TIME Apple

Apple iOS 8 Users Complain About Wi-Fi and Battery Problems

Apple iPhone 6/6 Plus Launch in Japan
A customer looks at the new iPhone 6 Plus at the launch of the new Apple iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus at the Apple store on Sept. 19, 2014 in Tokyo. Chris McGrath—Getty Images

Some iPhone and iPad users gripe about sluggish Wi-Fi and dwindling battery life post-update

Apple users might want to think again if they haven’t already downloaded the iOS 8 upgrade.

People have taken to Twitter and Apple forums to complain that their phones have been experiencing sluggish Wi-Fi and dwindling battery life, post-update.

If this is proof of a genuine issue with the latest iteration of Apple’s operating system, it would be ironic considering that the update boasts features that identify apps that are the biggest battery sucks.

Apple did not reply immediately for comment. But here are some disappointed Apple users airing their gripes on Twitter:

Anyone confused by iOS 8 can also read TIME’s tips and tricks guide to the new system.

TIME privacy

What We Know About the Latest Nude Celebrity Photo Hack

Kim Kadashian Attends The Kardashian Kollection Spring Launch At Westfield Parramatta
Kim Kardashian attends the Kardashian Kollection Spring Launch at Westfield Parramatta on September 13, 2014 in Sydney. Lisa Maree Williams—Getty Images

And what we don't

More explicit photos were posted on the website 4chan Saturday, this time purportedly showing Kim Kardashian, Vanessa Hudgens, Mary-Kate Olsen, Hayden Panettiere, Kaley Cuoco, Hope Solo and an underage Disney star, among other female celebrities.

Previously unseen photos purportedly showing Jennifer Lawrence, who became the face of the last major celebrity photo hack, were posted, too. The photos quickly spread from 4chan to Reddit, following the same pattern as the previous hack, which leaked private photos of Lawrence, Kate Upton, Ariana Grande and almost 100 other female celebrities.

Here’s what we do and don’t know about the latest nude celebrity photo hack:

Are the photos real?

At least two of the hack’s victims have confirmed their leaked photos are, in fact, real.

Actress Gabrielle Union told TMZ on Saturday that her photos were intended for only her husband’s eyes, and slammed the hackers’ insensitivity. “It has come to our attention that our private moments, that were shared and deleted solely between my husband and myself, have been leaked by some vultures,” Union said.

On Sunday, Actress Meagan Good released a statement on Instagram, saying “I’m definitely in shock… Saddened for everyone who is experiencing this… But I ‘choose’ not to give the persons responsible my power.. At the end of the day—We all know these pictures were for my husband.”

In the last celebrity hack, many victims confirmed that the photos were indeed authentic. Cuoco, whose photos were also released in the previous hack, said Thursday on Jimmey Kimmel Live! that she was disturbed to realize the photos were real, but ended up making a “joke about it,” because “you have to make fun of yourself.” Other reactions were less lighthearted: Lawrence’s rep called it a “flagrant violation of privacy.”

What about the other celebrities?

Most have not released statements, or have declined to speak. A rep for Kardashian has declined to comment about the leaked photos to multiple publications. There’s also no word from Panettiere, Olsen, Solo or Hudgens.

But many are wondering about Hudgens, and what approach she’ll take now that she’s not the young Disney starlet of the High School Musical franchise. In 2007, after being shamed for a leaked nude photo, the 18-year-old actress apologized to fans, while Disney followed up and told People that “We hope she’s learned a valuable lesson.”

How did it happen?

No one knows yet, but experts told TIME they believe it’s similar to the last celebrity photo leak, when Apple confirmed that it was a “very targeted attack on user names, passwords and security questions,” and a not system-wide breach of iCloud or Find my iPhone, as was first widely believed. (TIME has reached out to Apple for comment regarding the most recent hack.)

Bob Stasio, Vice President of Threat Intelligence at CyberIQ Services, said the most probable cause is that hackers obtained access to photos by answering security questions to recover or reset passwords—a common tactic and the one apparently used last time. Last year, Michelle Obama’s and other celebrities’ financial records were accessed by hackers who knew enough personal identifying information to impersonate them, according to CNBC.

“The problem with celebrities is that a lot of their information is publicly available,” Stasio said.

Once the passwords have been reset, the hackers can access the celebrities’ e-mail accounts to obtain the passwords to enter iCloud. Hackers will have previously gained access to the stars’ computer servers, thus their e-mails, either physically or remotely through backdoors planted in their systems, Stasio said. These backdoors may have been planted through targeted emails that tempt the users to click on a link or download an attachment.

“That’s really how hacking works,” Stasio said. “It’s all very iterative. You get to one spot, and you have to get to the next spot.”

Can the hackers be found?

