TIME Crime

5 Teens Charged Over Ice Bucket Challenge Prank on Autistic Boy

The victim's mother had encouraged people to share the video to help catch those involved

Five Cleveland teens were charged Tuesday after dumping a bucket filled with urine, tobacco spit and water on a 15-year-old autistic boy in a cruel twist on the viral ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.

The teens, whose ages range from 14 to 16, were charged in juvenile court for assault, delinquency and disorderly conduct, according to the Columbus Dispatch.

The incident, which occurred on Aug. 18, had been reported to police in early September after the victim’s mother found a video of it on her son’s cellphone. In an effort to track down the perpetrators, she encouraged media outlets and viewers to share the video, which has since amassed over 400,000 views on YouTube.

Dean Valore, the attorney representing the victim’s family, said that while the boy and his family were scarred by the ordeal, their situation has benefitted from an outpouring of support.

“He wants to be a normal kid,” Valore said. “He wants to fit in and he wants to have friends.”

[Columbus Dispatch]

Read next: Here’s How the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Actually Started

TIME Accident

Firefighter Injured While Doing Ice Bucket Challenge Dies

Ice Bucket Challenge-Firefighters Hurt
A Campbellsville Fire Department truck with the ladder extended remained at the scene where two firefighters were injured during an ice bucket challenge during a fundraiser for ALS on Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014, in Campbellsville, Ky. Dylan Lovan—AP

Tony Girder was too close to a power line last month when he helped students participate in an Ice Bucket Challenge

One of four firefighters hurt last month as they helped college students take part in an Ice Bucket Challenge has died of his injuries.

The killed firefighter, Tony Grider, suffered an electric shock when his fire truck’s ladder got too close to a power line. The incident happened shortly after the firefighters poured cold water on Campbellsville University students in Kentucky, the Associated Press reported last month.

Grider, 41, had been with the Campbellsville Fire Department for 16 years, reports WLKY Louisville. He is survived by five children and his wife, Gena.

[WLKY Louisville]

TIME celebrity

Of Course Kim Kardashian Took a Selfie While Doing the Ice Bucket Challenge

Exactly what you'd expect from her

Kim Kardashian has finally participated in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, in which people get doused in ice water and post video proof online or donate to ALS research as part of a viral fundraising effort that has raised more than $100 million.

Kardashian, who is married to Kanye West and stars in Keeping up with the Kardashians, made the challenge her own by taking one of her signature selfies as Ellen DeGeneres dumped a bucket of ice water over the reality TV star’s head on The Ellen Show. Just before she got soaked, the “selfie queen” exclaimed, “Oh my god, I don’t even want to see this happening to me.”

Also, there’s a lot of screaming, so you may want to turn the volume down on your computer before you watch the above clip.

Here’s another view that Kardashian posted on her Instagram.

No word on whether the selfie will be in Selfish, her upcoming book on selfies due out April 2015.

TIME society

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Donations Just Topped $100 Million

More than 3 million people have donated

Donations from the Ice Bucket Challenge broke the $100 million mark Friday as people around world continue to dump ice on their heads and donate to the ALS Association to help combat Lou Gehrig’s disease.

“The word gratitude doesn’t do enough to express what we are feeling right now,” ALS President and CEO Barbara Newhouse said in a statement.

The $100 million in donations came from more than 3 million donors who have contributed since the challenge went viral in late July. The ALS Association raised only $2.8 million in the same period last year.

The Ice Bucket Challenge has been a social media phenomenon, grabbing the attention of millions of Americans including many celebrities and political figures. Some have speculated that it might forever change the way charities approach fundraising.

TIME viral

Watch Stephen Hawking Do the Ice Bucket Challenge

Physicist Stephen Hawking, who had pneumonia last year, said it “would not be wise for me to have a bucket of cold water poured over [him]” — referring to the viral fundraising effort in which people dump ice water over themselves or donate money to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) research. Instead, his children, Robert, Lucy and Tim, volunteered themselves as his proxies.

Hawking, who’s nearly totally paralyzed after being diagnosed with ALS at 21, urged everyone to donate to the Motor Neurone Disease Association to “eliminate this terrible disease.”

According to the ALS Association, the viral fundraising effort has raised about $95 million so far.

TIME health

The Real Ice Bucket Challenge

What’s harder than dumping freezing water on your head? Repeating this kind of success

One of the most viral philanthropic social-media campaigns in history has reached our family too. We were about to board an international flight when both of my children were called out by their friends on Facebook to accept the Ice Bucket Challenge for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the deadly neurological condition commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

My kids are no strangers to ALS. Our neighbor has it, and my daughter is a student at Boston College, the alma mater of Pete Frates, the young man whose fight inspired the challenge. But I don’t recall talking about ALS as a family before, and I doubt either of my kids had ever discussed it with their friends. Like most other rare diseases, ALS doesn’t often find itself in the spotlight.

At 30,000 ft., we talked for the first time about the devastation ALS brings and what is being done about it. We watched countless videos of friends who had stepped up to the Ice Bucket Challenge. And within hours of landing, they too had dumped icy water–and uploaded the proof. We watched together in amazement as, within days, everyone from George W. Bush to Taylor Swift got soaked in the name of charity.

So fun! So creative! So … effective. Why didn’t the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF), the cancer-research organization I started when I was diagnosed with the disease, think up something like this? my kids asked. I had no answer, only the wish that we had.

