TIME Aviation

More Pilots in Crashes Are on Drugs, Report Says

Toxicology reports over the last two decades show sharp increase drug use among pilots and in drug mixing as well

More pilots involved in airplane crashes are testing positive for drugs, according to an analysis of toxicology reports going back 20 years by the National Transportation Safety Board.

According to the draft report released Tuesday, in 1990 just 9.6% of pilots involved in crashes tested positive for one drug, compared to 39% in 2012. Drug mixing—which can be an especially dangerous and unpredictable way to consume drugs—has been on the rise as well.

The study crunched the numbers on toxicology reports from nearly 6,700 pilots who were killed in airplane crashes between 1990 and 2012. The study looked at the use of both legal and illegal drugs and found increases in the use of all drugs.

Alcohol was not considered in the study.

The most commonly used drug that can cause impairment was diphenhydramine, a sedative antihistamine used in cold medicine and other related applications. Few pilots tested positive for illegal drugs, the report says, but the percentage of pilots who tested positive for marijuana increased over the study period, mostly in the last 10 years.

Because the vast majority of airplane crashes involve non-commercial flights, more than 90% of the pilots tested were private pilots rather than commercial air carrier pilots.

TIME White House

Biden Calls Domestic Violence the ‘Ugliest Form of Violence’

Vice President Joe Biden commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act at the National Archives in Washington on Sept. 9, 2014.
Susan Walsh—AP Vice President Joe Biden commemorates the 20th Anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act at the National Archives in Washington on Sept. 9, 2014.

On 20th anniversary of Violence Against Women Act

Vice President Joe Biden said Tuesday that there is still much work to be done to protect women from violence, despite the strides that have been made in the 20 years since the Violence Against Women Act passed.

“We’re not going to succeed until America embraces the idea that no man has a right to raise his hand to a woman except for in self defense… that no means no, whether it’s in the bedroom or in the back of a car. Rape is rape,” Biden said during a commemorative event at the National Archives. “Until we reach that point we’re not going to succeed.”

Biden, who was at the time a Senator, drafted the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 and was instrumental in its passage and implementation. The 20th anniversary came just as a video of NFL star Ray Rice hitting his wife as garnered national headlines and led to his suspension from the team.

Biden said much has changed in the years since VAWA passed, including VAWA itself, which has been reauthorized three times since 1994. The law provides prosecutorial protection and support for women who are victims of violence, and was later expanded to include unmarried women and the LGBT community.

Biden said Tuesday that more change will come, “when everyone understands that even one case is too many.”

TIME real estate

A Manhattan Parking Spot Now Runs You a Cool $1 Million

Because it's all about location

A new luxury development in New York City is pushing Manhattan’s gilded real estate market to new heights.

Some parking spaces in the development will be selling for $1 million a pop, the New York Times reports, in a city where every square foot of space is fast becoming a luxury.

The new housing unit rising above the cobblestoned streets of the SoHo neighborhood will sell 10 parking spaces in its basement at a rate of $5,000 to $6,500 a square foot, or a few thousand dollars more than the three-bedroom apartments upstairs. Because parking, perhaps even more so than real estate, is all about location, location, location.

[NYT]

TIME women

A Veteran Campaigner Reflects on 20 Years of Fighting Domestic Abuse

Teen Dating Violence Panel
Kris Connor—Getty Images Esta Soler speaks during the Teen Dating Violence panel at the Rayburn House Office Building on February 28, 2012 in Washington, DC.

Esta Soler, who advocated for the Violence Against Women Act to become law in 1994, talks to TIME about the NFL, rape culture, and how to tackle abuse

Esta Soler, a veteran crusader in the fight to protect women and children from domestic violence, has a saying that “movements are made of moments.” One such moment came 20 years ago, when the media firestorm surrounding the OJ Simpson murder case lent urgency to Congress’s efforts to pass the Violence Against Women Act of 1994. And now, as the U.S. prepares to commemorate two decades since the VAWA’s historic passage, so it is again. At least, so the president of nonprofit Futures Without Violence hopes.