They haven’t been found yet, and security experts believe it will be difficult, but not impossible, to track down the hackers. If iCloud accounts were accessed, then Apple can use a record of logins to determine the IP address, Stasio said. But hackers would likely hide their IP address by routing through a different one in another country, which complicates the process. Another method would be to track who had originally posted the pictures on 4chan.

In fact, experts say photo-leaking culprits are often caught, and the fact that both Apple and law enforcement are already involved make the investigation even more likely to turn up results. In 2011, for example, a hacker used the “forgot my password” function to access and leak nude photos and other personal information of Scarlett Johansson, Mila Kunis and Christina Aguilera. An FBI investigation resulted months later in a Florida man being sentenced to 10 years in federal prison, according to CNN.

“The success rate is very high. People doing this are very foolish, thinking they’re going to get away with it,” said Phil Lieberman, President of Lieberman Software Corporation. “For a period of time, they’re the hero. Once they’re caught, they’ll become the zero.”

So why haven’t we found the hackers yet?

In short, it takes time.

“If someone’s life is in danger, law enforcement moves very quickly,” Lieberman said. “But pictures of celebrities don’t rise to the level of kidnapping, murders or serious violent crimes. They’re seen more as economic crimes or invasions of privacy, which are serious, but go on a little slower track.”

Moreover, the fact that Apple’s weak iCloud security was patched only recently means that several intruders may have been in the system for quite a while, experts said, which would add additional layers to the investigation.

Will it happen again?

Experts say yes: This is the second major celebrity photo hack in one month, and it’s part of a rising trend. When Target was hacked last year, Stasio said, a group of hackers sent e-mails to other companies saying they’d detected a similar vulnerability, offering help through a clickable link, which, if opened, would’ve infected the company’s system.

“Not only have the trends of the actual hacks spread, but people use the awareness of the hack itself to try to use it as an infection,” Stasio said.

And there’s likely more photos that have been accessed but not yet shared. Lieberman said that for hackings in the commercial world, the average time the hacker or hackers have spent in the system is 200 days. This suggests the intruders could’ve had months to amass a large collection of explicit photos.

“This may not even be different than the first one,” Lieberman said. “This may in fact be the same group of people with the same set of data, just simply taking another bite of the apple.”

TIME How-To

iOS 8 Guide: 10 Cool Tips and Tricks

Whether you just picked up an iPhone 6 or you're looking to squeeze a little life out of an older iPhone, here's a handful of tricks to try once you're using iOS 8.

Say “Hey Siri” for No-Touch Assistance

If your phone is plugged in, you can get Siri to do your bidding just by saying, “Hey Siri.”

You’ll need to enable the feature first by going to Settings > General > Siri and then toggling the Allow “Hey Siri” switch.

Again, your phone has to be plugged in for this to work, but it could be useful when paired with a car charger or while you’re at your desk.

Find Battery-Sucking Apps

Battery being run down too fast? It’s most likely an app or two that are sapping an inordinate amount of juice. You can check which ones are causing the most trouble by going to Settings > General > Usage > Battery Usage.

You’ll see a list of the apps that have used the most battery over the past 24 hours, with the option to check which ones have been the top drainers over a longer period of time as well.

Adjust Brightness in Photos

When you’re taking a photo and you tap the screen to adjust the camera’s focus, you can now also adjust the brightness. Just tap the screen as you’re taking a photo, then swipe up to make the image brighter or down to make the image darker.

Use the Camera Timer

The camera also has a timer function. Tap the little clock icon in the top menu when you’re taking a photo and it’ll let you choose between a three- or ten-second delay before firing off some snaps.

Get Notified of Email Thread Replies

If you want to keep an eye on an important email thread, you can enable notifications to pop up every time someone adds a new email message to the thread. Click on the little flag icon in the lower left corner of an email message, choose Notify Me… and then Notify Me again. Step through the same process to remove yourself from future notifications once you’ve had enough.

Minimize an Email You’re Writing

If you’re in the middle of typing an email message to someone and you realize you need to reference some information from a previous email elsewhere in your inbox, you can swipe down on the message you’re writing to minimize it to the bottom of the screen. Once you’re ready to write some more, tap the message to expand it again.

Track Your Phone’s Final Location Before the Battery Dies

You’ve misplaced your phone — or worse, it’s been stolen — and the battery is surely dead. You can find out its last known location by heading into Settings > iCloud > Find My iPhone and then toggling Send Last Location on.

Minimize the QuickType Feature

If you find the keyboard’s new QuickType word-guessing feature more annoying than useful, you can minimize it by swiping down from the top of the QuickType bar. If you find that you miss the feature, swipe back up and it’ll re-assume its perch atop your keyboard.

