TIME Video Games

The Game of Thrones Video Game Trailer Looks Almost as Bloody as the Show

The game features the voices of Peter Dinklage and Lena Headey

HBO’s Game of Thrones TV series doesn’t return until the spring, but fans will be able to get their fix with a Playstation 4 video game based on the show.

The six-part episodic game from Telltale (which also turned the similarly popular Walking Dead series into a game) will follow the lesser-known House Forrester, a family from Westeros that has declared an allegiance to the Starks but who must find a way to survive during The War of the Five Kings. The family appears briefly in the George R.R. Martin novels, but not in the show.

Familiar characters like Cersei Lannister, Tyrion Lannister and Margaery Tyrell (voiced by the actors who play those roles on the show, Lena Headey, Peter Dinklage and Natalie Dormer) will make appearances. The game will begin around the end of season three of the series and end before the events of season five.

Telltale has yet to announce a release date for part one of the game, dubbed “Episode One: Iron From Ice.”

TIME Companies

Uber Is Hiring Lawyers to Rework Its Privacy Policy

"Our business depends on the trust of the millions of riders and drivers who use Uber," the company says

Uber is hiring a team of data privacy experts to review its internal policies as the company seeks to recover from an outcry over its alleged mishandling of users’ data.

Attorney Harriet Pearson and other members of law firm Hogan Lovells have joined Uber’s privacy team, according to a Thursday blog post, where they will review and recommend improvements for Uber’s data privacy policy.

Uber has faced a barrage of criticism in recent days over its privacy slip-ups, which include reports of company employees tracking the location of a journalist and a venture capitalist during their rides on the service, as well as a conversation in which an Uber executive proposed the idea of investigating hostile reporters. The ride-sharing company is aiming to restore trust among its users, some of whom have said they will no longer use the app.

“The trip history of our riders is important information and we understand that we must treat it carefully and with respect, protecting it from unauthorized access,” Uber said. “Our business depends on the trust of the millions of riders and drivers who use Uber.”

The company also published a clarification on its privacy policy on Tuesday, emphasizing that it only uses customers’ data for legitimate business purposes.

TIME Technology & Media

Amazon Kindle Users Are Getting the Washington Post for Free

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Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon, introduces new Kindle Fire HD Family during the AMAZON press conference on September 06, 2012 in Santa Monica, California. Joe Klamar—AFP/Getty Images

Jeff Bezos reshapes the Washington Post with new Kindle app

Owners of Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablet are getting a 6-month digital subscription to the Washington Post for free, the retailer announced Thursday. The deal marks the first major collaboration between the newspaper and the retailer since Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos bought the Post last year.

Amazon Fire owners will have access to the Post through the paper’s brand new tablet-only app, which at first will be available only to Fire users. The Washington Post will package news for the Fire tablet in distinct morning and evening editions, along with updates for major breaking stories.

Both the newspaper and the online retailer have plenty to gain from the new arrangement. With its platform on the Kindle, the Post will aim at tapping into a wider audience. And Amazon could bring more customers to the Kindle Fire in order to gain exclusive access to the tablet version of the Post.

“Digital reading opens up so many possibilities for experimentation, and The Washington Post’s new app offers an immersive news-reading experience that we hope our customers find engaging and informative,” said Russ Grandinetti, Senior Vice President of Kindle, in a statement.

Bezos completed his $250 million purchase of the Washington Post in October 2013. He has since helped usher in substantive changes at the paper, dismissing the Post’s longtime publisher Katharine Weymouth and replacing her with former President Ronald Reagan aide Fred Ryan. He’s also hired 100 new journalists and cut retirement benefits for current employees.

Bezos played an outsized role in helping design the Post’s app, the newspaper’s chief technology officer Shailesh Prakash told the New York Times. “We talked to him constantly,” Prakash said about the feedback Bezos gave to developers. “He’s our most active beta tester.”

The Post’s app has been designed with high-resolution photos and graphics, Amazon said, and has an immersive read view as well as a bird’s eye browsing view. Readers can swipe once to move from story to story. The editions will be released at 5 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET.

Amazon has a base of 22.7 million tablet users, according to Kantar World Panel analyst Carolina Milanesi, though its share of tablet sales dropped to 18% from 25% in the year ending in September. The Post saw its paper sales decline 44% in the six years before Bezos purchased it, and both the paper and Amazon hope to energize their businesses through the collaboration.

