TIME Football

Long Island High Schooler Dies After Football Collision

Tom Cutinella is the third high school football player to have died in recent days.

A Long Island high school junior died late Wednesday after colliding with an opponent in a varsity football game.

Tom Cutinella, a junior at Shoreham-Wading River High School who plays guard/linebacker on the school’s football team, was pronounced dead after sustaining a head injury in the third quarter of the afternoon game, Newsday reports.

Cutinella was hospitalized after the hit and placed in the intensive-care unit after undergoing surgery. His death came as a shock to the community and to the 60 friends, relatives and teammates waiting in the hospital, Newsday reports.

“We’re a small community and we’re all devastated,” Jack Costas, a member of the Shoreham-Wading River school board told Newsday. “It’s always tragic when someone so young and so full of life has their life ended. It’s going to be a very, very difficult road ahead from this.”

The risks of injury and death in football have come under increasing scrutiny in the wake of tragic deaths of high school football players and growing evidence that the game can have long-term effects on professional players. Two other high school student players have died of potentially football-related injuries since Friday, according to ESPN.

[Newsday]

TIME ebola

Man in Isolation in Possible Hawaii Ebola Case

Ebola
Getty Images

"It's still an if. This is not a 'for sure' thing."

A man is being treated in isolation in Hawaii for what health officials say is a potential Ebola case, local ABC affiliate KITV reported Thursday, though he could be sick with some other ailment.

Authorities stress that they are being especially cautious amid concerns over the deadly virus, two days after the first confirmed case in the United States was identified in Texas. They did not release details about the patient or the hospital where he is being treated, according to KITV.

“The hospital is being very careful, as they should be, to take precautions making sure the patient is in isolation and making sure the people and the public stay safe,” Dr. Melissa Viray, an official with the Hawaii Department of Health, told KITV. “That being said, it’s still an if. This is not a ‘for sure’ thing.”

Health officials in Texas are tracking down anyone who may have come into contact with the Ebola patient in Texas and monitoring a second potential case. The virus has infected more than 7,200 people primarily in Western Africa and killed more 3,300 in the worst Ebola outbreak on record.

[KITV]

TIME politics

Cornel West: Obama Administration Is a ‘Drone Presidency’

"I think he's settled for the middle ground rather than the higher ground"

Famed public intellectual Cornel West, whose new book Black Prophetic Fire is a re-examination of key black political figures through a different lens, was initially a big supporter of Barack Obama and appeared with him during his first presidential campaign. But in 2012, West says he didn’t even vote. “I couldn’t vote for a war criminal,” he said, calling Obama’s administration a “drone presidency.”

In an interview with Time for 10 Questions, which can be read here, the always outspoken West said the President lacks courage. “I think he lacks backbone,” he says. “I think he’s settled for the middle ground rather than the higher ground.”

One example of that, he explains, is the way Obama addresses young black men, which West characterizes as “paternalistic,” and very unlike the subservient way he deals with Wall Street. “When you say your major program for black young boys is going to be one of charity and philanthropy but no public policy, no justice, then criticism must be put forward just to be true to the black prophetic tradition,” he said.

The Obama legacy, West says, is contrast to the black leaders in the book, such as Malcolm X, whom West says, “specialized in ‘de-n___izing’ black people”–that is, he clarifies, encouraged them not to “be intimidated, afraid, and so scared of speaking [their] mind and allowing [their] soul to be manifest that [they] defer to the powers that be, especially the white supremacist powers.”

West, who’s no stranger to controversy, is currently a professor at Union Theological Seminary. He’s hoping to draw as many young people as he can to a rally in Ferguson, Missouri, on Oct. 13, to protest the killing of Michael Brown by police there. “It’s a beautiful thing to see the young people in Ferguson and all across the nation, organizing there.”

TIME Economy

Why Everyone Who Lives in Alaska Is Getting $1,884 Today

North slope oil rush Alaska
Ralph Crane&—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images The North slope oil rush in Alaska, circa 1969

That's enough to buy a trip to somewhere warmer

If polar bears and Snow Dogs weren’t enough to make you want to move to Alaska, consider this: You can get paid thousands of dollars a year just for living there.

Today, Oct. 2, almost every permanent resident of Alaska — even babies — will get paid $1,884 as a dividend from the state’s Alaska Permanent Fund, a government fund that invests proceeds generated from the state’s oil reserves to ensure future wealth for the state.