Quickly Send an Audio Recording, Photo or Video in a Text Message

When chatting back and forth in the Messages app, hold down the microphone icon in the lower-right corner to begin recording an audio message. When it’s ready, tap the arrow above it to send it or tap the X to delete it. To send a photo or video instead, hold down the camera icon in the lower-left corner and tap the top icon to snap a photo or the right-hand icon to record a video. Note that these features require that your recipient has an iPhone as well, although you’ll be able to send photos and videos (but not audio) to non-iPhone owners by tapping the camera icon in the lower-left corner and then following a couple additional steps.

Reply to a Text Message Without Leaving Your Current App

When you receive a text message up at the top of your screen, pull down on it to access a quick-reply box. Type your reply, hit Send and go back to what you were doing — all without leaving your current app.

TIME Gadgets

The iPhone 6 Is Apple’s Easiest-to-Repair Phone to Date

Easy access to the screen and battery is a plus.

How easy is it to perform simple repairs and replacements on the brand new Apple iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus? The good folks at iFixit decided to find out. And they did it the only way they know how – by completely disassembling both phones to see how they’re put together.

Overall, the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus were awarded repairability ratings of 7 out of 10, scores that the folks at iFixit call “respectable.” That’s the highest an Apple phone has ever scored – last year’s iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C both scored 6 out of 10. The iPhone 6 also scored better than its biggest competition: Samsung’s Galaxy S5 earned a sub-par repairability score of just 5 out of 10.

What did iFixit like about the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus? Specifically, the site notes that the display comes out of the phone first, which makes repairing it much easier. That’s no small point, given that screen replacements are among the most common of iPhone repairs. iFixit also says that the battery is “straightforward to access,” another important point given that battery replacements are commonplace, too. The fingerprint sensor cable has been moved to a safer location than in the iPhone 5S, better protecting it from tears when exposed.

On the down side, both iPhone 6 phones use proprietary Penatlobe screws that you’ll need a special tool to remove. There’s adhesive to deal with in the repair process too, though iFixit calls removing it “not difficult,” unlike the mess hiding behind the screen of an iPad Air. Apple also gets dinged for not sharing info on repairing the device with independent shops, though given the results of this teardown, most should be able to easily figure out how to make common repairs on their own.

If you want to learn more, you can read the full teardown description of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus at the iFixit website. You can learn more about the phone itself by reading our iPhone 6 launch coverage. And don’t forget to check out our coverage of the new features waiting in the phone’s new iOS 8 operating system.

This article was written by Fox Van Allen and originally appeared on Techlicious.

More from Techlicious:

TIME Companies

Apple Sold More Than 10 Million New iPhones in Just 3 Days

iPhone 6 Apple
People wait to buy the new Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices outside an Apple store in Hong Kong on Sept. 19, 2014 Vincent Yu—AP

Sales tally represents a new record for the company

Apple sold over 10 million new iPhones over the weekend, the company said Monday, a new record for the gadgets maker and results that exceeded the company’s expectations.

Apple unveiled two new smartphones earlier this month — the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus — phones that feature trendy larger screens, faster speeds and fancier cameras. The iPhone 6 starts at $199 on a two-year carrier contract at 16GB, while the iPhone 6 Plus (the phone with an even larger screen) — starts at $299 for 16 GB.

For those keeping track, the sales milestone isn’t a huge leap from a year ago: Apple in September 2013 said it sold 9 million iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C models, at the time a record.

The latest launch kicked off on Friday across a handful of markets, including the U.S., Japan and the U.K., with more markets to be added this Friday. Apple expects to sell its newest iPhones in 115 countries by the end of the year.


Apple’s product launches typically generate strong early sales results and a lot of buzz — videos and news stories often focus on the long lines outside the electronics behemoth’s retail stores. Apple often touts such buzz, and even in the company press statement on Monday, CEO Tim Cook hinted demand was too hot to handle by saying, “We could have sold many more iPhones with greater supply and we are working hard to fill orders as quickly as possible.”

Though Apple continues to churn out strong sales, the company has also been ceding some market share in the worldwide smartphone market as other rivals produce low-cost smartphones, which contrasts with Apple’s strategy to focus on more premium-priced gadgets. Apple’s worldwide smartphone-market share, in terms of units shipped, stood at 11.7% in the second quarter of this year, down from 18.8% in the same quarter in 2011, according to research firm International Data Corp. Samsung’s smartphones have taken some of Apple’s market share, though even that company has faced pressure as more affordable options hit shelves.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

TIME Smartphones

The iPhone 6 Lines Had More Than Just Die-Hard Apple Fans

A short film suggests many of the first people lined up to buy new iPhone 6 units weren't buying for themselves

In the days before the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus were released, the Apple Store in SoHo, New York City, was surrounded not by throngs of excited Apple fans, but by dozens of indifferent-looking, older customers.

