill — an attractive proposition for schools that are increasingly reliant on revenue from students.

As institutions compete to lure top-performing applicants in this way, regardless of their need, they’re raising their net prices much faster for the lowest-income students than for higher-income ones, according to an analysis of newly released data the universities and colleges are required to report to the U.S. Department of Education.

This trend includes the 100 higher-education institutions whose leaders attended a widely publicized White House summit in January and signed a pledge to expand the opportunities for low-income students to go to college. In fact, the private universities in that group collectively raised what the poorest families pay by 10%, compared to 5% for wealthier students, according to the analysis by The Dallas Morning News and The Hechinger Report based on information the U.S. Department of Education released this month covering 2008-09 to 2012-13, the most recent period available.

Not only did the schools at the White House summit raise their net prices faster for the poorest families on a percentage basis, the new figures show; nearly a third increased the actual dollar amount more quickly for their lowest-income students.

The effect, critics say, is that college is becoming less accessible to lower-income students.

“All too many elite, extremely wealthy colleges and universities that should be operating as engines of socioeconomic mobility are instead calcifying inequality,” says Michael Dannenberg, director of higher education at the nonpartisan think tank The Education Trust.

Some colleges that have raised their net prices dispute the federal data, and note that even families in what appear to be higher-income brackets need help paying for college.

The White House has scheduled a follow-up summit for Thursday on the issue of keeping college affordable for the lowest-income students. “Institutions need to remain vigilant in making sure that the students with the highest need have the highest access to aid,” saysTed Mitchell, U.S. Under Secretary of Education.

Understanding Net Price

Colleges are required to annually report their average net prices—the total cost of tuition, fees, room, board, books, and other expenses, minus federal, state, and institutional scholarships and grants—to the Education Department. They must also break down those prices based on students’ family income, from the lowest—$30,000 or less—to the highest—$110,000 or more.

There are limitations to the data. They include only full-time freshmen who get federal grants, loans, or work-study jobs. The most recent figures cover the period ending more than a year before that initial January White House summit. And some schools dispute how net price should be determined and use their own calculations that are different from the federal formula.

But the federal figures give the only standardized picture of what students from different income brackets pay to study at the same university or college. The data also make clear that, while lower-income students at many of the institutions that signed on to the White House pledge still pay less than higher-income ones, their net prices are rising faster on an inflation-adjusted percentage basis than the net prices charged to students more able to pay. In some cases, costs for the wealthier families are actually falling.

Even at the 36 taxpayer-supported public universities that signed the promise to help low-income families, the average net price for poor students rose 25% in the last four years, from about $8,000 in 2008-09 to almost $10,000 in 2012-13. During the same period, wealthier students at those schools saw their average net price go from about $18,000 to $21,000, a 16% increase. The figures have been adjusted for inflation.

At the University of Virginia, for instance, the poorest students saw their net price climb $4,313 over that period, compared to $2,687 for students in the top earning bracket. Despite UVA President Teresa Sullivan’s White House pledge to help poor families afford the price of college, from the start of the economic downturn through last year, the university raised the net price for its very poorest students by 69%, more than three times faster than for wealthier students, the federal figures show. Even after the January summit, beginning with the class that entered this fall, the public university dropped a policy of meeting full need for the lowest-income students without requiring them to take out loans, and now asks in-state families to borrow up to $14,000 over four years and out-of-state families up to $28,000.

Cuts in state allocations for higher education have also reduced the money available for financial aid for low-income students. G. David Gearhart, chancellor of the University of Arkansas, said at the White House summit that providing educational opportunities to disadvantaged students “is part of our heritage.” Yet the public university raised its net price for the poorest families by 9% while lowering it 6% for wealthier ones between 2008-09 and 2012-13. The lopsided changes in cost there came even before the Arkansas State Lottery Scholarship was cut last year by more than 50%, says university spokeswoman Laura Jacobs, threatening to reduce even more funding for low-income students.

Universities “are giving lots of merit aid to kids who don’t need it,” and less financial aid to those who do, says Richard Kahlenberg, a senior fellow at the nonpartisan think tank The Century Foundation. “There are powerful incentives for universities to avoid admitting and enrolling low-income students. The way that universities compete is on prestige and on the U.S.News & World Report rankings, and you get no credit for having a generous financial aid program that brings in more low-income students.”