Analysts said that for Kindle Fire owners, who use the device much more for reading than do owners of other tablets, the new Post app will improve the tablet’s value. But it’s unclear whether the app will drive new Fire sales. “There’s a heavy skew in the amount of time during the day that Kindle Fire owners use it for reading,” said Milanesi. “So that would suit this kind of bundling. But would it make a huge difference to a readership when the free content offering ends? It’s hard to tell.”

For the Post, access to a new audience is instantaneous. “With 42 million monthly readers and growing, this is another step forward in our effort to serve an even larger national and global audience,” said the Post’s Ryan.

TIME Media

HBO Go Is Now on Xbox One

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A member of the Microsoft security team watches over the newly unveiled Xbox One videogame console at the Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington, on May 21, 2013. AFP—AFP/Getty Images

It hasn't hit Sony's PlayStation 4 yet

HBO Go is now available on Microsoft’s Xbox One gaming console.

The online streaming service rolled out on the next-gen console Thursday, according to a Microsoft blog post. HBO Go is already available on the Xbox 360 and Sony’s PlayStation 3, but hasn’t yet arrived on the PS4.

Currently, you’ll need a cable subscription to use HBO Go. However, in 2015, the cable network is planning to launch a standalone online version of its channel that Internet users can subscribe to without paying for cable.

TIME Transportation

Looking for a Ride? Here’s a List of Uber Alternatives

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A Lyft car operates in San Francisco. courtesy of Lyft

A lot of companies want to be your driver

Uber has lost some users this week following stories about executives proposing opposition research on critical journalists’ personal lives and tracking a journalist’s use of the service without her permission. Some customers publicly ended their relationship with the company via social media, including humorist-actor-author John Hodgman. “I really don’t want to take that crummy car I was so glad to hang up on two years ago,” he wrote in a post about his decision to delete the app. “But I just can’t get into a car with those guys anymore.”

If you live in certain parts of the world, you might not even have Uber available as an option to walk away from. And you may have no intention of quitting Uber at all, continuing to love the service that is leading the revolution of local transportation around the world, providing an on-demand alternative to calling up a old-fashioned taxi cab dispatcher.

But for those out there into trying new things, here are some of the other players on the road offering smartphone-enabled rides from A to B:

Lyft: The San-Francisco based ridesharing company is the friendly neighbor to Uber’s cool chauffeur. Drivers use their personal cars, grilles adorned with signature pink mustaches, and invite users to sit in the front seat, often offering a fist bump as a greeting. The company has rolled out three additional services, Lyft Plus (fancy SUV version), Lyft Line (carpooling version) and Lyft for Work (commuting version). Lyft operates in about 60 U.S. cities, compared to Uber’s 220 worldwide. In some cities, like New York, Lyft functions very similarly to Uber.

Sidecar: This ridesharing company, also based in the Bay Area, promises the “lowest prices on the road.” Available in 10 major U.S. cities, Sidecar aims to match riders with “everyday people” driving their personal cars. But unlike other services that rack up a fare as you go, Sidecar asks riders to enter their destination and offers a selection of pre-set prices, along with ETAs, which the rider can choose from. The company also offers a cheaper “Shared Rides” carpooling option like Lyft Line and Uber Pool.

Flywheel: Taxi companies are using apps like Flywheel to re-disrupt the disruptors. Currently in San Francisco, L.A. and Seattle, Flywheel allows users to order a taxi on-demand and have payments made automatically through the app. The ride likely won’t be as fancy as an Uber black car or as cheap as an UberX, but there’s no surge pricing and the company is brokering deals to allow scheduled rides to airports, places where ridesharing companies are typically non grata.

Curb: In August, Taxi Magic launched as the rebranded Curb, broadening their focus beyond providing licensed taxis on-demand to include fancier cars-for-hire (like Uber black cars) in some of the 60 markets where Taxi Magic was already working with fleets. Unlike most of the other app-based services, customers have the option of paying with cash rather than through the app. The refreshed company is also working on launching pre-scheduled rides, to the airport and beyond.

Hailo: Another e-hail company that works with licensed cabs, Hailo is focused on the European market, having launched in London in 2011. (betrayed by their slogan, “the black cab app.”) In October, the company announced it would be closing operations in U.S. cities like New York, Chicago and Boston, shifting their eye to growth in Asia and, perhaps, re-entering the U.S. market in a few years. In September, the company launched an innovative feature that allows users to pay for the bill in a street-hailed taxi through the app.

