TIME apps

The Over-30s Must Pay Double for Tinder’s New Premium Service

Now you can rewind that left swipe, but it will cost you

Tinder launched its much anticipated premium service on Monday but the hugely popular dating app will cost twice as much for users over 30.

Tinder Plus offers users the chance to undo accidental left swipes, reports ABC. (Tinder allows users to search for others who are located close to them on their smartphones, swiping right if you’re interested in a profile and left to reject that person.)

The feature also allows you to connect with people in different cities using the “Passport” function, and the app will be ad-free.

Users in the U.S. can purchase the new upgrade for $9.99 a month, unless you’re over 30, in which case you’ll have to pay $19.99 for the privilege.

And if you live in the U.K., Tinder Plus will cost you £14.99 ($23) if you’re 28 or over, compared with just £3.99 ($6) for users ages 18 to 27.

But Tinder says its prices are based on “extensive” testing.

“Younger users are just as excited about Tinder Plus, but are more budget constrained, and need a lower price to pull the trigger,” said Rosette Pambakian, vice president of corporate communications at Tinder.

[ABC]

TIME Social Networking

Twitter Investigating ISIS-Related Threats Against Employees

Twitter
Leon Neal—AFP/Getty Images File photo dated September 11, 2013 shows the logo of the social networking website 'Twitter' displayed on a computer screen in London.

After Twitter blocked several ISIS-related accounts

Twitter is investigating threats made against its employees by people claiming ties to the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS).

A message appeared online Sunday calling on ISIS supporters to kill Twitter employees, apparently in response to the company’s efforts to block ISIS-related accounts.

“You started this failed war,” reads one post in Arabic. “We told you from the beginning it’s not your war, but you didn’t get it and kept closing our accounts on Twitter, but we will soon come back.”

One message singled out Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey in particular, showing an image of crosshairs overlaid on Dorsey’s face. Dorsey is now CEO of mobile payments company Square.

“Our security team is investigating the veracity of these threats with relevant law enforcement officials,” said Twitter spokesman Jim Prosser.

ISIS has often used Twitter and other social media to broadcast its message, publish video of violent acts and recruit new followers. The group has shown a penchant for “gaming” Twitter by using automated accounts to make its online supporter base seem larger than it likely actually is.

Meanwhile, Twitter regularly deletes posts and suspends accounts showing executions or violent actions. The company’s terms of service ban posting “direct, specific threats of violence against others.”

TIME Companies

Mark Zuckerberg Doesn’t Want All the Credit for Bringing the Internet to More People

Mark Zuckerberg attendes Mobile World Congress 2015
David Ramos—Getty Images Founder and CEO of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg speaks during his keynote conference during the first day of the Mobile World Congress 2015 at the Fira Gran Via complex on March 2, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain.

"It's really important not to lose sight of the fact that people driving this are the operators"

Mark Zuckerberg kept a low profile Monday during his Mobile World Congress keynote about Internet.org, Facebook’s project to spread Internet connectivity to underserved areas with wireless carriers’ help.

The Facebook founder downplayed his company’s role in Internet.org, instead urging the audience to recognize the work and investments of mobile carriers. Zuckerberg delivered his keynote alongside executives from three global telecommunications companies.

“While it’s sexy to talk about [Internet.org’s Internet-beaming] satellites, the real work happens here, by the companies. It’s really important not to lose sight of the fact that people driving this are the operators,” Zuckerberg said. “Too often Internet.org is conflated with Facebook.”

People in the parts of the developing world where Internet.org’s app is available get access to Facebook, Google search and some other services for free. But the end goal is to convince these users to eventually purchase data plans from wireless carriers — and so far, Internet.org has been successfully driving new smartphone use.

“It Colombia, it’s very encouraging to see about 50% more people in three weeks in our network as new data users,” said Mario Zanotti, senior EVP of Latin America at telecom company Millicom. “In Tanzania, we have seen a ten-fold increase in the number of smartphone sales since we launched the [Internet.org] campaign. So it’s pretty impressive numbers.”

Despite Zuckerberg’s efforts to highlight the work of Internet.org’s carrier partners, it’s hard to see the project being successful without Facebook’s involvement. Zuckerberg’s company has largely spearheaded the organization’s efforts, while its offerings in the Internet.org app, like Facebook Messenger, are a big draw to attract users.

However, some mobile carries could be worried that Facebook might cannibalize their voice and texting plans with its own services. Last year, Facebook acquired chat app WhatsApp, which became popular as means of avoiding wireless carriers’ texting fees.

“This is a point of tension between operators and Facebook in particular. It’s a consideration for any company to be careful to deliver the ‘key’ to the competitor,” said Jon Fredrik Baksaas, CEO of telecom company Telenor. “You really want to watch that ‘key’, and you want to control how that ‘key’ develops. That’s where the disruption comes.”

TIME Smartphones

See Why Samsung Needs the Galaxy S6 To Be a Massive Hit

Samsung Galaxy S6 Apple Shipments
Lluis Gene—AFP/Getty Images The Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge (L) and Samsung Galaxy S6 are presented during the 2015 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona on March 1, 2015.

The Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge will go toe-to-toe with Apple's iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus

After months of teases, Samsung unveiled its new flagship smartphone, the Galaxy S6, and its curved-screen cousin, the Galaxy S6 Edge, at Mobile World Congress on Sunday.

The new phones couldn’t arrive quickly enough for Samsung. Just a few weeks ago, a Strategy Analytics report estimated that Apple tied Samsung in global smartphone shipments last quarter, thanks to massive iPhone 6 sales.

If accurate — Samsung doesn’t report smartphone sales on its own — that would mark the first time Apple has matched Samsung’s quarterly global shipments since the end of 2011, when Apple’s figures slightly surpassed those of Samsung. (Note that Apple’s global shipments tend to spike each Q4 due to its annual fall iPhone releases and the holiday season, while Samsung releases smartphones year-round.)

 

Samsung, whose last flagship Galaxy S5 posted disappointing sales, isn’t shy about comparing the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge to the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, whose sales bested Apple’s previous records. During Samsung’s unveiling, it subtly mocked the iPhone 6 Plus’ Bendgate controversy while comparing the S6 phones favorably to their iPhone rivals.

The good news for Samsung is that it’s still number one when it comes to annual global smartphone shipments. But that’s hardly comforting when Samsung’s sales fell slightly from 2013 to 2014, while Apple’s sales show no signs of slowing down—putting even more pressure on the Galaxy S6.

 

Still, early reviews of the Galaxy S6, which goes on sale April 10, suggest the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge might be exactly what Samsung needs to remain competitive with Apple.

 

TIME Gadgets

Microsoft Reinvented the Keyboard — Yes, the Keyboard

It folds down the middle and uses Bluetooth

For heavy-duty writing on the go, regular keyboards are too big, while touchscreen keyboards are too small. But Microsoft is betting that is new, foldable keyboard will be just right.

Microsoft unveiled the Universal Foldable Keyboard on Monday, a thin, lightweight keypad that folds down the middle. Unfold the keyboard and it automatically powers on and connects wirelessly to Bluetooth-enabled phones or tablets. The battery lasts upwards of three months on a single charge, according to Microsoft.

The keyboard will go on sale at the Microsoft Store and various retailers this July for $99.95.

Read next: See Why Samsung Needs the Galaxy S6 To Be a Massive Hit

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Gadgets

This Magic Button Delivers Pizza to You and That’s It

Click N' Pizza
La Comanda Click N' Pizza

Dial "P" for pizza

Ever wish you could order a pizza in a click of a button? Your ship has finally come in, thanks to an enterprising Italian startup gambling on an explosion of buttons for popular takeaway items.

The Click’N’Pizza button, which is made by the Milan-based La Comanda, clasps to any refrigerator door and requires a little programming up front. Users can select up to four favorite topping orders on a circular screen. A tap of the button will wirelessly transmit the number one ranked order to a local pizza joint. Users with a bit more patience can use a scroll wheel to select lower ranked orders.

In either case, the button excitedly confirms orders with the message, “Pizza is coming!”

La Comanda founder Carlo Brianza says the company already has a distribution partnership to sell the button at Pizza Hut locations in North America, Yahoo News reports.

“We are starting out in the Pizza delivery market,”says Carlo Brianza, CEO of La Comanda, “but the Click’N’ . . . family can provide a new e-commerce experience for customers in a variety of services, such as coffee pods (Click’N’Coffee), meal options (Click’N’Food), and beverages (Click’N’Drink),”

But they better move fast, because even in this niche market, they already have a competitor: the Pie Pal, a single click button that communicates with Domino’s ordering system.

TIME Gadgets

Here’s the New Camera That Could Kill GoPro

Xiaomi launched a cheap action cam in China

Xiaomi unveiled its first action camera on Monday, and it beats the entry-level GoPro Hero on both price and specs.

The Yi Camera, which will be available in only China, is on sale for 399RMB ($64), about half the price of the $130 GoPro Hero, The Verge reports. The Yi Camera has a 16-megapixel camera that can record 60 frames per second. That trumps the GoPro Hero’s five-megapixel camera, which can record only 30 frames per second.

While the word’s still out on how the Yi Camera feels during real-life use, its launch is Xiaomi’s latest step beyond the smartphone market, which previously included smart TVs and fitness bands. Xiaomi doesn’t sell its products in the U.S. yet, but it’s planning to open an online shop focused on non-mobile phone products for the American market.

[The Verge]

TIME technology

Ikea Furniture Will Soon Charge Your Phone

Ikea
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images A sign is posted on the exterior of an IKEA store on June 26, 2014 in Emeryville, Calif.

No need to waste time looking for your phone charger: some new Ikea furniture will be able to charge your phone wirelessly beginning in April, the company announced Sunday.

The wireless charging stations, designed by the Wireless Power Consortium, will be integrated into pieces like desks, tables and lamps using a technology standard called Qi Wireless. The company will also sell an add-on kit that allows people to add wireless charging to existing furniture. Buying a wireless-charging-integrated product will cost €30 ($33) extra, according to the Wall Street Journal.

