TIME Gadgets

How to Set Up Apple Pay on Your iPhone or iPad

Get ready to shop like you never have before

Apple Pay, the newest “next big thing” out of Cupertino, hits shopping carts across the U.S. Monday both online and in stores. Paying with a swipe of your smartphone? That sounds like the stuff of the future. Or the stuff of Android phones since 2011. Or the stuff of Japan as far back as 2004. Regardless, it’s still a welcome leap for the 42.4% of American smartphone users who own an iPhone.

Here’s how to set up Apple Pay, the company’s new cashless, cardless way to pay.

Step 1: Get the right iDevice.

To use Apple Pay, you’ll need one of Apple’s latest devices, either an iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPad Air 2, or iPad Mini 3. (Funny how it always works like that.) Older Apple mobile devices lack the new Secure Element chip, which encrypts and stores all the user’s payment information. So, even though the iPhone 5S has Touch ID, owners of that device still need to pay the old-fashioned way.

People with new iPhones can use Apple Pay for online transactions and in-store payments, while the iPads announced last week can only use the service for web purchases. That’s because the iPhones have a built-in Near Field Communication (NFC) antenna, which let users pay with a wave of the smartphone, while Apple’s tablets still lack NFC.

Step 2: Download the iOS 8.1 Update

Next, you’ll have to update your iPhone’s operating system to iOS 8.1, due to be released Monday. Not to be confused with iOS 8.0.1, the update that crippled thousands of iPhones in its brief reign of terror, iOS 8.1 includes an array of anticipated features, like Apple Pay and the return of the Camera Roll.

Step 3: Open the Passbook App

Flick to the barren wasteland of your second or third homepage — or wherever else you’ve stuffed Passbook, since like most people, you probably rarely use it. Upon opening the app to set up Apple Pay, it will ask if you want to use your credit or debit card already on file for iTunes purchases or add a new card.

Step 4: Pick a Card, Not Quite Any Card

For those of you who opt not to use your iTunes account, Apple Pay currently works with Visa, Mastercard, and American Express. If you’re nervous about this newfangled technology, but too tempted to stay away, it might be wise to use a credit instead of a debit card so you won’t be out any cash should things go awry.

A cadre of cooperating banks were revealed at the service’s unveiling, including Bank of America, Barclays, Capital One, Chase, Citibank, Navy Federal Credit Union, PNC, US Bank, USAA, and Wells Fargo. If your bank isn’t listed here, it still may be a part of the service. Everyone wants to party with Apple, and other banks have signed on since the service’s announcement in September.

When you ask Passbook to load a new card into Apple Pay, it activates your iPhone’s camera and prompts you to snap a photo of your card. Apple analyzes this image and interacts with your bank to confirm that it indeed belongs to you. Once that magic happens, a generic-looking image of your card appears in your Passbook app. Just tap on it when you want to use it.

It’s worth noting that the Passbook app doesn’t display your card number. Apple doesn’t even actually store your credit card number, nor does it give the number to merchants. Instead, Apple Pay creates a “device-only account number” which is stored on your device’s Secure Element chip. Every time you use Apple Pay, Apple issues a one-time payment number and a dynamic security code — both encrypted — to the bank. And not only does Apple not know what you bought, where you bought it, or how much you paid for it, but cashiers won’t be able to see your name, credit card number or your card’s security code when you making in-store purchases — a big improvement in real-world security.

Step 5: Shop

If you want to put your iPhone to the real world retail test immediately, there are already 220,000 locations ready to take Apple Pay. According to Apple, every Macy’s/Bloomingdales, McDonalds, Staples, Subway, Walgreens/DuaneReade, and Whole Foods are among the retailers already equipped to accept these contactless payments. And, of course, Apple Stores are also ready to take your money. Just wave your phone at the NFC terminal, touch your iPhone’s Touch ID sensor and wave your money goodbye.

