TIME apps

5 Can’t-Miss iPhone Apps You Should Download This Week

Woman using iPhone
Image Source/Getty Images

Check out Workflow, an app that lets you make cool new shortcuts

It seems like hundreds of new iPhone apps pop up every week, but which ones should you bother trying? We explored the App Store and found five apps actually worth downloading.

Robinhood

When you’re new to trading stocks, among the most daunting thoughts is not that you might lose money, but that you might have to pay commission on a trade that ends with you losing a ton of money. Robinhood is your way around this anxiety. Not only does it offer commission-free trading, but it quickly displays historical share prices and allows users to create a stock hit-list by swiping left or right on a given stock. Though you might not earn millions, Robinhood might just help you line your pockets with a little extra cash, if you know what you’re doing.

Robinhood is available free in the App Store.

Workflow

When the Heartbleed fiasco earlier this year temporarily shut down productivity service IFTTT (which allowed users to make simple if-this-then-that macros on their mobile devices), it paved the way for different, though perhaps just as useful apps like Workflow. Workflow allows users to do simple things like creating an icon that makes calls to select people, to getting directions to the nearest coffee shop. The app essentially allows you to create your own apps based on dozens of interchangeable actions.

Workflow is available for $2.99 in the App Store.

Do

I like to think that the meetings of the five families in The Godfather would have been much smoother with an app like Do. It creates a meeting itinerary, with ideas to bring up, alerts, points of interest, and the ability to send automatic summaries to participants. Did Bruno Tattaglia bring up the division of labor union contracts? Do would have put that in the shared notes. Did you suddenly remember not to trust Don Barzini on the import-export deal? Put that in the private notes. It makes the business of meeting with colleagues (or enemy mob bosses looking to have you killed) seamless, easy, and ruthlessly efficient.

Do is available free in the App Store.

Gyf

The last thing anyone wants to do is open up a video in a text message. It might be a hilarious clip from one college friend of another falling down a small flight of stairs, but it’s a dangerous thing to open up a clip at the office and not know where it’s going. Gyf allows you to turn these treasured memories into easy-to-share GIF files. That video of your younger sibling accidentally blowing up a pressure cooker? Mom might not have time to watch a video, so send her the GIF version instead.

Gyf is available free in the App Store.

Zen Shopping

With the holidays right around the corner, the decision between saving a few bucks and doing what is easy might end up taking a turn for the more expensive. Zen Shopping is a brilliant little app that not only compares the best prices for the same item, but also finds coupons, as well as deals geared toward your interests. It also offers partial refunds for certain stores should an item drop below the price you paid, which can mean even greater, more unexpected savings. It really is a full service shopping app that ties everything up nicely with package tracking.

Zen Shopping is available free in the App Store.

TIME apps

Google Drive Just Got a Whole Lot Better

Google Drive
Google Drive Google

You can now send Drive files as Gmail attachments

Google is rolling out a series of updates for its cloud-based storage service Google Drive.

Gmail users will now be able to share Drive documents as attachments that are sent as part of email files. That’s useful in case the person receiving the document doesn’t have permission to view the file in Google Drive or if you delete the file from Drive at a later time.

On Android, Drive users will also be able to search for files using voice commands within the Google search app. A user could say, “OK, Google — search for holiday letter on Drive,” for instance, to automatically pull up the relevant documents without opening Drive. On iOS, users will also be able to start uploading files to drive from non-Google apps.

Both iOS and Android versions of Drive are getting an update to allow users to access and share custom maps developed with Google My Maps.

The Google Drive Android updates will launch during the next week, while the iOS tweaks are already available.

TIME Media

These Are the Theaters That Have Pulled The Interview After Threat

Law enforcement says there's no credible threat

An increasing number of movie theaters and chains are deciding not to show Sony Pictures Entertainment’s The Interview, following a threat believed to come from the same group claiming responsibility for a devastating hack against Sony.

The Regal, AMC, Cinemark and Carmike theater chains won’t show The Interview until federal law enforcement groups finish their investigation of the threats made against the film, the Wall Street Journal reported citing anonymous sources Wednesday. Those chains control nearly half of the movie screens in the U.S., according to the Journal.

NBC News previously reported that Carmike had decided to pull the plug on The Interview. Deadline reported late Tuesday that California’s ArcLight Cinemas, which runs five theaters across the state, also won’t show the film, but a spokesperson later said no official decision had yet been made.