No Magic Number

A UVA spokesman says Mr. Jefferson’s Capital Ball is run by an independent foundation of alumni and other supporters, not by the university itself. He also says the elimination of the no-loan policy for low-income students was unavoidable because the cost of assisting them exclusively with grants had nearly doubled since 2008. “UVA has committed to providing the necessary need but also needs to ensure that the program is sustainable,” the spokesman, McGregor McCance, says. Requiring all students to borrow is projected to save the university more than $10 million through 2018.

Heated protests over the changes, however, brought attention to the fact that, even as it was cutting the cost of providing financial aid to its poorest students, UVA was spending $12 million on a new squash facility and increasing its marketing budget by $18 million annually. Since then, a member of the Board of Visitors, Blue Ridge Capital president John Griffin, has pledged $4 million for scholarships for high-achieving low-income students and to seed an endowment to provide financial aid for top low-income undergraduates.

Other universities and colleges that were represented at the White House summit say their net prices for low-income students appeared to be increasing more quickly than they really have because they use different formulas than the federal government does to calculate whether or not a student has financial need. For example, while the government takes into account only the income of the custodial parent in the case of a divorce, these colleges also factor in the income of the parent who does not live at home, and often the value of real estate and other holdings. This means they do not necessarily regard as low income the same students the federal government does, and may not provide them with much financial aid.

That’s one reason Claremont McKenna College says it appears to have more than doubled its net price for its poorest students—10 times as fast as for their richer classmates—in spite of also signing the White House pledge, spokesman Max Benavidez says. “Moving from one formula in reporting aid to another completely different methodological formula may account for the misimpression of a large increase,” Benavidez says, though he would not provide the formula the college uses.

Oberlin, another White House-pledge college that uses its own formula to calculate need, did provide specifics. While federal figures show it doubled the net price for its poorest students at a rate 10 times as fast as for the highest group, Oberlin’s own calculations—which include the earnings of both parents in cases of divorce, making fewer students qualify as low income than the federal method—show that the net price for the poorest students hardly budged in the last three years and fell in 2012-13, says Debra Chermonte, dean of admissions and financial aid.

Nor are seemingly wealthier families always necessarily able to afford tuition without help. Some may live in places with high costs of living, leaving them with less disposable income, or have children close in age who go to college at the same time.“You might be making $200,000 a year, but you just got divorced and that’s a factor and this is a factor and there are other factors,” says Michael Crow, president of Arizona State University.Families that are not low-income but still need help paying for the growing cost of college can get forgotten in the discussion, says Patrick Leahy, president of Wilkes University. “There’s plenty of aid going to the $80,000 [earners] and below, but once you get to $80,000 it’s not like it’s some magic number and you can suddenly afford tuition,” he says.

Yet other universities and colleges at which the net price for low-income students has shot up faster than for higher-income ones conceded that financial aid based on merit, as opposed to need, is increasingly important to their bottom lines. “Tuition-driven schools like UVM must think holistically about the entire undergraduate population and use more merit aid than in the past,” says Enrique Corredera, spokesman for the public University of Vermont, another school that signed the White House pledge but has more than doubled the annual net price for its poorest students, from $4,500 in 2008-09 to $11,000 in 2012-13. Meanwhile, the net price for students in top income group stayed flat at $21,000 a year. “We do this to attract academically talented students, who play a significant role in determining our ability to attract other students.”

Corredera says wealthier students, whose families can afford to pay at least some of the tuition, also subsidize financial aid for their poorer classmates. That subsidy is under attack in some states. The board of governors of North Carolina’s public universities, for example, is considering capping the proportion of tuition revenue that could be applied toward financial aid for low-income students, arguing that more affluent students shouldn’t be forced to cover the costs of their less affluent classmates. Iowa has already stopped its universities from using any of their in-state residents’ tuition toward financial aid.

“It’s politically popular to invest a lot of state money in merit-based aid. It’s very appealing to the middle class,” says Michael McLendon, a professor of higher-education policy at Southern Methodist University. “It’s not helpful for boosting higher-education access or completion for the poorest kids.”

There’s at least one glimmer of promise for critics of current aid practices. As the heat on this matter is being turned up, states, on average, slightly increased the share of financial aid they allocated for low-income students, as opposed to other students, in 2012-13, the latest year for which that figure is available, according to the National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs. On the other hand, the inflation-adjusted amount of total aid actually declined.