Summon: The rebranded and overhauled InstaCab, Summon is an on-demand service that has a hybrid approach, offering both taxi e-hails and cheaper peer-to-peer “personal rides” with a no-surge-price promise. Summon is currently available only in the Bay Area, but the company said earlier this year they plan to expand to L.A., Boston and New York. The startup offers pre-scheduled rides through their Summon Ahead program, including fixed-rate rides to surrounding airports, with a journey to San Francisco’s SFO costing a mere $35.

RubyRide: Based in Phoenix, Ariz., and founded in 2013, RubyRide is a fledgling subscription-based startup that bills itself less as a taxi replacement and more as a replacement for owning a car. A basic plan that allows unlimited pre-scheduled pickups and drop-offs within certain “zones” like Downtown Phoenix costs $299 per month. The company offers limited on-demand service but plans to expand their options—including replacing rides to and from the dry cleaners, say, with delivering members’ dry cleaning—as they grow.

Shuddle: Dubbed “Uber for kids,” this San Francisco startup positions itself as an app for lightening Mom’s load. Parents can pre-book rides to take kids (who aren’t old enough to drive themselves) to sports practice or school. With safety the obvious concern, the company institutes layers of checks beyond thoroughly screening employees: drivers are given passwords they have to use before picking up kids; parents are given photos of the drivers and cars and can monitor the trip through their app. Drivers must have their own kids or have worked with kids. The company’s first 100 drivers, which they call “caregivers,” are all female.

TIME apps

How One Word Made a Massive Change to Apple’s App Store

Apps are seen on Apple iPhone 5s January 22, 2014 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/Karen BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Karen Bleier—AFP/Getty Images

Apps aren't labeled "FREE" anymore. They're labeled "GET"

Free apps on Apple’s App Store aren’t listed as “FREE” anymore — they’re listed as “GET.”

The change in the App Store’s download buttons arrives after the European Commission this summer forced Google to eliminate the word “free” on Google Play. That’s because the word “free” was misleading, the Commission said in a statement addressing both Google and Apple, as apps tagged with the “free” label could still have in-app purchases — a big revenue driver for app developers, particularly with mobile games. While Google’s change was seen only in European countries, Apple’s change is worldwide.

Striking the word “free” is also meant to protect children who are misled into making in-app purchases on their parents’ accounts, a situation that’s caused both Apple and Google a few multi-million dollar legal headaches. Apple has previously taken steps to make the App Store more child-friendly by launching a Kids section for children 11 and under.

There is one exception to the App Store’s word swap, though. Apple’s own free apps without in-app purchases, like iMovies, Numbers and Keynote, have retained the “FREE” label.

 

TIME Companies

Netflix Is Now a Whopping One-Third of Peak Internet Traffic

US Online Streaming Giant Netflix : Illustration
In this photo illustration the Netflix logo is seen on September 19, 2014 in Paris, France. Pascal Le Segretain—Getty Images

But YouTube leads on mobile

Netflix now accounts for more than a third of all downstream Internet traffic during peak evening hours in North America, according to research firm Sandvine.

Netflix’s share of traffic during the second half of 2014 rose to 34.89%, up from 34.21% in the first half of the year, Sandvine found in its biannual report. The figure is the highest for Netflix in Sandvine’s publicly available data since 2011. The streaming service has long dominated downstream Internet usage — a point that’s sparked battles between it and Internet Service Providers like Comcast and Verizon, which have argued Netflix should pay up for the bandwidth it uses.

While Netflix’s share inched up slightly, other tech companies also made gains. Facebook, which has been pushing video heavily this year, saw its traffic share increase from 1.99% to 2.98%. Amazon Video, Netflix’s most direct competitor, rose from a share of 1.9% to 2.58%. YouTube’s share also increased, rising from 13.19% to 14.09%. These gains in traffic came at the expense of iTunes and bitTorrent, which both had their shares dip below 3%.

These figures don’t account for Internet connections made via cellular data networks on mobile devices. On that front, YouTube is the leader with a 19.75% share, and Facebook is right behind it with a 19.05% share.