Meanwhile, Landmark Cinemas has cancelled The Interview’s New York City premiere, which was set for Thursday evening. That cancellation comes as the film’s co-stars, Seth Rogen and James Franco, already backed out of several media events around the films.

The threat, which may or may not have come from the same people who hacked Sony Pictures, intimated at the possibility of attacks on theaters that choose to show the movie, a completely fictional comedy about journalists recruited by the CIA to assassinate Kim Jong Un. “We recommend you to keep yourself distant from the places at that time,” read the message, with “the places” apparently referring to theaters showing the film. The message also invoked the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

While Sony is at this point going ahead with the film’s Christmas Day release, sources told NBC News that the company won’t punish theaters that back out. The Department of Homeland Security, meanwhile, has said there’s no “credible intelligence” regarding an attack on movie theaters in the U.S.

The threat also coincided with a new release of Sony employees’ emails, several weeks after hackers breached Sony Pictures’ systems and posted troves of company and employee confidential data online. Early reports linked the hacks to North Korea, which is reportedly furious over The Interview’s plot about killing the North Korean leader. However, North Korea denied conducting the attack, and the little evidence thus far tying the country to the incident is circumstantial.

The total fallout of the Sony attack is still incalculable, but it could amount to the most damaging corporate cyberattack in history.

Read next: 3 Reasons People Think North Korea Hacked Sony

TIME Social Media

Facebook Will Now Help Your Photos Look Way Better

Facebook Auto-Enhance Photos
Thanasak Wanichpan—flickr Editorial/Getty Images

Auto-enhance feature coming to mobile apps

Ever wanted to upload a photo to Facebook from your phone, but the lighting was way off?

Facebook is adding an auto-enhance feature to its mobile apps, giving users the option to use a sliding bar to adjust photos before they upload them, TechCrunch reports. The new feature builds on Facebook’s previous enhancing capabilities, which were limited to unadjustable filters.

Facebook is the latest tech platform to make photo editing more convenient and personalized. Instagram, which launched five new filters this week, made a big change in June when the Facebook-owned photo-sharing community unveiled sliding bars to adjust the intensity of each filter. Apple’s iOS 8, released in September, also took a step towards fast photo editing when it included basic color and light editing on its default Photos app.

[TechCrunch]

TIME Smartphones

Here’s How to Fix Your Cracked iPhone Screen

Broken iPhone
Simone Becchetti—Getty Images

Advice from someone who has broken every model

With apologies to Sir Jony Ive, I have managed to break every version of Apple’s iPhone, in one way or another. From getting water in the original iPhone’s dock to dropping and shattering an iPhone 6 within one day of its release, I’ve done it all. Heck, my iPad even took a face-plant on the sidewalk once, resulting in shards of glass everywhere.

But to date*, I’ve paid $0 to get each device repaired. Now that’s pretty much because Apple’s Genius Bar staffers did me a solid, each and every time I got a case of the dropsies (a string of favors that I imagine will end with this story.)

Still, if you’ve got a broken iPhone screen — depending on the model — there is more than one way to get it fixed.

Original iPhone

Seriously? Just upgrade it. If you’re still lugging around a seven-year-old handset, you probably also have a seven-year-old cellular plan. Carriers will give you an iPhone 5C for free, and your plan will still be cheaper. And no, your original iPhone isn’t worth money — unless it’s sealed in the box, comes with another, opened box original iPhone, and a souvenir gift bag—all in mint condition.

iPhone 3G (and 3GS)

See above. But in case you were wondering, my iPhone 3G screen held up just fine — including when I put it in the washing machine.

iPhone 4 (and 4S)

Sadly, see above, again. But the real problem here isn’t that you can’t get these screens replaced, because you actually can. It’s just that these older phones are officially obsolete, unable to load the newest versions of iOS. And, in addition, it’s currently less expensive to buy an iPhone 5S ($99) than it is to fix a broken screen on these older models ($149 each, except for iPhone 4S, which costs $199). These repair prices were quoted by Apple, and tend to be higher than third party repair services or do-it-yourself options. But still, it’s less expensive to simply upgrade to a new handset.

Still, if you like the challenge of doing it yourself, this guide by iFixit can help you field strip your iPhone like it was a wide-mouthed bass. But before you rip into it, grab a display replacement kit, which has all the tools and hardware you need and typically costs less than $20.