This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, nonpartisan education-news outlet affiliated with Teachers College, Columbia University, in collaboration with the Dallas Morning News and the Education Writers Association.

 Chart College Tuition

 

Read next: The Best and Worst Places to Live for a Low-Cost College Education

TIME Crime

Missouri Governor Seeks Funding to Pay Police in Ferguson

Missouri National Guardsmen stand guard at the Ferguson Police Station in Ferguson Missouri
Jim Young—Reuters Missouri National Guardsmen stand guard at the Ferguson Police Station in Ferguson, Missouri, Nov. 26, 2014.

It was unclear how much more money is needed

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon called a late-night state legislative session to discuss “critical funding” needs for the National Guard and state police after violent protests in Ferguson this week.

Nixon called upon the legislature to ensure that Guard members are paid on Dec. 15, the governor’s office said in a statement. The budget allots $4 million for the state’s National Guard emergency funding and $3.4 million for Missouri state agencies emergency response, but it was unclear how much more money is needed.

“Time is of the essence,” said Nixon. “It is vital that we act quickly so that we can fulfill our obligation to the men and women who are so bravely and capably serving their fellow citizens.”

Protests have led to clashes between protesters, police and the National Guard this week. Police arrested at least 16 people on Friday as the unrest bubbled over into the weekend, CNN reports.

TIME justice

A Cop Hugs a Tearful Boy in This Powerful Ferguson Protest Photo

Devonte Hart Ferguson
Johnny H. Nguyen Police Sgt. Bret Barnum hugs 12-year-old Devonte Hart during a demonstration in Portland, Ore., Nov. 25, 2014.

Meet the photographer who captured a rare moment of empathy in the Ferguson protests

A demonstration in Portland, Oregon was the scene of an unusual embrace last week.

The November 25 protest was held, along with many across the United States, in solidarity with the family of Michael Brown, the unarmed black teenager shot and killed by a white policeman in August, following a grand jury’s decision not to indict the officer.

Photographer Johnny Nguyen brought his camera to the protest and met a 12-year-old black boy named Devonte Hart, who was overcome with emotion.

“I saw tears running down Devonte’s face and a sign that said free hugs around his neck,” Nguyen, 20, recalls. “There was a lot going on, but my gut told right then and there to stay with this kid.”

Nguyen followed Devonte through the crowd and watched as a white Portland police officer named Bret Barnum looked at Devonte’s sign and asked, “Do I get one of those?” The pair hugged.

“It has spread the message of coming together despite our differences,” says Nguyen of the photo, which he put on Instagram. “The message is about love and compassion and finding a common ground.”

After the hug, the two went their separate ways: the 12-year-old Hart to go protest, and Barnum to do police work.

Nguyen says that Americans have been waiting for a sign of togetherness after the vitriol and anger of the past week. “I think people deep down have been clambering for a glimmer of hope amidst all the negativity going on,” Nguyen said. “I’m just glad I was there, in the right place and the right time.”

TIME Teenagers

‘The Luckiest Generation': LIFE With Teenagers in 1950s America

From LIFE in 1954, a snapshot of a specific segment of American society at a singular moment in the nation's history

If there’s one thing we humans like to do, it’s label ourselves and one another. Sometimes those labels, applied to vast numbers of people, are obviously laudatory (The Greatest Generation). Sometimes they’re pitying (The Lost Generation). Sometimes they’re duly withering (The Me Generation). And sometimes, at least in the moment, they’re just plain accurate.

In June 1954, LIFE magazine published an article titled “The Luckiest Generation” that, revisited 60 years later, feels like an almost perfect snapshot of a certain segment of American society at a particular moment in the nation’s history. We’ll let LIFE set the scene:

The morning traffic and parking problems [LIFE wrote] became so critical at the Carlsbad, N.M., high school that school authorities in 1953 were finally forced to a solution: they set aside a special parking area for students only. In Carlsbad, as everywhere else, teenagers are not only driving new cars to school but in many cases are buying them out of their own earnings. These are the children who at birth were called “Depression babies.” They have grown up to become, materially at least, America’s luckiest generation.