TIME apps

This Is the 1 Thing Facebook Can’t Figure Out

Facebook Creative Labs Apps
Peter Macdiarmid—Getty Images

Can Facebook make a popular standalone app?

Facebook has a good track record of pulling off big things. One-sixth of the world’s population is on the social media platform, which, by the way, is also developing laser-based Internet to connect the rest of the humanity while its CEO finds time to pick up Mandarin Chinese.

But if there’s one project that’s stumped the company, it’s the very thing that made Facebook what it is today: Creating the Next Big Thing, particularly in the form of a new mobile app. Facebook has recently released several apps separate from its primary offering, hoping one will be a hit. Its most recent attempt, Groups, takes the social media platform’s group messaging feature and spins it off into a separate mobile app. Before Groups arrived on Tuesday, there was Rooms, an anonymous chatroom app, Slingshot, a Snapchat-style disappearing messages app, Paper, a Facebook app redesigned for mobile devices and a much-mocked “Facebook for celebrities.”

Rooms and Slingshot are standouts because they’re the company’s first attempts at designing a completely new app outside its core platform. And while Slingshot feels very much like a Snapchat clone, Rooms, with its focus on old-school online chatting’s anonymity, is curiously distant from Facebook’s real-life focus. That makes it special among other apps from Facebook Creative Labs, a Facebook initiative that seeks to create new platforms to “support the diverse ways people want to connect and share.”

While the Facebook Creative Labs’ mission statement doesn’t say anything about building mainstream ways to connect, making popular apps seems an implied goal of a company that wants to be as much of a daily presence as running water. However, most of Facebook’s standalone apps have seen their rankings nosedive since their debuts, according to data from business intelligence firm App Annie. (Groups is still too new to track.)

Facebook does have a proven, if unpopular, way to get people to download its standalone apps — it can force them to do so. Several months ago, Facebook removed the messaging feature from its primary mobile app, telling users to go download the separate Messenger app instead if they wanted to keep privately messaging their Facebook friends. Messenger quickly climbed to the top of the app rankings and mostly remained there, despite poor reviews from users upset over the split.

But Facebook, like other social media companies, has shown it has another option, too: Finding successful apps outside the company’s walls and snatching them up in big-money acquisitions. Facebook’s desire to capture top-notch, widely-embraced apps — and keep them out of rivals’ hands — helps explain why the company paid nearly $1 billion for photo-sharing app Instagram and a jaw-dropping $19 billion for the WhatsApp messaging app, with both deals involving a mixture of cash and Facebook stock.

Whether Facebook can ever come up with a new mobile app that people really love — or if it should even bother trying — is an open question. But that clearly hasn’t stopped Facebook from trying to think up the “next Snapchat,” even if some of its attempts, like the now-extinct Poke and Camera, have totally flopped. As CEO Mark Zuckerberg said himself, the failure of new products has been “humbling.” As a company on top of its own particular mountain, Facebook can afford to learn by trial and error. So until it adds one of its own creations to its portfolio of big-name apps, expect it to keep trying.

TIME apps

Download These 7 Holiday Travel Apps to Get Home in Time for Turkey

Holiday Travelers Crowd Airports Ahead Of The Holidays
Travelers wait in line to check-in for flights at O'Hare International Airport on December 20, 2013 in Chicago, Illinois. Scott Olson—Getty Images

It's a wonderful time of the year - unless you're traveling

Get the car’s oil changed and print those boarding passes out in advance, because it’s going to be a wild Thanksgiving travel season. According to Airlines for America, almost 25 million people are going to board flights in the 12 days surrounding Turkey Day — even more people than last year — and countless others will hit the roadways to get home in time for dinner.

In a rush to beat the traffic, you might forget to pack your toothbrush or travel pillow — but there’s zero chance you’ll leave your smartphone behind. So before you leave home, make sure these seven great travel apps are downloaded and ready to go.

App In The Air

A one-stop information shop for all your air travel needs, this app breaks your trip up into four stages — check-in, boarding, take-off and landing — providing fantastic tools throughout the journey. For instance, a pre-flight checklist reminds users to pack dental floss and plug adapters, while the app can be configured to automatically send text updates of your flight (messaging rates apply) to people who are expecting your arrival. If you have wanderlust, App In The Air can also track your travel statistics — including countries visited, aircraft ridden in, and airlines frequented — improving your status in the app’s community of flyers.

App In The Air is available for free, with in-app purchases, on the App Store and Google Play.