Alternatively, if, like me, you broke iPhone 4’s rear glass cover, you can easily swap it out, and get some pretty cool colored or brushed aluminum replacements in the process.

iPhone 5 (and 5S)

Apple’s out-of-warranty cost for replacing these handsets’ screens is $129, which again, begs the “why not upgrade” question. But in this instance, the answer to that might be because your iPhone 5 is still too new to toss — and I’d argue that even if you can upgrade, this phone is still plenty powerful and worth holding onto (at least as a backup).

Replacing the iPhone 5 on your own is also a little more involved than its predecessor, invoking the need for special suction tools, as iFixit demonstrates. For $59, the company provides everything you need to fix your broken iPhone 5 screen, but if you have a busted iPhone 5C or a smashed up iPhone 5S, make sure you get the proper kit — they aren’t all the same. (In fact, the replacements for the colored and Touch ID sensor phones cost $89.)

As the costs of replacement parts soar, it might be worth considering having someone else fix up your iPhone. A local third-party repair shops that I contacted recently quoted just over $100 to replace my shattered iPhone 5 screen. Yup — I’ve broken one of those, too. Well, my wife did, a month after I broke my brand new iPhone 6.

iPhone 6 (and 6 Plus)

Before I go into display replacement options for Apple’s newest iPhones, two pieces of advice. First, buy a case. The brushed aluminum backing on the new iPhones is smooth and particularly slick. With its wider form factor, the phone is more difficult to grip. I recommend Apple’s leather case, it’s the best protector I’ve ever had — and no, I didn’t have one when I dropped my iPhone 6 in the garage, 23 hours after I bought it.

Secondly, buy the AppleCare Plus warranty. In my 15 years as an Apple user, I have never bought one warranty, but if I could take a mulligan on this device, I would. Many people opt out of AppleCare Plus because the cost of replacing the newest iPhone’s display is an all-time-low $109 ($129 for the iPhone 6 Plus). But the $99, two-year plan is a good investment because it allows for two accidental incidents. (Meanwhile, AppleCare’s default plan lasts just six months and only covers manufacturer’s faults.) You’ll want these protections because even the non-plus-sized iPhone 6 is wider than you think, and you will drop it. I repeat, you will drop the iPhone 6.

Also, it’s entirely possible that iPhone 6’s screen replacement services are currently unavailable, because demand for the new phones are so high that replacement displays are hard to come by. This would mean that Apple could only replace your iPhone 6, a repair option that costs $299 for an iPhone 6, or $329 for iPhone 6 Plus. If you had AppleCare Plus, that would cost $0.

Given how new the iPhone 6 is, its replacement parts are still very expensive, and third-party repair shops are having a difficult time matching the Apple Genius Bar pricing. A call to a local shop just generated a $250 quote for an iPhone 6 screen replacement, and the iPhone 6 Plus’s screen costs $370 for them to fix.

And likewise, it’s still early for do-it-yourselfers to make their own repairs. This walk-through explains how to swap out a new screen for a broken one. They also sell replacement display parts, but starting at $166, you won’t save any money fixing your iPhone 6 on your own. Just do as I’ve done every time: bring it back to Apple, be very nice to the lovely people there, flash a smile, tell a funny story about how you destroyed the super-computer in your pocket, and know that it will all work out in the end.

*With my recently broken iPhone 5, this is likely to change soon.

TIME technology

Enter Photography’s Fifth Dimension

Steven Sebring built a 15-foot geodesic dome rigged with a hundred digital cameras to create seamless 360-degree images

In the 1990s, photographer and multimedia artist Steven Sebring dreamed of a day where space and time would be interwoven in a single continuum. The Internet, until then the prerogative of a select few large institutions, was slowly making its way into family-homes. Photographers still relied on film, but the age of the megapixel was not far. Revolution was around the corner.

But for Sebring, revolution couldn’t come fast enough. “To this day, and despite the opportunities recent innovations afford us, representations of our world remain for the most part two-dimensional. It’s so flat, and deceitful,” says the American artist who has worked tirelessly to turn his mad hatter vision into reality.

He built a 15-foot geodesic dome rigged with a hundred digital cameras arranged along a circular rail in his New York City studio. A NASA-like control room allows him to fire them remotely and then automatically stitch the captures into a 360 degrees seamless composite; all in a matter of seconds. He calls it “The Revolution Rig”.