Over 30 years ago, Soler, a leading expert in violence prevention, founded the San-Francisco based organization the Family Violence Project (later renamed Futures Without Violence), which was one of the driving forces behind the passage of the 1994 Violence Against Women Act. Over the years, the organization has led educational efforts, worked with lawmakers, and trained law enforcement on how to better address the issue of domestic abuse. On Tuesday, Soler joined Vice President Biden and many others in commemorating the work that has been done since the VAWA’s passage in 1994.

But the fact that the day’s headlines have been dominated by the dismissal of running back Ray Rice from the Baltimore Ravens for knocking his now-wife unconscious strikes Soler as moment to reflect on unfinished business. “We’re celebrating 20 years since the passage of the act,” Soler tells TIME. “And a lot of good has happened in that time. But this is a stark reminder of how much we still need to do.”

Much has changed in the 20 years since the Violence Against Women Act became law, with incidences of domestic abuse becoming markedly less frequent. Between 1993 and 2010, the rate of intimate partner violence declined by 67%, according to a White House fact sheet. The rate of women being murdered by men in single victim/single offender incidents has also fallen, by 26% between 1996 and 2012, according to a new report from the Violence Policy Center.

That’s partly because there’s a new openness among women and men to address incidences of violence at home. The National Domestic Violence Hotline has received over 3 million calls since 1996, and 92% of callers admit it’s their first call for help. In the late 80s and early 90s, when Soler was working to launch a nationwide campaign using the slogan there’s “no excuse” for abuse, “domestic violence was called a domestic dispute,” she says. “People just excused the behavior.” Passing VAWA, she says, “was a statement that this country and our policymakers were taking the issue of violence against women seriously… For me, that was the main victory.”

But Soler knows there’s work still to be done. For proof, she needn’t look much further than the initial response of the National Football League to Rice’s beating of his wife. Though the running back was released by the Baltimore Ravens following the video leak, he initially received a two-game suspension—a softer punishment than players who have violated drug policies have received. And while two players, the Carolina Panthers’ Greg Hardy and the San Francisco 49ers Ray McDonald have been arrested (and in Hardy’s case, convicted) for domestic violence, both joined their teams on the field last Sunday.

The movement to continue the fight to protect women and children from violence—and more importantly, keep it from happening in the first place—may have found another moment, Soler says. But it’s not enough to be reactive about such incidents. “While it’s important that we have a strong response system in place once something horrible happens, on the other hand it is not just ok for us to wait for something to happen,” says Soler. “We need to figure out more effectively how to stop this. And be super aggressive about that.”

In an interview with TIME ahead of the 20th Anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act, which is coming up on Sept. 13, Soler laid out 6 things the nation can do right now to address the issue.

Confront College Sexual Assault

“I’m an optimist, and I do believe that violence is learned and you can unlearn it. The fact that we’ve been able to have a real impact on the problem [of domestic abuse] is really significant. The moment today is the crisis we now find ourselves facing on our college campuses. There’s an epidemic of sexual assault on our college campuses. The movement about what is happening is the activism—the student activists of today that are grappling with this problem. Demanding action, demanding better responses to cases once they happen. But also not waiting for a rape to happen. That’s what we need to do now with the Violence Against Women Act, really extending to a programmatic response so that our college campuses are safe.

Bring Young People into the Equation

The Violence Against Women Act and a lot of the work that we’ve done has focused on adults. We need to do a better job for our young people. Most of what we’ve done over the last 25 years is building shelters and rape crisis centers and changing the way our law enforcement and our judiciary responds to these issues, but at the end of the day we’ve got to start much earlier. We’ve got to start with our middle school and our high school kids and give them the tools so that they can have healthy relationships, so that they can go to college and not worry about the fear that they’re going to get raped or sexually abused. And we have to heal our kids. So many kids are still growing up in homes and neighborhoods where they’re seeing violence. You learn violence; it becomes a pattern. We have to interrupt it.