Young people 16 to 20 are the beneficiaries of the very economic collapse that brought chaos almost a generation ago. The Depression tumbled the nation’s birth rate to an all-time low in 1933, and today’s teenage group is proportionately a smaller part of the total population than in more than 70 years. Since there are fewer of them, each — in the most prosperous time in U.S. history — gets a bigger piece of the nation’s economic pie than any previous generation ever got. This means they can almost have their pick of the jobs that are around. . . . To them working has a double attraction: the pay is good and, since their parents are earning more too, they are often able to keep the money for themselves.

A few things to point out here. First, and probably most obvious, is the racial makeup of the “teenage group” that LIFE focused on, at least pictorially, in that 1954 article: there might be a few people of color in one or two of the photographs in this gallery, but we certainly have not been able to find them.

Second, the nature of the boon — of the improbable and unprecedented good fortune — that befell these kids is not that they’re spoiled rotten, or that every possible creature comfort has been handed to them. Instead, it’s that they have the opportunity to work at virtually any job they choose. “They are often able to keep the money” that they earn.

So, yes, they were lucky — and compared to countless generations of youth who came before, all over the world, white working- and middle-class teens in 1950s America were, for the most part, incredibly lucky. But unlike the entitled creatures that most of us would count as the “luckiest” (and the most obnoxious) among us these days, the teens profiled in LIFE in 1954 don’t look or feel especially coddled.

They look secure. They look confident. They look, in some elemental way, independent. They’re learning, day by day, what it means to make one’s way in the world.

In that sense, maybe they were the luckiest generation, after all.

Liz Ronk, the Photo Editor for LIFE.com, edited this gallery. Follow her on Twitter at @LizabethRonk.

TIME Ferguson

Ferguson Protesters Take Lead in TIME’s Person of the Year Poll

The protests over the grand jury decision this week have captivated international attention

Ferguson protestors have gained the lead in TIME’s Person of the Year poll, with seven days to go in the voting.

Unrest in Ferguson and around the country focused attention on race and policing, helping to lift Ferguson protestors into first place in the TIME reader poll with 10.7% of the vote. Thousands of demonstrators marched in solidarity with the family of Michael Brown, an unarmed black man who was shot by the police, disrupting Black Friday shopping in San Francisco, Chicago, New York, Seattle and other cities.

Protests cropped up all across the United States in the wake of a grand jury’s decision in Ferguson Monday not to indict the white police officer who fatally shot Brown.

Narendra Modi, the newly elected Indian prime minister, stands at 10% in the polls. As the leader of the largest democracy in the world, Modi has raised high hopes among Indians that he can invigorate the country’s economy and cut bureaucratic red tape that has slowed development in India.

Should the Ferguson Protestors Be TIME’s Person of the Year? Vote Below for #TIMEPOY

Since 1927, TIME has named a person who for better or worse has most influenced the news and our lives in the past year.

The Person of the Year is selected by TIME’s editors, but readers are asked to weigh in by commenting on any TIME Facebook post that includes #TIMEPOY, tweeting your vote using #TIMEPOY, or by heading over to TIME.com’s Person of the Year voting hub, where Pinnion’s technology is recording, visualizing and analyzing results as they are received. Votes from Twitter, Facebook and TIME.com’s voting hub are pooled together to create the totals displayed on the site. You can see the results of the poll and vote on your choice for person of the year here.

TIME politics

Robert F. Kennedy: Rare and Classic Photos of an Undaunted Man

Of the three Kennedy brothers -- John, Robert and Edward -- Bobby best embodied the contradictions at play within that famed family

Of the three Kennedy brothers — John, Robert and Edward — who ascended to the national political stage in the 1950s and ’60s, it was arguably the middle brother, Bobby, who best embodied the enormous contradictions at play within that famed (and, it sometimes seems, cursed) American family.

There was, for example, RFK’s fraught relationship with liberals — and with American liberalism in general. As the author and historian Sean Wilentz once wrote while reviewing a largely unflattering biography of Kennedy in the New York Times:

Robert F. Kennedy always irked liberals; and they always irked him. . . . Kennedy’s association with the reckless Sen. Joseph McCarthy in the 1950s forever tainted his reputation in some reform circles. As his brother’s presidential campaign manager in 1960, and thereafter as attorney general, he struck many liberals as ruthless in the pursuit of power and reluctant in the pursuit of principle, especially regarding civil rights. Kennedy, for his part, regarded his liberal critics as hopeless, sanctimonious losers who put purity above political realism, and who seemed to think that sure-fire defeat was inherently noble.