Ambiance

While most airlines don’t allow in-flight cell phone conversations, unfortunately, they can’t ban talking altogether. So if your seat lottery lands you next to a Chatty Cathy, turn on the Ambiance app and tune out. Though it’s been around for nearly as long as Apple’s App Store itself, this is a solid ambient noise app loaded with a wide variety of sounds that have been rated by thousands of people. Birding fans can pick among sweet songstresses including the Fan Tailed Warbler and the Black-Capped Chickadee, while white noise fans can choose from a range of statics (yes, apparently there are more than one). And there’s one for travelers who want to check out but still be in the “now” — it’s called “Airplane Cabin.”

Ambiance is available for $2.99 on the App Store and Google Play.

DogVacay

Thanksgiving may be a family holiday, but all too often, man’s best friend gets the cold shoulder — and there’s not even any turkey on it. DogVacay, an online service that helps dog owners find pet sitters, has a iPhone app that can do everything from book overnight stays to get daily photo-updates of how your four-legged friend is faring. Each dog watcher has different rates and accommodations, so be prepared to pay. But for some pups, being in a home surrounded by people is a much better deal for their overall health and well-being.

DogVacay is available for free on the App Store.

Gate Guru

With the price of airfare always climbing, there’s a good chance you bought a bargain basement, three-leg plane ticket that has you routed through two different hubs. Gate Guru has all the details on various airports, letting you know where to eat, where the restrooms are, and what other shopping and services are available. Ideal for infrequent travelers, the app can have you navigating the terminals like a pro, avoiding the sketchy Chinese food take-out and opting for a tidy, fresh-made sandwich instead.

Gate Guru is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

Glympse

Listen, there’s going to be traffic on Thanksgiving. Sure, you know all the back roads, can zip around that maddening highway interchange like a cab driver, and have all the lights on Broad Street expertly timed, but none of that matters when you arrive to cold mashed potatoes. Don’t hold up dinner — instead, keep the hosts informed to your expected arrival time with Glympse. A GPS-enabled app that shares your location with anyone you choose, Glympse is easier — and safer — than sending text alerts from behind the wheel. Just put in your end destination and recipients phone numbers, and the service determines how long it will take to get there, even calculating for traffic delays, because again: there’s going to be traffic on Thanksgiving.

Glympse is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

Tripit

Planes, trains, and automobiles — and don’t forget lodging! — travel sure takes some coordination these days. Channeling the spirit of the AAA Triptik, this app creates an itinerary of your journey, pulling information from your confirmation emails and neatly arranging them into an easy-to-follow timeline. Turning your smartphone into a modern-day travel folio, it includes all the phone numbers and addresses you need, while cutting down on carry-on bag bulk. Its free-to-use service is great for casual travelers, but high-powered features like flight status text-message alerts and fare refund notifications can make Tripit’s pro-level service pay for itself.

Tripit is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

Waze

We may be decades away from smart roadways that report their own traffic snafus, but this GPS-enabled app lets drivers take data into their own hands. By driving with the app open, users relay realtime traffic information to the service, which then updates all the other users as they drive. And if you encounter a road hazard, from an accident to a detour, you can report it with a hands-free prompt. But most importantly, you can also use Waze as a turn-by-turn navigator to get you to Turkey Day dinner in time for the first round of appetizers, no matter what the roads throw at you. Because, don’t forget, there will be traffic on Thanksgiving.

Waze is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

TIME Security

What To Do When Your Email Gets Hacked

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Person typing on a laptop. Benjamin Howell—Getty Images

First thing's first: Change your password

Last week, I got an email from a friend urging me to check out an amazing page. Between the grammatical errors and a link obviously pointing to a server somewhere in Russia, it was obvious that my friend’s email account had been hacked.

When I checked in with her another way, she already knew about the problem—the hacker’s message had gone out to her entire address book—and she was quite concerned. So I walked her through the steps for getting everything back in order.

Step #1: Change your password.

The very first thing you should do is keep the hacker from getting back into your email account. Change your password to a strong password that is not related to your prior password; if your last password was billyjoe1, don’t pick billyjoe2—and if your name is actually BillyJoe, you shouldn’t have been using your name as your password in the first place.