Apple Pay

Meanwhile, shopping online sounds a little more complicated. Every online purchase demonstrated in the Apple Pay presentation went through an iOS app. So, whether you’re buying something from Target, accepting an offer from Groupon, or ordering a sandwich from Panera Bread, you’ll need to download the company’s app first. It’s unclear at this time if you will be able to use Apple Pay when shopping through a mobile browser like Safari or Chrome. But given Apple’s app-centric view of the Internet, I wouldn’t put any money on it.

But there is a plus side: in exchange for downloading and using these apps, after you pay with your fingerprint on the Touch ID sensor, you don’t have to enter your billing or shipping address, which can be a drag — especially when you’re shopping online using an iPhone or iPad.

Read next: These Are the Stores That Accept Apple Pay

TIME Video Games

Is This Really the Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare Launch Trailer?

Activision's near-future military adventure starring Kevin Spacey as the head of a rogue private military company arrives in just a few more weeks.

I don’t see a lot of gameplay in this pithy less-than-a-minute trailer, so I’m not sure why Activision’s calling it a “gameplay” trailer. Just excise that word and it works: type “Official Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare Launch Trailer” and you’re golden. But by using the designator “gameplay,” I’m betting it’s not the last “launch trailer” we’ll see.

When I first glimpsed it on Saturday, the trailer had 300+ views. Now it has over 5.3 million. It’ll doubtless double that in another 48 hours. That’s the power of a Call of Duty.

There’s a little more to see here, but it’s not much. The same clips already shown in previous trailers pop in, abridged. The new stuff–and is it all new stuff? I can’t tell–amounts to 1-2 second clips of people in EXO suits doing impossible things, each of which Call of Duty-philes will obsess over.

The game is out November 4 (November 3 for Day Zero edition buyers) for this- and last-gen PlayStation and Xbox systems as well as Windows. It looks terrific in this trailer, a collage of rainbow-plaited tracers and pluming squibs and mo-cap Kevin Spacey smirking in a suit. And I’m still hopeful that, though it’s clearly rooted in the ballistic-power-fantasy school of design, the game has some subversive fictive tricks up its sleeve.

It’s one of these what-games-can-be questions for me (and I include the storytelling angle in my definition of “game” here–it’s a holistic thing). I’m definitely not from the “Who cares about the narrative, does it shoot good?” school of thought. If Beau Willimon and David Fincher can use an actor like Kevin Spacey to tell a politically nuanced tale that slyly comments on current affairs, why can’t a piece of interactive entertainment starring Kevin Spacey do the same?

TIME career

Microsoft CEO Says He Was ‘Completely Wrong’ to Suggest Women Shouldn’t Ask for Raises

Satya Nadella had previously apologized for his remarks

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said in a new interview that he was “completely wrong” to suggest it’s “good karma” for women to wait for a raise instead of asking for one.

“It’s been a very humbling and learning experience for me,” Nadella told CNBC in his first interview since his initial comments drew outrage.

Nadella said anyone held back in their career by gender bias should push back against their managers, and that he had wrongly extrapolated the advice from his own experiences.

“I basically took my own approach to how I’ve approached my career and sprung it on half of humanity,” he said.

Nadella had previously apologized for his remarks in a letter to the company.

“I believe men and women should get equal pay for equal work,” he wrote. “If you think you deserve a raise, you should just ask.”

See the interview below.

[CNBC]

 

 

TIME technology

Why Apple Pay May Be the Company’s Most Challenging Move Yet

For Apple Pay to work, Apple needs to get customers, retailers and banks all in lockstep

Our smartphones have already become our de facto camera, music player, navigational device and personal assistant. Now Silicon Valley wants to make them our wallet, too.

Several tech firms have spent the last few years trying to convince consumers their phone is a more convenient payment method than cash or plastic. Most shoppers have balked. But on Monday, Apple is entering the fray, and experts say that could be a turning point for the long-hyped mobile payments industry.

Apple’s service, dubbed Apple Pay, allows customers to buy goods in physical stores with a simple tap of their iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus or Apple Watch smartwatch, when that device hits shelves in early 2015. Apple Pay users load their credit card information onto the phone, then press their device’s Touch ID fingerprint scanner in the checkout line to authenticate the purchase. The process is faster than using a debit card — and more secure. Apple generates a unique ID number for each transaction, meaning users’ credit card data numbers are not shared with merchants.