“It’s been quite the journey,” he says. “Software developers, engineers and I have been developing the system for the past two and a half-year and experimenting with it. We haven’t even come close to exhausting our options. Every time we play with the Rig, it’s like opening Pandora’s box.”

Early experiments had Sebring elaborate on Eadweard Muybridge’s pioneering work. In the late 19th century, the British photographer dissected human and animal motions by using several cameras. Thanks to his images, debate over whether all four hooves of a galloping horse were at once off the ground, was settled: they are.

These movement studies in mind, Sebring sought to produce a seminal yet entertaining opus dedicated to the art of posing. “I wanted to document the beauty of the human form because it is a source of inspiration for so many artists working in different fields, me included,” he explains.

Canadian supermodel Coco Rocha, known for her versatility, turned out to be the perfect muse. Dressed in a skin-colored leotard, she stepped into the dome and began acting the part of Botticelli’s Venus, a prima ballerina or Grace Jones under the unforgiving gaze of a hundred objectives. Within three days, the 26 year-old struck the thousand different poses that make up “The Study of Pose”. “I guess the experience can be quite nerve-racking,” says Rocha. “But, as a model you don’t have the luxury of being overly self-conscious. That said, when I look at some of my poses from an unusual angle, I notice that they are not always the most flattering. It was about capturing form, not necessarily elegance.”

Again much like Muybridge, Sebring faced more technological challenges when the time came to share his observations. To recreate the movement he recorded, Muybridge developed the zoopraxiscope. Through this rotating device, transcriptions onto a glass disk of his images were projected quickly one after another in such a way that they became animated. That signaled the advent of cinematography.

's Wrestlers
“We’re recording time and then blurring it by condensing it into one frame,” says of his surrealist portraits. Steven Sebring

Sebring had to wait for interactive displays to become more commonplace. “In print what you have is what a single camera captures. Thanks to touch-screen technology, which is emerging as the way we digest content in the twenty-first century, you can render the full experience,” he says. “If the book version of The Study of Pose shows a thousand poses; the app contains a hundred thousand.”

Rocha is not the only one to have tried Sebring’s futuristic cocoon. Dancers, body builders, wrestlers, and even his longtime friend Patti Smith have all had their movements scrutinized. In some, the photographer drags the shutters of the multiple cameras. In others he triggers them in sequence, split-second apart. “That’s where the fourth dimension comes in. We’re recording time and then blurring it by condensing it into one frame”, he remarks.

Lately, Sebring has been trying to break the next frontier, which he calls the “fifth dimension”: record and incorporate the sounds of what goes on inside the dome. “The possibilities for experimentation and application are endless. People have yet to understand just how far we can take this technology. But once they do and once they embrace it – which is inevitable – there’s no going back.”

Steven Sebring‘s Study of Pose, published by Harper Design, is available now, while an exhibition runs at Milk Gallery in New York until Dec. 21. An iPad app will be available later this year.

Laurence Butet-Roch is a freelance writer, photo editor and photographer based in Toronto, Canada. She is a member of the Boreal Collective.

TIME Mobile

Here’s Why You’ll Pay Less for Your Wireless Plan Next Year

T-Mobile
T-Mobile President and CEO John Legere speaks at a news conference at the 2013 International CES at The Venetian on January 8, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada. David Becker—Getty Images

Carriers like Verizon, ATT&T and T-Mobile are fighting a price war that could last months. The longer it endures, the more choice consumers will have

This hasn’t exactly been a banner year for wireless carriers’ stocks. While the S&P 500 Index has risen 8% this year, AT&T and Verizon, which together control about 83% of the wireless market, are down 8%.

The two companies have fared especially poorly in the last month: AT&T is down 10% and Verizon is down 12%, while the S&P is down only 2%. The reason is one that may delight consumers and concern investors: A price war, in which rivals cut prices to steal market share from one another, has broken out among carriers, and it’s only likely to get more intense next year. The longer a price war endures, the more choice consumers will have, though it means financial pain for carriers.

Verizon issued a press release last week with a headline touting “strong wireless customer growth” this quarter, but contained less sunny news further down: the “impacts of its promotional offers . . . will put short-term pressure” on Verizon’s profit margins. When companies issue statements about earnings before they’re officially reported, there’s usually worrisome news tucked inside. The following day, Verizon CFO Francis Shammo offered more spin.