So far, the social-media craze has raised a whopping $94.3 million for the ALS Association since the end of July. That’s up from $2.7 million in the same period last year. And that’s just one of many ALS-focused organizations to have seen such a windfall.

As brilliantly simple as the Ice Bucket Challenge is, its phenomenal success is making many of us think hard about new ways to raise awareness and dollars.

The efficiency of the campaign, for one, is awe-inspiring. The only overhead the ALS Association incurred was the cost and staff time of drafting and then sending a single email to 60,000 people in its database. The campaign also demonstrated the power of one or two people who care passionately about a cause. After all, the Ice Bucket Challenge wasn’t started by the ALS Association or a PR agency but by young people who wanted to support their friend with ALS.

For me, the biggest takeaway of all is the need to engage a younger generation of potential donors. A recent report showed that in 2012, 75% of 20-to-35-year-olds had donated to philanthropies the year before, and another 70% were more than willing to ask their friends and relatives to do the same. Millennial enthusiasm can make things go viral, sometimes massively so. The results speak for themselves.

But now that the money has been raised, a potentially harder challenge is emerging. Many people are questioning what the ALS Association will do with such an extraordinary influx of money. In my view, the opportunities are endless.

As is the case for most rare diseases, progress in ALS research has been severely hamstrung by funding shortages. There are few treatments–none of them effective–and a cure for the disease remains elusive. The ALS community’s windfall will dramatically change that landscape. Simply put: science that was never before imaginable is now possible.

This will no doubt create a groundswell of interest in ALS research. It will attract new scientists to the field who may not otherwise have been interested in the disease but who have to follow the funding. And it will pique the interest of pharma and biotech companies, which may not otherwise have had the incentive to pursue R&D for such a relatively small patient population.

Making the most of each dollar means developing milestones for every project funded and communicating these results back to donors. Over time, this will help turn the 1.9 million new donors captured through the Ice Bucket Challenge into repeat donors.

Watching how the campaign has unfolded so far has already prompted us at the MMRF to think of new ways to more effectively raise dollars. My hope is that long after the Ice Bucket Challenge dries up, other disease-based nonprofits will be inspired by how the ALS community stewards the funds raised this summer and continues to build support for curing such a cruel disease.

Giusti is founder and executive chairman of the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

TIME viral

David Lynch Plays Trumpet in Ice Bucket Challenge, Nominates Putin

Exactly what you'd expect from the director

As the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge makes its way around the globe, it was only a matter of time until it eventually came around to director David Lynch. Naturally, the man who brought us Blue Velvet, Eraserhead and Elephant Man interpreted the fundraising and awareness-raising exercise in a very David Lynchian way.

Challenged by Laura Dern (who starred in his film Wild at Heart) to dump iced coffee over his head, the director dumped a double shot of espresso into a bucket of ice water and proceeded to play “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” on the trumpet until someone drenched him with the jumbo iced Americano. It was an odd cinematic moment that still managed to makes more sense than Mulholland Drive.

Lynch made the video a two-for-one deal, as he was also nominated for the stunt by The Leftovers star Justin Theroux. Still soaking from the original dousing, Lynch had another bucket dumped on him, disappointingly with just plain old ice water.

As water dripped down his face, Lynch passed the nomination forward. To Vladimir Putin.

MORE: Matt Damon Uses Toilet Water for His Ice Bucket Challenge

MORE: Superman Proves He’s Superman By Hardly Wincing During The Ice Bucket Challenge

TIME viral

Toddler Completes Ice Bucket Challenge, Nominates Dora the Explorer

Your move, Dora.

By now, it seems just about everyone – celebrities, politicians, dogs — has participated in the Ice Bucket Challenge, the massively viral phenomenon raising money for ALS research. (The ALS Association says it has now raised more than $90 million to combat the disease.)

You might be a little sick of watching videos of people dumping water over their heads, but we recommend taking 45 seconds to watch the one above, uploaded by YouTuber Mike Weber. It features an adorable 2-year-old named Ashley who dons a pair of goggles and gamely completes the challenge. She nominates a few members of her family, and then also nominates Barbie and Dora the Explorer.

Your move, Dora.

TIME Television

Watch Homer Simpson Take the Ice Bucket Challenge

D'oh!

Homer Simpson is jumping on the Ice Bucket Challenge bandwagon.

The clip parodies the movement that’s dominated social media in recent weeks, in which people dump ice water on themselves to raise money and awareness for research into ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Homer dumps a tiny cup of water on himself and pretends to suffer: “But it was all worth it to raise awareness for ALS.” But then his kids raise the stakes, finding something a bit more frigid to dump on Homer.

TIME viral

Superman Proves He’s Superman By Hardly Wincing During The Ice Bucket Challenge

Henry Cavill and Amy Adams get doused multiple times

On the set of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, multiple buckets and trash cans of ice water were dumped over Henry Cavill — who was in his Superman costume — and Amy Adams (Lois Lane).

The video is part of the “Ice Bucket Challenge,” a viral fundraising effort that has raised nearly $90 million by encouraging people to dump ice water over their heads on camera or donate $100 to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) research (or both, as lots of celebrities have done).

In the video, Amy Adams said she was nominated by actor Darren Le Gallo and challenged her siblings to do it next.

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