According to a short film by Casey Neistat, many of the front-of-liners spoke little English, waiting for the Apple Store to open with a insouciance that seemed incongruous for the launch of one of the most-hyped gadgets of the year. Many of them bought two iPhones each in cash, and then resold the iPhones to another buyer, as seen in Neistat’s films. At least one line-waiter is also seen being arrested for reasons unclear.

What was going on here? The title of this video documenting iPhone 6 days suggests “Chinese mafia” involvement. While there’s no evidence of that exactly, there certainly does appear to be something fishy going on — it’s not impossible many of the first-in-line customers were there just to get some iPhone units to sell in the secondary market here or overseas.

TIME technology

Apple Introduced Its First ‘Laptop’ 25 Years Ago and It Was Totally Awful

Apple Macintosh portable computer, 1989.
An early Macintosh portable computer Science & Society Picture Library / Getty Images

Proof that Apple has come a long way

Correction appended, Sept. 22, 2014, 10:55 a.m.

Twenty-five years ago Saturday, on Sept. 20, 1989, Apple released its first “portable” Macintosh computer — and “portable” belongs in quotation marks, because Sisyphus might as well have been made to lift this thing up a hillside for eternity.

Coming in at a hefty 16 pounds — that’s more than five MacBook Airs, and about four of IBM’s rival product at the time — Apple’s Macintosh Portable had a price tag to match its weight: $6,500 got you the machine, loaded with super-modern features like an “active-matrix screen” and a “cursor-control device called a trackball,” as TIME described it in the Sept. 25, 1989, issue. The computer could also only run on a wall outlet when batteries were installed, unlike desktop computers.

“Apple is taking pains to call the machine a portable rather than a laptop, but computer industry wags have already dubbed it a ‘luggable,'” reads TIME’s article about the Macintosh Portable, revealing that tech writers’ penchant for adorable nicknames (“wearable,” “phablet” and so on) is well-rooted in our trade’s history. “Even so, experts believe the Mac is likely to be a walkaway success.”

Clever pun, but we (or those experts!) were way off base: Customers greeted the Macintosh Portable like a sour apple; PCWorld would eventually deem it the 17th worst tech product ever made.

Read the most recent TIME cover story about Apple here: Never Offline

Correction: The original version of this post incorrectly stated the power needs of the original Macintosh Portable.

TIME Smartphones

Watch How Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus Fare in a Drop Test

This guy tested it so you wouldn't have to

The biggest problem with iPhones — much like bones and marriages — is that they break. The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus are no exception, and while they each do decently in a drop test over concrete, they can also suffer some pretty significant damage.

Scuffs on the case are annoying, and cracked screens are obviously worse. The phones are damaged in different ways depending on how they’re dropped, whether on their sides, fronts or backs.

Watch this here to see how the iPhone 6 fares in a drop test.

TIME Security

Here’s How Home Depot Could Have Combated Hacking

Experts say retailers should invest in detection rather than prevention

As Home Depot continues to assess the damage caused by a security breach that gave hackers access to 56 million credit and debit cards, tech experts say large retailers should turn their attention to addressing breaches quickly instead of trying to prevent all of them.

“Are we spending most of our money on trying to keep the bad guys out or trying to detect as soon as possible when the bad guys get in?” asked cyber crime expert Brian Krebs, framing the issue rhetorically. “The best you can do is stop the bleeding as soon as possible when they do get in.”

At Home Depot, where hackers used malware to collect customer data at cash registers, it reportedly took nine months for the breach to be identified and stopped allowing for the damage to affect millions of customers.

Companies face myriad and evolving ways their data can be breached, making protecting data akin to a game of whac-a-mole. Once one potential threat is identified, hackers have already begun trying to get through another way. Instead of devoting all their resources to chasing the threats, companies should focus on minimizing the time it takes to identity those breaches, said Brian Foster, chief technology officer at cyber security firm Damballa.

“There are two types of companies: those that have been breached and those that don’t know they’ve been breached yet,” he said. “The attackers only have to find one door in whereas Home Depot has to secure all their doors and before they do that they need to know where all the doors are at.”

But even if retailers like Home Depot switch focus to detection from protection, experts say they need to do a better job securing data. And, for retailers, the first place to look is the “point of sale system” where the transaction occurred (the cash register for traditional retailers).

“Some enhancement of that logical access in the point of sale would have been able to harden the system significantly,” said Guy Levy, senior vice president at technology security firm Usher. “This is part of what any big retailer that employs pos systems should be doing now. They should all be scrutinizing their systems very, very hard.”

Despite the recommendations of security experts, many companies remain reluctant to devote the funding to change. But dealing with massive security breaches almost always costs more in the long-term than instituting preventive measures would have cost. Home Depot said the breach at the company will cost at least $62 million.

“It takes awhile to update your technology, to understand the threat,” said Anup Ghosh, founder and CEO of technology security firm Invincea. “But the most expensive dollar spent in security is spent after a breach.”

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