“Through research and home visits, we know that people hate cable mess,” said Jeanette Skjelmose, a corporate manager at Ikea. “They worry about not finding the charger and running out of power. Our new innovative solutions, which integrate wireless charging into home furnishings, will make life at home simpler.”

But will it work with your phone? Yes, if you have a Samsung Galaxy, Google Nexus 6 or one a few other phones. But Apple fans beware: it doesn’t work with the iPhone.

Read next: The Galaxy S6 Is Samsung’s Best-Looking Smartphone Yet

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME apps

Play the Best New iPhone Puzzle Games

Looking for a new iPhone game a little more mentally stimulating than Angry Birds? Try one of these five puzzle games, sure to confound and delight you.

  • Ones

    Ones
    Ones

    Ones is essentially a maddening version of 2048. Combine three or more identical blocks in order to create the next block. The goal is the mash enough blocks together and align them well enough so that you can reach the highest numbered block possible. You will spend hours trying to top your high score, and then, once you do, will spend hours more trying to do the same again.

    Ones is $0.99 in the App Store

     

  • Deeply Absurd Chain

    Deeply Absurd Chain
    Deeply Absurd Chain

    I am immediately fond of any game that embraces its own absurdity on the most superficial level. At first, this plays like most match games—the basic principle of which is to line up as many similar items in a row. But in Deeply Absurd Chain, matching items only reveals the next link in the chain, allowing for far more complicated moves. It’s a game that sends you down a rabbit hole of cartoonish puzzling with an archeological theme.

    Deeply Absurd Chain is free in the App Store

  • Atomas

    Atomas
    Atomas Atomas

    One of the best-designed games this month, Atomas is a puzzle game based in chemistry. Start with very basic elements and then try to get them to bond to one another to form precious metals like gold from your collection of bonded atoms. But don’t let your screen get too crowded with elements. You’ll learn about the periodic table, but you won’t become the next Walter White.

    Atomas is free in the App Store

     

  • Under the Sun

    Under the Sun
    Under the Sun

    In Under the Sun, the goal is to lead your character through a series of puzzle-based desert island maps. In this 3D puzzle game, try to navigate natural obstacles such as trees and rocks in order to get to reach your fire before it gets dark. But every move you make alters the map just a bit. Thankfully, you can tinker with time and go backwards if you make a mistake.

    Under the Sun is free in the App Store

     

  • TWIST3D

    TWIST3D
    TWIST3D

    Somewhere between a game of Tetris and a frustrating few hours spent with a Rubik’s Cube, TWIST3D is a puzzle game in which you must twist a 3D cube-like map in order to reveal patterns and match gems that only reveal themselves once a pattern is detected. You can use boosters to help you sort out the cube, but this game is only for those who are exceptionally skilled puzzle-solvers — those quick to anger should steer clear.

    TWIST3D is free in the App Store

TIME Virtual Reality

Here’s How Valve Cracked Virtual Reality’s Biggest Problem

This is shaping up to be the most important year in the tumultuous, not-quite-there-yet history of virtual reality.

A number of companies, from Facebook and Samsung to Google and Microsoft, are making significant pushes into the technology, which has been a mainstay of science fiction for decades but has largely failed to materialize as a viable consumer product. The latest piece of kit, the HTC Vive announced this weekend, is the product of a collaboration between the Taiwanese phone giant and Valve, the purveyor of the most important software distribution platform on the PC, Steam.

Virtual reality, or VR, has a long tortured history. Until three years ago, the technology was more or less moribund. Then Palmer Luckey (now 22), reignited interest with a series of prototypes for a new device called the Oculus Rift, which improved significantly on the old technology by taking advantage of advances in components for phones. His company, Oculus VR, was acquired by Facebook last year for $2 billion.

Most of Oculus’ advances, which are now being adopted or emulated by the likes of Sony and Samsung, are in how images are displayed to users wearing the headset. Long story short, a VR system has to display two sets of images—one for each eye—at very fast rates or the viewer will get nauseous.

But the HTC Vive, which the companies say will be available later this year, solves the next most vexing problems: once a viewer is seeing 3D space, how do they maneuver and manipulate the environment around them. Aside from content that is compatible with VR, these are the biggest outstanding questions. Once you’re there, what can you do and how do you do it?

Early development kits for the Oculus employ a standard console controller to move around, but that can be disorienting. Sony’s Morpheus prototype for the Playstation4 uses a set of controllers that look like ice cream cones with lightbulbs on top with similar results. And Microsoft’s recently unveiled HoloLens, which projects images onto the real world, uses hand gestures and arm motions. It’s still unclear which approach will win out.

HTC says its system will come with a base station that can track a user’s movements in 3D space. The company also hinted at a specific controller, perhaps a set of gloves, to enable users to manipulate virtual objects. Details are still scant, but this could solve the problems of mobility in a simulated 3D environment.

If Valve and HTC have indeed managed to do that, virtual reality may finally be ready for prime time.

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