TIME Travel

See Images of Airplanes at Night Like You’ve Never Seen Them Before

Holiday travel is never easy, but these long exposures are beautiful

This summer, photographer Kevin Kunstadt began making long exposures of airplanes as they flew over the New York City area at night, creating these surreal and eerily beautiful images that chart the flight paths travelers will take this weekend. “A bit of guesswork and luck was involved due to the variability of the flight paths and the time it takes to set up each shot — you can only kind of estimate where the planes might go based on prior flight paths that you might see while framing the shot, ” Kunstadt told TIME. “The website Flightaware.com was tremendously helpful as far as gauging the timing of potential planes, and figuring out when to start an exposure. The exposures themselves were between 3 and 30 minutes.” His images capture light trails usually invisible to the human eye, and a view you are unlikely to see during this weekend’s travel.

TIME States

Woman Dies at Burning Man After Being Hit by Bus

This is a DigitalGlobe satellite image "overview" of the Burning Man Festival in Black Rock City Nevada.
DigitalGlobe/ScapeWare3d—DigitalGlobe/Getty Images This is a DigitalGlobe satellite image "overview" of the Burning Man Festival in Black Rock City Nevada.

Some 60,000 people are in the Nevada desert for the festival.

A woman died at Nevada’s Burning Man Festival after she was run over by a bus early Thursday, event organizers said.

According to a statement posted to a website affiliated with the festival, local officials say the woman is believed to have died after falling under a bus carrying festival participants. The woman has not been identified, and the Pershing County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the incident.

“This is a terrible accident,” Burning Man co-founder Marian Goodell said in a statement. “Our thoughts and prayers are with her family, friends and campmates. Black Rock Rangers and Emergency Services Department staff are providing support to those affected.”

Some 60,000 people are converging on the Nevada desert this week for the annual arts and culture festival.

TIME Crime

Feds Investigating Cyberattack on JPMorgan Chase and Other Banks

U.S. Banks Post Near-Record Profits In Second Quarter Of 2014
Andrew Burton—Getty Images A man walks past JP Morgan Chase's corporate headquarters on August 12, 2014 in New York City.

The motivation is still unclear

Federal authorities are helping to investigate reported cyberattacks against JPMorgan Chase and other banks, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said.

FBI Supervisory Special Agent Joshua Campbell told the Washington Post in a statement late Wednesday that the agency was working with the Secret Service “to determine the scope of recently reported cyber attacks against several American financial institutions.”

Multiple news outlets, including Bloomberg News and The New York Times, are reporting that the banks were infiltrated by hackers who stole gigabytes of data, including information that would enable them to siphon money from accounts. Both organizations cite unnamed sources.

The motivation behind the attacks and the identity of the attackers is still unclear, though Bloomberg, which first reported the intrusions, reports that at least one of the banks was linked to Russian hackers.

Earlier this month, a U.S. cybersecurity firm said that a Russian crime ring was suspected of obtaining access to a record 1.2 billion username and password combinations.

[Washington Post]

TIME The Answers Issue

In The Latest Issue

The Answer Issue Time Magazine International-Asia Cover

The Answers Issue
For the rest of the Answers Issue, visit time.com/answers.

The Second Age of Reason
Information overload will improve our lives

The Real Ice Bucket Challenge
What’s harder than dumping freezing water on your head? Repeating this kind of success

Detroit: America’s Emerging Market
How the city can teach us to reinvest the rest of the U.S. economy

A Battle of Two Veterans
In an edgy political year, a former Marine tests a longtime Democratic pol for a seat near Boston

Obama Goes to War (With Congress)
The President began bombing ISIS on his own, but only Congress can start a war

Scotland’s Disunited Kingdom
Voters face a referendum on independence from Britain

Apps Charging for Free Services Get Savvy—and Sleazy
Booking a reservation or finding a parking spot just got a whole lot easier and more expensive

Ferguson’s Next Chapter
Can a town turn a tragic moment into a lasting movement?

Tablets for Tots
Meet the uber-tablet made specially for kids and families

Stand Up for Your Health
All-day sitting hurts the body. Here’s a novel way to undo the damage

Patton Oswalt: Why I Quit Twitter—And Will Again
Maybe the next fashionable rebellion is to become “unlinked”—only reachable face-to-face

Wall Street Goes Green
Why is solar booming? Finance

Banker Who Predicted 2008 Meltdown Is Worried Again
Raghuram Rajan is seeing troubling sings

Spinning Classes: Coming Soon to a Living Room Near You
How Peloton makes it easy—and fun—to cycle at home

Jessica Chastain’s Triple Play
One of the year’s buzzier films is being released in three different versions

In Transparent, a Breasted Development
Jeffrey Tambor explores a radical new phase of life— and the series itself breaks away from TV tradition