“What we’re seeing is a pretty exciting period here at Verizon Wireless,” he said at an investors’ conference, “where we saw an increase in the activations but we’re also seeing some increase in the churn as well.”

Churn, which measures customer attrition, is a scourge to companies that rely on subscribers because it can signify customer dissatisfaction or the impact of rivals’ lower prices. A recent survey by Consumer Reports suggests customer satisfaction is comparable among AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile (not so much Sprint, which is having issues in upgrading its network). In previous surveys, Verizon had a clear lead and T-Mobile had lagged. That’s a sign Verizon owes its churn problem to competitors’ lower prices.

Still, Verizon’s Shammo argued that talk of a price war was overstated and that “the revenue of the industry . . . has come down slightly but not as much as everybody is making it out to be.” The market disagreed. Verizon’s stock fell 4% as Shammo made his comments. Two securities firms downgraded Verizon’s ratings, while two others lowered their price targets for the stock.

It didn’t help that at another investment conference that same day, AT&T CFO John Stephens was saying something similar in starker terms.

“The current impact — the current environment is impacting churn,” said Stephens. “In fact, we expect postpaid churn to be higher than it was in the year ago fourth quarter. This will impact fourth-quarter adjusted wireless margins.”

That’s especially good news for T-Mobile, which, under the banner of the “uncarrier,” has run promotions that remove two-year lock-ins and data caps and offer lower-price plans to steal customers away from its bigger rivals. AT&T and Verizon have responded with their own lower-priced plans, but the advantage seems to be going T-Mobile’s way.

Last week, T-Mobile CEO John Legere boasted to the Wall Street Journal that it’s taking in more customers than it’s losing, meaning it isn’t being hit by the same churn striking Verizon or AT&T. T-Mobile upped the ante yet again Tuesday with its eighth “uncarrier” promotion, which lets users roll over unused LTE data from one month into the next for free. Mobile carriers once offered similar roll-over offers for phone calls when it became clear that data networks were displacing voice calls, but until now data plans had no such perk.

None of this means T-Mobile and Sprint’s investors are necessarily any happier than those who own AT&T and Verizon stock. In fact, they’re probably less happy. T-Mobile’s stock is performing as badly as Verizon and AT&T’s this month, and year to date it’s down 26%. T-Mobile is pursuing subscriber growth and revenue with its low prices, but that strategy pushes down profits — the “uncarrier” has posted a loss for three of the last four quarters. Sprint’s stock is doing even worse: It’s down 62% so far this year.

From the looks of things, the carriers’ fierce competition may continue into 2015. This month, Sprint began offering to halve the monthly bills of AT&T and Verizon subscribers who switch to similar plans on Sprint. Not to be outdone, T-Mobile offered an unlimited data plan with two lines for $100 a month.

Verizon’s Shammo predicted the price war will pass in a matter of months. “I think that things will settle down in 2015,” he said at the UBS conference. “Some of this is just temporary promotion-type stuff to stimulate some growth . . . You can’t do that long term. You can do that for a quarter or two, but then you have to get realistic.”

There’s reason to think that may not happen. When price wars break out, investors often watch who is gaining market share and revenue. Right now, that’s T-Mobile, despite its struggling performance on Wall Street. Its CEO has taken on activist shareholders in the past and has the grit to do so again. As for Sprint, investors may come to see that fighting on price may be the best option as long as customer satisfaction remains low.

At the same time, niche carriers are beginning to win over some customers as well. In Consumer Reports’ recent ranking of carriers, the two clear winners were tiny ones: Consumer Cellular and Ting, both of which ranked high on value and network quality. Last quarter, according to Cowen & Co., smaller carriers like them made up 5.2% of the postpaid mobile market, up from 4.2% only a quarter before.

For subscribers weary of having only two comparably priced mobile carriers to choose from, price competition from smaller players is welcome, even if network quality has long been an issue. When industries go from being uncompetitive to more competitive, there is often a period of declining margins across the board as consumers are given a broader range of choices.

The current price wars are coming at a time when carriers need to bid on costly spectrum auctions and spend money upgrading their networks. That suggests a tough time ahead for wireless carriers and their investors in the short term. But if price competition becomes a long-term phenomenon, it could eventually bring big returns for whichever companies emerge as the victors.