That Bobby Kennedy was, like his brothers and many of his other relatives, past and present, a titanically driven individual is hardly news. There’s a reason, after all, that he’s still despised today, five decades after his death, by some liberals and most conservatives: he did not fit into a neat, ideological box and — then as now — neither side knew what to do with a man who refused to act and speak according to their expectations and their rules.

Then there was his relationship with Lyndon Johnson — a man who, according to virtually everyone who knew both men, hated Bobby Kennedy with an intensity matched only by RFK’s loathing for his brother’s successor as president.

But Kennedy also had an intellectual and — in public, at least — an emotional poise that makes most present-day American politicians seem glib and trifling by comparison. (Is there a sitting U.S. senator or representative whom one can picture quoting Herodotus or Sophocles, from memory, as Kennedy so often did?)

Of course, like his brothers — especially John — Robert Kennedy was also able to immediately and powerfully connect with crowds in a way that most politicians can only envy, and there were certainly people who saw greatness in him and in his future.

“He is one of the half-dozen men in the country today qualified for top political leadership,” one of Lyndon Johnson’s advisers told LIFE writer Robert Ajemian. “He really cares about right and wrong. He cares about people.”

Here, LIFE.com shares photos — most of which never ran in LIFE magazine — of Kennedy and his extended and immediate family in 1964. The pictures, by LIFE’s George Silk, capture a man who, as Robert Ajemian wrote in the magazine’s July 3, 1964, issue, “had shouldered massive burdens” in the six months since his brother John was gunned down in Dallas the previous November.

A major preoccupation of Bob Kennedy’s in the past six months [Ajemian wrote] has been his family — and now it includes his brother’s children, Caroline, who is 6, and John, who is 3. Jackie Kennedy brings them out almost every day to their uncle’s home, Hickory Hill, five miles outside Washington. Bob and [his wife] Ethel spend as much time with them as with their own brood of eight. “They think of it as their own home,” says Jackie Kennedy. “Anything that comes up involving a father, like father’s day at school, I always mention Bobby’s name. Caroline shows him her report cards.”

But even surrounded by so many loved ones, and so busy with speeches and appearances around the country, the rawness of the loss of his older brother was, it seems, never far away. After a speech in Pittsburgh, a reporter asked Kennedy, “What do you miss most about your brother?”

“Kennedy looked startled,” Ajemian reported, “and stared at the reporter as he sought the exact answer. His face softened and he said, ‘Just that he’s not here.'”

Four months after the LIFE cover story, Robert F. Kennedy was elected as the Democratic U.S. Senator from New York. He served until June 6, 1968, when he was assassinated by a gunman named Sirhan Sirhan, while campaigning in Los Angeles for his party’s presidential nomination. Robert Kennedy was 42 — four years younger than John Kennedy was when he was killed.

Liz Ronk, who edited this gallery, is the Photo Editor for LIFE.com. Follow her on Twitter at @LizabethRonk.

TIME United Nations

U.N. Panel Sharply Criticizes Police Brutality in U.S.

Ferguson
John Amis—AP Atlanta Police in riot gear form a line on Williams Streets as protesters make their way down it in Atlanta, Ga. on Nov. 25, 2014,

Michael Brown's parents testified before the committee

A United Nations panel criticized the United States for police brutality, military interrogations and excessive use of force by law enforcement in a report released Friday.

“There are numerous areas in which certain things should be changed for the United States to comply fully with the convention,” said Alessio Bruni, a member of the United Nations Committee Against Torture, referring to U.N. agreements on torture.

The panel released their report just days after violence erupted in Ferguson, Mo., following the announcement of a grand jury’s decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for shooting and killing unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

While the latest U.N. report did not mention Ferguson explicitly, Brown’s parents testified before the committee in Geneva earlier this month. And the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights who oversees the committee on torture, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, raised concerns over “institutionalized discrimination in the U.S.” and added that he was unsure about whether the Ferguson grand jury’s decision complies with international human rights law.

“It is clear that, at least among some sectors of the population, there is a deep and festering lack of confidence in the fairness of the justice and law enforcement systems,” the commissioner said in a statement.

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