Apple Pay is launching just as the smartphone is becoming a central point of commerce for the average shopper. Consumers spent $110 billion via their mobile devices last year, according to research firm Euromonitor, and they used their phones plenty more to research products before buying them in stores. Meanwhile, person-to-person payment apps like Venmo have made people comfortable loading their phones with dollars to make simple transactions.

“All of that is really conditioning consumers to trust their phones when it comes to payments,” says Michelle Evans, a senior consumer finance analyst at Euromonitor.

But consumers are still reluctant to give up their credit cards. Mobile payments generated $4.9 billion in sales in 2014, a paltry figure compared to the year’s $4.8 trillion in card transactions, according to Euromonitor. Google’s own mobile payments service, Google Wallet, offers much of Apple Pay’s functionality but hasn’t seen widespread adoption. Startup Square abandoned its much-hyped mobile wallet platform earlier this year, instead pivoting to an order-ahead service like Seamless. PayPal, which is spinning off from eBay in 2015, has also struggled find a mobile formula that works in stores.

“It’s definitely starting to catch on, but I don’t think anybody has quite nailed the overarching reason to pull out your phone to pay,” says Anuj Nayar, PayPal’s senior director of global initiatives.

The transition to mobile payments is a challenging one because it requires buy-in from so many different players. Consumers have to be convinced it’s worth their time to learn a new buying behavior. Retailers have to pay for new equipment so their point-of-sale systems can accept payment from phones and smartwatches. Banks and credit card issuers also have to buy in. “It’s a lot of people to get in lockstep,” says Evans.

Apple does have a few key advantages over its competitors. The company has a knack for convincing people to change their digital lifestyles, whether by downloading MP3s, surfing the web on a phone or using a large tablet to watch videos. And thanks to the iTunes Store, Apple has more than 500 million credit cards already on file. Those customers will be able to seamlessly start using the same accounts they use to buy apps and music to buy goods in the real world when they first boot up Apple Pay. “We’ve never had this large of a base in a starting country” for a mobile payment system, says Matt Dill, Visa’s senior vice president for Innovation & Strategic Partnerships, Commerce and Network Payments.

However, analysts say convincing shoppers to give up credit cards, which are already fairly painless to use, will take more than just offering convenience. The most successful mobile payments platform to date is the Starbucks app, which rewards customers who pay via their phones with free drinks and other perks. Today, Starbucks processes about 15% of all its transactions on the app, or about 6 million per week.

“The customers really feel It’s not just about payments,” says Ben Straley, Starbucks’ vice president for digital products. “It’s also about being rewarded for their loyalty.”

But even if Apple can convince consumers to take their money mobile, some merchants aren’t playing ball. Wal-Mart, America’s largest retailer, won’t support Apple Pay at launch. Instead, it and other big-box stores like Best Buy are developing a competing mobile payments platform called CurrentC, set to launch sometime next year. Such merchants would have to be the driving force behind any effective loyalty rewards program that convinced shoppers to abandon their credit cards.

With so many competitors offering mobile payment options, analysts expect the segment will finally take off soon. Euromonitor projects in-store purchases via phone will rise to $74 billion by 2019 — though that’s still a far cry from the trillions in card purchases we see today. Mobile devices are already becoming a common tool for buying things in the virtual world. It could very well happen in the real world, too. “It’s just shopping, whether you’re buying it in a store or buying it online,” says PayPal’s Nayar. “The lines between what that looks like have started to disappear.”

Read next: Apple Pay Starts Monday for iPhone 6 Users

TIME technology

The Comic Sans Typewriter Is Finally Here

It's only a generation late

We’ve all had this thought: Why can’t my typewriter use the Comic Sans typeface?

Well, if you like Comic Sans, you may have had that thought, anyway. And if you have a typewriter.

But designer Jesse England seems to fit the bill. After reading a typewritten document, he realized there was nothing stopping him from giving a typewriter the most annoying font ever created. So he invented the Sincerity Machine, etching Comic Sans letters with a laser engraver and gluing them onto a 1970s Brother Charger 11 typewriter.