TIME apps

Microsoft’s ‘Sway’ Changes Everything You Know About PowerPoint

Microsoft

And that's either a great thing or a terrible thing

Microsoft gave PowerPoint a mobile-friendly twist Tuesday with a wider public release of Sway, a new presentation app designed for the confines of mobile phones and tablets. The preview version of the app is now available without signing up for a waiting list, though Microsoft hasn’t announced a release date for the finished product yet.

Microsoft is hoping Sway will appeal to a new set of users: Movers and shakers who want to whip together presentations across a slew of devices, from their 20-inch desktop to their 4-inch smartphone. Squeezed for time and screen space, these users could easily dispense with PowerPoint’s more esoteric features — Its seemingly endless selection of fonts, for instance, includes three species of Wingdings.

The question for Microsoft’s design team was where to make the cuts — and it’s clear from the first glance at Sway that they haven’t just debuted a new PowerPoint with a few nips and tucks. They’ve done reconstructive surgery.

Gone are the dropdown menus nestled within more dropdown menus. Gone are the finicky buttons regulating every square inch of your slides. Gone, even, are the slides. In their place is an interface so spare that experienced PowerPoint users may feel a momentary loss of control.

But that’s actually the point, says David Alexander, senior product manager at Sway.

“Candidly, what we did with Sway was we took the design instincts of real designers and encoded them into algorithms,” says Alexander. The result is a digital design assistant that does the heavy lifting for you. Instead of scrolling through font menus, an icon labeled “Remix!” instantly switches out the font and matches it against a new background. Instead of nudging around headlines, bullet points and images, each item can be created individually, and the program stitches them together into a neat little slide. And that word “slide” is no longer an apt description of the finished product. If anything, Sway’s results resemble a very long webpage, fit for scrolling rather than flipping.

“Docs and Powerpoint were originally designed with an eye toward emulating an analog form of content: A piece of paper for a document. A flip chart for a presentation,” Alexander says. “We wanted to create a new, digital-oriented output that doesn’t try to emulate a paper-based environment.”

Sway also makes embedding media from Twitter, Facebook, or photos from personal devices a seamless experience. A search field built into the app can fetch content from any of these dispersed sources and load it directly into the presentation. No more copying, saving and pasting.

The question remains whether people used to PowerPoint’s total customization features will sacrifice a measure of control to a slightly pushier program. Sway’s Alexander concedes it isn’t for everyone, and focus groups are sometimes split over the new features. “Two women sitting next to each other had the exact opposite reaction to Sway,” Alexander said. One loved the ease of use. The other hated the stripped down controls and vowed never to use it.

In either case, Microsoft hopes to appeal to both users. The company has excelled at creating power tools for the office, but an explosion of mobile devices and apps from rival tech giants has chipped away at its market share beyond the workplace. It’s one reason Microsoft’s new CEO, Satya Nadella, has made “mobile-first, cloud-first” a company mantra. One result is a standalone app that marks a departure not only from PowerPoint, but from Microsoft’s old ball and chain, the office PC.

TIME Security

Delta Says Boarding Pass Hack Had No Impact on Flight Safety

US-TRANSPORTATION-AVIATION-DELTA
A Delta Airlines jet takes off from Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport February 21, 2013 in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Karen Bleier—AFP/Getty Images

The flaw was discovered Monday

Delta Airlines said Tuesday that a security vulnerability on its mobile boarding passes has been fixed without causing any “impact to flight safety.”

The boarding pass vulnerability was first found Monday by a BuzzFeed intern who also runs a site about technologists. In a post on Medium, Dani Grant detailed how she was able to access other passengers’ boarding passes simply by changing a single digit in her pass’ URL. She was also able to log in to Delta’s site as those other passengers, from which point she could’ve changed their seating assignments or accessed other details about them.

Grant was also able to access boarding passes belonging to non-Delta passengers, most likely because airlines share some technology that powers mobile boarding passes.

“After a possible issue with our mobile boarding passes was discovered late Monday, our IT teams quickly put a solution in place this morning to prevent it from occurring,” Delta spokesperson Paul Skrbec said Tuesday afternoon. Delta is still investigating the problem, but Skrbec’s statement added that Delta is “not aware of any compromised customer accounts.”

It’s unlikely that the flaw could have posed a threat to aviation safety. While Grant suggested on Twitter that it would have been possible to take advantage of the vulnerability for nefarious purposes, airport safety procedures should have prevented any security lapses.

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