When the first dividend checks were issued to residents in 1980, TIME predicted that the windfall would be long-lasting:

Nor is there any end in sight to the flow of dividends from the oil fund, which by the end of this year is expected to total more than $1 billion. Oil price increases could also continue to swell the fund. While most Americans complain bitterly every time OPEC members raise prices, Alaskans have reason to applaud. With the price of domestic oil now decontrolled, Alaskan crude can rise to the world level; thus the state’s royalties will grow with each foreign price hike.

Today the Alaska Permanent Fund is valued above $50 billion, and the dividend paid to residents this week will total $1.1 billion.

And for the individual who’s squirreled away his dividend payment each year since the program launched in 1980? He’s made a cool $37,000 just for being loyal to the state.

Read more about the origins of the Alaska Permanent Fund in TIME’s archives: Alaska Bonanza

TIME Crime

WATCH: Florida Police Officer Tasers Unarmed 62-Year-Old Woman in Back

He has been put on administrative leave with pay pending an investigation

A Florida police officer is under investigation after he was caught on camera firing a Taser into the back of a 62-year-old woman.

Terry Mahan of the Tallahassee Police Department was with colleagues responding to reports of brazen narcotics sales on Tuesday afternoon when the incident occurred.

Three people were arrested at the scene, after which a woman, Viola Young, approached the squad car apparently to inquire about one of the detainees.

She was advised to stay back, according to a police statement Wednesday, and an altercation ensued. At one point Mahan yanked Young’s arm and then fired the Taser as she attempted to walk away.

Tallahassee Police chief Michael DeLeo said that the video was strong enough evidence to put Mahan on administrative leave with pay pending an investigation.

“We will conduct a thorough investigation into this incident,” he said. “We want to be transparent with the community by sharing what we can at this point, including the video.”

Neither Young nor the three others arrested have been charged with any drugs offenses.

TIME technology

Google Gives San Francisco Free Wi-Fi in Public Places

Jose Aguirre San Francisco's Civic Center Plaza, a site of many local gatherings and rallies, is among the locations in the city that have free Wi-Fi as of Wednesday, Oct. 1.

Organizations are working hard to promote exactly this kind of public-private partnership in the city

On Wednesday, San Franciscans were able to hook their gadgets up to free Wi-Fi that launched in 32 new public locations. All that connectivity was funded by a $608,000 check from Google, in a move that could be seen as the tech behemoth taking steps to foster goodwill amid complaints of rapid gentrification fueled by the tech boom of Silicon Valley.

The free WiFi now available in San Francisco’s playgrounds, recreation centers, plazas and parks also fits in with the company’s long-standing promotion of Internet access in the U.S. and around the world. But lately politicians have more urgently encouraged big tech companies to show serious generosity, in both talent and funds, hoping to ameliorate the tensions that led to protests around “Google buses” earlier in the year.

In this case, after being approached by Mark Farrell, a member of San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors, Google agreed to underwrite his plan for complimentary hotspots through a partnership with sf.citi, an organization working hard to promote these feel-good public-private partnerships. Google already gave a $6.8 million gift to the city earlier this year, to pay for bus fares of working-class youths.

In an interview conducted last winter, Mayor Ed Lee told TIME that the angst felt toward tech companies bringing an influx of new workers to the city was “perhaps misguided,” partly given the great things that sector is doing for the economy. He added that he had long been working with tech leaders to “be good philanthropic companies” and take part in “the culture of contributing to the society around them.”

On Wednesday, Lee celebrated a victory in bringing San Franciscans of various classes together. “WiFi in our city’s parks is another step toward a larger vision of connectivity for our city as a whole, bridging the digital divide and ensuring that our diverse communities have access to innovation,” he said in a statement.

TIME Crime

Michael Phelps Had Blood Alcohol Nearly Double Legal Limit

SWIM-PANPACS-AUS-USA
Patrick Hamilton—AFP/Getty Images American swimmer Michael Phelps competes during the men's 4 x 100m individual medley final in Gold Coast, Australia, on Aug. 24, 2014

Phelps reportedly told an officer "that's not happening" when the Olympian was asked to stand on one leg

Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps reportedly had a blood alcohol level nearly double the legal limit when he was pulled over by Maryland police on Tuesday. Phelps had a blood alcohol level of .14, the Baltimore Sun reports based on documents that paper obtained Wednesday. He was later arrested and charged with driving under the influence.

Phelps reportedly failed two roadside sobriety tests before completely giving up on the third. “That’s not happening,” the 29-year-old is said to have told an officer who asked him to try standing on one leg.

Tuesday’s incident was the 22-time Olympic medalist’s second DUI. In 2004, Phelps pleaded guilty to driving drunk and served 18 months probation. Phelps released an apology in a series of tweets on Tuesday, saying in part “I am deeply sorry to everyone I have let down.”

[Baltimore Sun]

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