Try using a meaningful sentence as the basis of your new password. For example, “I go to the gym in the morning” turns into “Ig2tGYMitm” using the first letter of each word in the sentence, mixing uppercase and lowercase letters and replacing the word “to” with “2.”

Step #2: Reclaim your account.

If you’re lucky, the hacker only logged into your account to send a mass email to all of your contacts.

If you’re not so lucky, the hacker changed your password too, locking you out of your account. If that’s the case, you’ll need to reclaim your account, usually a matter of using the “forgot your password” link and answering your security questions or using your backup email address.

Check out the specific recommendations for reclaiming possession of your account for Gmail, Outlook.com and Hotmail, Yahoo! and AOL.

Step #3: Enable two-factor authentication.

Set your email account to require a second form of authentication in addition to your password whenever you log into your email account from a new device. When you log in, you’ll also need to enter a special one-time use code the site will text to your phone or generated via an app.

Check out two-step authentication setup instructions for Gmail, Microsoft’s Outlook.com and Hotmail and Yahoo!. AOL doesn’t support two-factor authentication yet.

Step #4: Check your email settings.

Sometimes hackers might change your settings to forward a copy of every email you receive to themselves, so they can watch for any emails containing login information for other sites. Check your mail forwarding settings to ensure no unexpected email addresses have been added.

Next, check your email signature to see if the hacker added a spammy signature that will continue to peddle their dubious wares even after they’ve been locked out.

Last, check to make sure the hackers haven’t turned on an auto-responder, turning your out-of-office notification into a spam machine.

Step #5: Scan your computer for malware.

Run a full scan with your anti-malware program. You do have an anti-malware program on your computer, right? If not, download the free version of Malwarebytes and run a full scan with it. I recommend running Malwarebytes even if you already have another anti-malware program; if the problem is malware, your original program obviously didn’t stop it, and Malwarebytes has resolved problems for me that even Symantec’s Norton Internet Security wasn’t able to resolve. Scan other computers you log in from, such as your work computer, as well.

If any of your scans detect malware, fix it and then go back and change your email password again. (When you changed it in step #1, the malware was still on your computer.)

Step #6: Find out what else has been compromised.

My mother-in-law once followed the ill-advised practice of storing usernames and passwords for her various accounts in an email folder called “Sign-ups.” Once the hacker was into her email, he easily discovered numerous other logins.

Most of us have emails buried somewhere that contain this type of information. Search for the word “password” in your mailbox to figure out what other accounts might have been compromised. Change these passwords immediately; if they include critical accounts such as bank or credit card accounts, check your statements to make sure there are no suspicious transactions.

It’s also a good idea to change any other accounts that use the same username and password as your compromised email. Spammers are savvy enough to know that most people reuse passwords for multiple accounts, so they may try your login info in other email applications and on PayPal and other common sites.

Step #7: Humbly beg for forgiveness from your friends.

Let the folks in your contacts list know that your email was hacked and that they should not open any suspicious emails or click on any links in any email(s) that recently received from you. Most people will probably have already figured out that you were not really the one recommending they buy Viagra from an online pharmacy in India—but you know, everyone has one or two friends who are a little slower to pick up on these things.

Step #8: Prevent it from happening again.

While large-scale breaches are one way your login information could be stolen—this summer, Russian criminals stole 1.2 billion usernames and passwords—they’re certainly not the only way. Many cases are due to careless creation or protection of login information.

Last year, Google released a study that reveals most people choose passwords based on readily available information, making their accounts hackable with a few educated guesses. Easy passwords make for easy hacking, and spammers use programs that can cycle through thousands of logins every second to identify weak accounts.

Picking a strong password is your best protection from this type of hacking. It also is prudent to use a different password for each site or account, or, at the very least, use a unique password for your email account, your bank account and any other sensitive accounts. If you’re concerned about keeping track of your passwords, find a password management program to do the work for you.

In my friend’s case, her passwords were pretty good and there was no malware on her computer. But she was careless about where she was logging in. On a recent trip overseas, she used the computer in her hotel lobby to check her email. That was a bad idea.

Computers in hotel lobbies, libraries and other public places are perfect locations for hackers to install key-logging programs. The computers are often poorly secured and get used by dozens of people every day who don’t think twice about logging into their email or bank accounts or entering credit card information to make a purchase. The best practice is to assume that any public computer is compromised and proceed accordingly.

This article was written by Suzanne Kantra and originally appeared on Techlicious.

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