Stand Up to Rape Culture

There’s a crisis of social norms that’s allowing this really bad behavior to exist, but I am somebody who really believes that a cultural norm—if it’s addressed appropriately and comprehensively—can be shifted. There are programs out there that work and we need to make sure that every campus has it. That people understand what consent is. That people understand that it’s not ok no matter what state anyone is in to do this—that the behavior is bad. We have to reintroduce that. We have to take the rape culture down, and I think we can do it. But we can’t do it by having one 15-minute session during orientation week on the first week somebody arrives on college campus. That doesn’t work.

Bring Men into the Conversation

We’ve been a driver of bringing men into this conversation, starting in the late ’90s. After doing some market research, we realized that when we talked to men, men felt divided and not guided into our conversations. The language we used was basically saying you’re either a perpetrator or a perpetrator in waiting as opposed to somebody who is not and also wants to do something right about this. So that’s when we created a national campaign called “coaching into men,” that ended up being a program later that showed conversation men could have with their sons and their daughters about the issue. In partnership with the National High School Athletic Coaches Association we created a program to really deal with the culture of bad relationships, but more importantly find ways to give young men the tools to create healthy relationships. So that when they see something bad they feel that they have the power and the strength to say, stop it. It’s not ok.

Hold Sports Organizations Accountable

It’s important that, like every workforce, every institution that has these problems [be it] the NFL [or] the NBA, grapples with the problem of violence against women in a highly responsible way. Players are seen as role models for the next generation. Our athletes are revered in our society and it’s really important that we give them the tools so that they don’t get in trouble. At this point I think the athletic associations are really grappling with these issues, particularly with the recent incident with Ray Rice and the NFL. The NFL needs a comprehensive program to address violence.

Keep Talking About It

Before the 1980s, we did a count. There were about 150 articles in major newspapers about the issue of domestic violence. In the decades of the 2000s, there were over 7,000. Yes, there are challenges—there are always going to be challenges—but we have support in so many different corners where people are actually trying to figure out how to deal with this. The story isn’t buried somewhere, it’s on the front page. Schools are talking about it. Congress is addressing it. The White House is acting on it. At the end of the day, this isn’t just about what government does. Governmental actions are critical, but you need the private sector and private persons to really push things through.

 

 

TIME Crime

Search Continues for More of Missing Student’s Remains

Police and forensics experts were combing the scene Tuesday for more remains of Tennessee nursing student Holly Bobo, whose bizarre disappearance in 2011 met a major breakthrough over the weekend.

Two hunters on Saturday found a human skull identified as that of 20-year-old Bobo — the first physical evidence of her remains, police said. Forensics experts from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, are “trying to find as much evidence as they can,” Decatur County Sheriff Keith Byrd told NBC News.

A news conference is planned for Tuesday afternoon, where the Bobo family is expected to release a statement…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME NFL

10 Intelligent Tweets About Violence in the NFL

Football players and fans are demanding the NFL to do better

While it’s hard to see positive outcomes in the wake of ex-Ravens running back Ray Rice’s suspension from the league for domestic abuse, the incident has at least inspired an important conversation about how the NFL’s role when it comes to players’ acts of violence off the field.

Here are 10 insightful tweets, from both football players and fans, about how the league needs to address domestic abuse going forward:

See Also: How Twitter has taken a stand with Janay Rice with #WhyIStayed and #WhyILeft

TIME weather

See How Flash Floods Devastated Southwestern States

In a year of record drought, severe flooding submerged parts of Arizona and Nevada on Monday. Roads were closed, homes flooded, and at least one person was killed in the deluge

TIME Education

And the U.S. News & World Report‘s Top College in America Is…

Graduation day
Getty Images

Who gets bragging rights this year?