England is sympathetic to the font. “While making it, I thought a lot about the Comic Sans typeface and how ridiculed it is. But it is also a mark of sincerity for those who do not have graphic design experience. I’m not particularly enamored with this font, but I don’t think it deserves the flak it gets.”

TIME apps

Flickr Finally Made an iPad App

iPad users can ditch Flickr's mobile website

Flickr is now offering an app for iPad, parent company Yahoo announced Saturday.

Flickr on the Apple iPad Flickr/App Store

The first iPad-ready app fir the photo sharing service, it offers iPad-optimized layouts and live filters to improve photos and videos. Designed for Apple’s new iOS 8, the app also has a new search function that Flickr says makes it easier for users to search through their library.

Previously, iPad users had to use Flickr’s mobile website, which offered an often less than stellar photo-browsing experience. Flickr already has an iPhone-specific app.

The Flickr for iPad app is available for a free download in the App Store.

TIME Apple

It’s Time to Seriously Start Expecting an Apple TV Again

159078767
Images by Fabio—Getty Images/Flickr RF

Everything finally looks like it is falling into place

Apple’s Oct. 16 “It’s been way too long” event was supposed to be all about updating products that hadn’t been refreshed in a while. And it was. The Cupertino, Calif. company unveiled svelte new iPads, an ultra-high-resolution version of the iMac, an updated Mac mini, and a slew of software and service updates. CEO Tim Cook also said that a software development kit to help programmers make applications for the company’s upcoming smartwatch would be available in November, ahead of the much-anticipated device’s 2015 debut.

About ten minutes into his opening remarks, Cook put up an evolution of man-style slide showing Apple’s line of products, from the Watch through iPhone and iPad, laptops and desktops. (Scrub to 10:00 here to see it.) One could easily imagine the same slide with an additional product on the far right: a television. That is a rumor that has been around for so long, that it’s frankly grown tedious to think or talk about. Steve Jobs told biographer Walter Isaacson before he died that he’d long wanted to make a TV and had “finally cracked” the difficulty of creating a simple user interface. And, earlier this year, Cook told Charlie Rose that television “is one of those things that if we’re really honest is stuck back in the 70s…this is an area we continue to look at.” (It’s also a product Apple already made, sort of, in the early 1990s.)

What’s changed is that television is more ripe for disruption as the ecosystem of companies around it—cable providers, content creators—try to position themselves for the future. And, arguably, Apple’s clout and ability to disrupt TV is greater than ever. A number of developments in the last couple of weeks have given the idea of an Apple television set renewed luster. Consider that:

Apple has the display. The television-making business is no picnic; just ask Sony, which has lost nearly $8 billion in the last decade on TV’s alone. But the new iMac’s display—which has an extremely high resolution—is the kind of game-changer that consumers might be willing to spend more for.

Apple is calling the display a Retina 5K screen. The high-end 27‑inch iMac has four times as many pixels as the regular 27‑inch iMac display, some 14.7 million pixels. The company created its own timing controller to drive all those pixels and is using a new type of screen technology, an oxide TFT-based panel, to deliver extra brightness.

Cable companies are starting to unravel. Two back-to-back announcements this week suggest the television content business is starting to change. This had been Apple’s biggest obstacle to creating a television device with a radically better way of watching stuff. As my colleague Victor Luckerson put it earlier this week:

By making these channels available for purchase individually, CBS and HBO are embracing the “a la carte” TV model, in which viewers would be able to select the individual channels they want to pay for and ignore the rest. It’s a concept that makes intuitive sense in a world where songs, movies, books and news can be consumed individually, on the go and at little cost. But the model poses a huge threat to cable operators, network owners and even subscribers. If every network did what CBS and HBO are doing, cable and satellite operators would have the core part of their businesses wiped out.

HomeKit is the new “digital hub.” In 2001, Jobs organized the then-struggling company around a new strategy. The computer would become the hub for consumers’ various devices, cameras, music players, video recorders, et cetera. It worked. Today, Apple is working on HomeKit, a framework that lets the company’s devices control smart gadgets around your house. (For more on the smart home, read all of this special TIME issue.) One of a future Apple television’s killer features could be acting as a central nervous system for all the wired lightbulbs, thermostats and so on in your house.