XKCD: When Physics Is Funny
The man behind the web’s smartest comics takes his science project where it’s never been before: paper

The Kids are Alright in This Is Our Youth
Michael Cera isn’t the only stage rookie in the new Broadway play

Henri Matisse Cuts Loose
In old age, French master made some of his most vibrant work, the cut-paper collages coming to Manhattan

Maroon 5 Falls Off the Bandwagon
The group hasn’t been a rock outfit for many years—and that’s just fine with Adam Levine

Life Lessons From One of the World’s Oldest Men
Charlie White, who died at 109, was able to separate the things he could control from the things that he could not

Quake Alert
In California, a brief heads-up

Milestones

Richard Attenborough
Actor and director

Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol
American Ebola patients

All’s Fair in Love and …

World

Briefing

TIME nation

Detroit: America’s Emerging Market

How the city can teach us to reinvest the rest of the U.S. economy

In August, a year after I wrote a TIME cover story on Detroit’s bankruptcy, I visited Motown again. This time I found myself reporting on a remarkable economic resurgence that could become a model for other beleaguered American communities. Even as Detroit continues to struggle with blight and decline–more than 70,500 properties were foreclosed on in the past four years, and basic public services like streetlights and running water are still spotty in some areas–its downtown is booming, full of bustling restaurants, luxury lofts, edgy boutiques and newly renovated office buildings.

The city struck me as a template for much of the postcrisis U.S. economy–thriftier, more entrepreneurial and nimble. Many emerging-market cities, from Istanbul to Lagos to Mumbai, share similar characteristics, good and bad. The water might be off on Detroit’s perimeter, but migrants are flooding into its center, drawn by lower-cost housing and a creative-hive effect that’s spawned a host of new businesses.

Much of the resurgence has been led by Quicken Loans founder Dan Gilbert, who a few years back decided to relocate his company’s headquarters downtown, moving from the suburbs to take advantage of the city’s postcrisis “skyscraper sales,” as well as the growing desire of young workers to live in urban hubs. “If I wanted to attract kids from Harvard or Georgetown, there was no way it was going to happen in a suburb of Detroit, where you’re going to walk on asphalt 200 yards to your car in the middle of February and have no interaction with anyone in the world except who’s in your building,” says Gilbert, 52.

Since 2010, Gilbert has created 6,500 new jobs downtown, bought up tens of thousands of square feet of cheap real estate and brought in 100 new business and retail tenants, including hot firms like Twitter, as well as a bevy of professional-services firms. Lowe Campbell Ewald, one of General Motors’ advertising agencies, recently moved back downtown after years in the suburbs, citing better client-recruitment possibilities there. Companies of all types are catering to a growing number of young entrepreneurs who are making the most of cheap real estate (Quicken subsidizes rents and mortgages) and local talent (southern Michigan still has one of the nation’s highest concentrations of industrial-product designers) to create new businesses. For instance, there’s Chalkfly, a dotcom that sells office and school supplies online, and Shinola, the cult-hit watch company that advertises $600 timepieces as “made in Detroit.” Their success is already raising rents–per-square-foot rates have doubled in the past four years–and bringing in tony retail brands like Whole Foods.

The question now is how to spread the prosperity. The answer starts with better public transportation. Motown has always been a disaster in this respect. It used to be that nobody wanted to go downtown; now nobody wants to leave. The M-1 Rail, a new public-private streetcar due to be completed in 2016, aims to link neighborhoods. GM, Penske, Quicken and other firms are contributing the majority of its $140 million cost, and the rail will be donated back to the city within a few years. Studies show that a similar project in Portland, Ore., has generated six times its cost in economic development. In the past few months, officials from New Orleans and Miami have visited Detroit to study the project.

Reinventing Detroit’s manufacturing sector is the next step. That means connecting the dots between the public and private sectors, businesses and universities, and large and small firms. Detroit’s old industrial model was top-down: the Big Three dictated terms to thousands of suppliers, who did what they were told. The new model will be more collaborative. Many of the innovations in high-tech materials, telematics and sensors are happening on campuses or at startups, with the aid of groups like the Michigan Economic Development Corp. The University of Michigan has become a test bed for driverless cars. A new federally funded $148 million high-tech manufacturing institute just opened in Detroit’s Corktown neighborhood.

One could imagine the automakers playing a key role in this resurgence by investing more broadly in local innovation, via their own venture-capital arms. Ford, which acquired a local digital-radio technology startup last fall, is beginning to do just that. It would provide a much needed injection of cash into the city’s innovation economy and offer the automakers a new line of business.

Ultimately, it will take all that and more to ensure that Detroit’s downtown rebirth grows into a boom that is more broadly shared.

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