Princeton and Williams are respectively the best university and liberal arts colleges in America, according to U.S. News & World Report‘s newly released 2015 college rankings.

Princeton took the top spot for the second year in a row, while Williams held onto its position for the 12th straight year. US News & World Report has been ranking America’s higher education institutions for 30 years.

These are U.S. News’ top 10 national universities:

1. Princeton University
2. Harvard University
3. Yale University
4. Columbia University
4. Stanford University
4. University of Chicago
7. Massachusetts Institute of Technology
8. Duke University
8. University of Pennsylvania
10. California Institute of Technology

And here are the declared best national liberal arts colleges:

1. Williams College
2. Amherst College
3. Swarthmore College
4. Wellesley College
5. Bowdoin College
5. Pomona College
7. Middlebury College
7. Carlton College
8. Claremont McKenna College
8. Haverford College

Click here for more rankings, including that of the top public universities in the U.S.

TIME Football

Ray Rice’s Wife Defends Husband, Criticizes NFL

"To make us relive a moment in our lives that we regret every day is a horrible thing," Janay Rice says

The wife of disgraced NFL star Ray Rice defended her husband Tuesday after his suspension from the league for beating her unconscious, criticizing the media and the NFL for creating “a horrible nightmare” in her family’s life.

Janay Rice, whose beating by her husband was captured on a TMZ video leaked Monday, took to her Instagram to describe the pain of reliving a “moment in our lives that we regret every day.” The running back was cut from the Ravens following the release of the video, and he received an indefinite suspension from the NFL.

Her full statement reads:

I woke up this morning feeling like I had a horrible nightmare, feeling like I’m mourning the death of my closest friend. But to have to accept the fact that it’s reality is a nightmare in itself. No one knows the pain that the media & unwanted options from the public has caused my family. To make us relive a moment in our lives that we regret every day is a horrible thing. To take something away from the man I love that he has worked his ass of for all his life just to gain ratings is horrific. THIS IS OUR LIFE! What don’t you all get. If your intentions were to hurt us, embarrass us, make us feel alone, take all happiness away, you’ve succeeded on so many levels. Just know we will continue to grow & show the world what real love is! Ravensnation we love you!

Although Janay’s account was since been made private, a screenshot of the message has been circulating on Twitter:

Janay’s support of her husband and decision to stay in the marriage has garnered significant media attention. Thousands of women have since created a powerful hashtag called #WhyIStayed, explaining why women often remain in abusive relationships.

TIME cities

Ferguson Creates Citizen Review Board to Check Police Conduct

Outrage In Missouri Town After Police Shooting Of 18-Yr-Old Man
Scott Olson—Getty Images Police advance on demonstrators protesting the killing of teenager Michael Brown on August 17, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri.

Ferguson city officials also plan to curb a system of fines and arrest warrants that critics say disproportionately impact poor, black residents

Ferguson City Council announced a raft of reforms on Monday to address police conduct in the Missouri suburb where an unarmed black teenager was shot dead by a police officer last month, and scale back a system of fines and arrests that residents say have fallen disproportionately on low-income, black residents.

The city will establish a citizen review board to offer a public check on police conduct, and will reform municipal tickets and fines that have become the city’s second-greatest source of revenue and made Ferguson an outlier in the state for the number of arrest warrants served per person, the New York Times reports.

City officials will vote to cap the total fines collected by the city, the lack of which critics say has created an incentive to issue more tickets and arrest warrants, and will also offer a window of reprieve for pending arrest warrants.

“The overall goal of these changes is to improve trust within the community and increase transparency, particularly within Ferguson’s courts and police department,” said council member Mark Byrne in a statement.

Ferguson was roiled by sometimes violent protests during August after the killing of black teenager Michael Brown by a police officer. The Department of Justice is among the officials investigating the circumstances of his death.

[NYT]

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