Consumers want it. The current product called Apple TV, a $99 set-top box that can pipe in streaming content from iTunes, Netflix, Hulu and other digital service providers, was denigrated as a “hobby” product by Steve Jobs in 2007. Last month, Cook said the device had gone far beyond that status and has some 20 million users.

And finally, Tim Cook’s Apple is ready. The company has shown it is willing to sign the death warrant for technologies it no longer finds useful. Not to mention place big bets in brand new areas where its success is far from guaranteed. Cook said this was “the strongest lineup of products Apple has ever had and soon you can wear that technology right on your wrist.” I wouldn’t be surprised to find that amended to add the center of the living room.

TIME apps

Ads Are Coming to Snapchat for the First Time

Viewing the ads will be optional

Snapchat users will see ads on the messaging app starting this weekend, the social media company announced Friday.

“Understandably, a lot of folks want to know why we’re introducing advertisements to our service. The answer is probably unsurprising—we need to make money,” the company said in a blog post. “Advertising allows us to support our service while delivering neat content to Snapchatters.”

The company promised the ads wouldn’t display in people’s messages. “That would be totally rude,” Snapchat said. Instead, users will be able to choose whether to view the ads.

TIME Companies

Apple Doesn’t Sell Bose Headphones Anymore

Apple Posts Record Quarterly Earnings
Six-year-old Emma Cordell listens to a new iPod on display at the Apple Store July 14, 2005 in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan—Getty Images

In the competition between headphone makers Beats and Bose, actions may speaker louder than words

Apple has stopped selling Bose headphones and speakers at its Apple Stores, nearly five months after agreeing to buy one of the company’s main competitors, Beats Electronics.

Bose merchandise is now unavailable at the Apple Online Store, and 9to5Mac reported that Apple Retail stores no longer have Bose inventory available.

Bose and Beats, the latter of which was founded by rapper Dr. Dre and acquired this year by Apple for $3 billion, sell similar technology in a comparable price range. The two companies have had an often acrimonious relationship — Beats settled a patent dispute with Bose out of court last week. The NFL is sponsored by Bose, and several players have been fined for wearing Beats at NFL games and other league-related events.

Apple still sells competing headphone brands like Sennheiser and Urbanears, so its exclusion of Bose’s merchandise may be a pointed jab.

TIME Retail

Amazon Will Start Delivering Fresh Groceries in New York Today

Amazon Expands Grocery Delivery Service To Los Angeles Area
An Amazon Fresh truck arrives at a warehouse on June 27, 2013 in Inglewood, California. Kevork Djansezian—Getty Images

Park Slope, Brooklyn residents now have another option for getting fresh groceries delivered to their door

Amazon publishes books, builds smartphones, distributes videos, and produces television shows, not to mention its core business: it sells almost everything. Now, the company is launching its grocery delivery business on the East Coast for the first time on Friday, when it begins delivering food to customers in New York City in an effort to break into the grocery delivery market.

Amazon’s service, called AmazonFresh, promises same-day grocery delivery to customers in New York as long as orders are placed before 10 am, Re/code reports. AmazonFresh will currently deliver only to Park Slope residents, targeting upper middle class families in the Brooklyn neighborhood where there’s sure to be a high concentration of avid Amazon acolytes.

For now, the program is only available to New Yorkers who are members of Amazon’s $99-per-year Prime program, which allows customers to buy pretty much anything from Amazon for free on a two-day delivery. The service has already been operating in Seattle and a few metro areas in California.

How successful will AmazonFresh be? The company is competing against a local online grocer in New York, FreshDirect — which already has a well-established foothold in the city — as well as startups like Instacart. And the grocery business often operates at low profit margins. But if AmazonFresh gets customers to start ordering, it could boost its same-day delivery business to include higher-margin goods.

Read next: 3 Reasons Google’s Same-Day Shipping Looks Like a Game Changer

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser