TIME Media

This Is How YouTube Is Fighting its Amazon-Owned Rival

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AFP—AFP/Getty Images A picture shows a You Tube logo on December 4, 2012 during LeWeb Paris 2012 in Saint-Denis near Paris.

It's about to get better for livestreaming video games

YouTube announced Thursday that it will begin live streaming content at 60 frames per second, an important boost that will make it a better platform for streaming video game footage.

For now, the feature is exclusive to browsers compatible with HTML5 — the newest versions of most modern browsers should work fine. In browsers that work with YouTube’s HTML5 player, users will also be able to skip backwards in a livestream and catch up at 1.5x or 2x normal speed.

The changes appear squarely aimed at helping YouTube compete with Twitch, the gaming-focused live-streaming video site Amazon bought for $970 million last year. Twitch can broadcast live-streams at 60 FPS and has amassed a huge following of gaming fans, as well as partnerships with console manufacturers like Sony and Microsoft. Google was reportedly interested in snapping up Twitch to help expand YouTube. Instead, the two sites will be competitors as live streams of e-sports and other gaming content become more popular.

TIME Music

Watch Jay Z Bash Spotify, Apple and YouTube in Freestyle Rap

Jay Z is trying to promote his streaming service, Tidal

Jay Z, owner of music streaming service Tidal, slammed his biggest competitors in a freestyle rap in New York City this weekend.

Spotify, Apple, Google and YouTube were all part of Jay Z’s rap, his answer to the critics who’ve accused the artist of launching Tidal to make more money. It’s not the first time he’s defended his streaming service: Last month the rapper argued how Tidal was in fact doing pretty well, tweeting out a slew of #TidalFacts, some of which, well, didn’t turn out to be facts.

Read next: We Fact-Checked All of Jay Z’s #TidalFacts

TIME Courts

YouTube Should Not Have Been Forced to Take Down Anti-Muslim Video, Court Rules

A federal appeals court ruled in favor of Google on Monday

(SAN FRANCISCO)—In a victory for free speech advocates, a federal appeals court says YouTube should not have been forced to take down an anti-Muslim film that sparked violence in the Middle East and death threats to actors.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued its ruling in favor of Google on Monday. The decision comes after free speech advocates urged the court to overturn a 2-1 ruling by three 9th Circuit judges. That ruling ordered YouTube to take down the video.

Actress Cindy Lee Garcia wanted “Innocence of Muslims” removed from the site after receiving death threats. Her lawyer argued she had a copyright claim to the low-budget film because she believed she was acting in a different production.

Google, which owns YouTube, argued Garcia had no claim to the film because the filmmaker wrote the dialogue, managed the production and dubbed over her lines.

TIME Media

How Spotify Is Getting Ready For Apple’s Musical Onslaught

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Emmanuel Dunand—AFP/Getty Images A Spotify logo is seen as founder and CEO Daniel Ek addresses a press conference in New York, December 11, 2013.

The music streaming service could use original video to ensure its future

Spotify is the undisputed king of on-demand music services, but that crown alone may no longer be enough.

The Swedish streaming company is planning to host original videos on its service, according to the Wall Street Journal. Spotify has been in talks with YouTube programmers such as Maker Studios as well as traditional media companies for a move that would vastly expand the scope of what the music service offers. A Spotify spokesperson declined to comment, but the company is holding a media event in New York on May 20 where the video offering could be unveiled.

If Spotify steps into the video arena, it will be entering a crowded market dominated on one end by YouTube, which has 1 billion monthly users watching mostly short-form videos, and on the other end by Netflix, which has more than 60 million paying subscribers binge-watching television shows and movies. But video may be just what Spotify needs to ensure its long-term viability, music industry analysts say.

Though Spotify easily eclipses other streaming services in size with its 15 million paying subscribers, the pool in which the company is playing is shallow. The music industry generated about $15 billion in revenue for recorded music globally in 2014, according to the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry. Meanwhile, online video services made about $19 billion, according to the firm Digital TV Research, while they’re expected to generate more than $40 billion by 2020. It makes sense that Spotify wants a piece of that fast-growing pie.

“The music business is nice because people use it every day, but the problem is you don’t make a lot of money per minute of music listened to,” says James McQuivey, a media analyst at research firm Forrester. “Video has the ability to command more revenue.”

Original video would also help differentiate Spotify from its competitors at a key juncture. The company’s feature set and song library are extremely similar to services such as Tidal and the Apple-owned Beats Music, which makes Spotify highly susceptible to being knocked off its perch if a larger foe emerges. That could happen next month, when Apple may unveil an on-demand streaming service tied to the iTunes brand. Truly original video content will give customers a better reason to hang onto their Spotify subscription even after the arrival of an Apple service.

“I really do view this as being pre-emptive strike in what has become an increasingly competitive space,” says Larry Miller, a music business professor at New York University.

Spotify’s big-picture strategy could be similar to Netflix’s playbook, Miller says. Netflix was a digital warehouse for old TV shows and movies, facing escalating costs to license the rights for other studios’ content. Through orignal shows, the company has retooled its branding to make programs like House of Cards its primary draw. A Spotify with its own original content would feel less heat if some artists removed their music from the service, as Taylor Swift did last fall.

Still, there are drawbacks to the video plan. McQuivey says streaming video could dilute Spotify’s brand and confuse consumers who simply enjoy using the service as an online jukebox. And the costs for premium video would be considerably more than for music. Spotify is already losing money every year, but a recent funding round means it may have cash to throw at content makers.

“They’d have to go pretty big,” says McQuivey, who believes Spotify should pursue premium TV-like content rather than short-form videos found on YouTube. “You can’t just dabble in content. It’s not all or nothing, but it’s pretty close.”

More than anything, a shift to video would signal to fans and investors that Spotify has no intention of simply ceding its control of the streaming space to Apple or other big-name competitors. The startup made on-demand music streaming viable, and it wants to be around when the financial rewards are finally reaped.

“Strategically, this represents a significant risk that could end up paying enormous long-term dividends for Spotify if they are successful,” Miller says.

TIME viral

Watch Soccer Megastar Cristiano Ronaldo Stand Up for the Little Guy

Haters are going to struggle after watching this

It is true, multimillionaire footballer Cristiano Ronaldo just rubs some people the wrong way, but this video of the Real Madrid superstar defending a young Japanese boy attempting to speak Portuguese demonstrates his kinder side.

The video emerged Monday from a promotional event in Japan last year. In it, the boy opens with some basic greetings but begins to stumble over more complicated sentences.

When the audience laughs, Ronaldo, referring to the crowd, asks his translator off camera, “”Why they smile? Why? He speaks good Portuguese. Very good. They should be happy because he tries very hard.”

The audience was shamed into a bashful applause and Ronaldo earned some serious respect.

TIME Internet

Ryan Gosling Ate Cereal in Touching Tribute to Late Vine Star Ryan McHenry

"I feel very lucky to have been apart of his life in some small way"

On Sunday, Ryan McHenry, who made a name for himself by poking fun at the celebrity actor in his “Ryan Gosling Won’t Eat His Cereal” Vine series, lost his battle to osteosarcoma (a type of bone cancer) at the age of just 27.

And so on Monday night, Gosling recorded a heartfelt tribute to the man who brought humor to hundreds of thousands as well as providing a deeply personal insight into his battle against cancer.

While McHenry’s creativity brought smiles to fans’ faces, his honesty about his struggle with cancer was the real inspiration.

Below you can enjoy a YouTube compilation of “Ryan Gosling Won’t Eat His Cereal.”

Read next: Ryan Gosling Might Star in the Blade Runner Sequel

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MONEY Internet

Ten Years of YouTube Is More Than Just Kylie Jenner Challenge Videos

YouTube started 10 years ago with a simple video from a zoo. A decade later, some have described it as “the most valuable storytelling outlet our planet has ever seen.”

TIME technology

A Decade of YouTube Has Changed the Future of Television

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Samantha Sin—AFP/Getty Images www.youtube.com displayed on Aug. 2, 2006

YouTube's first video was uploaded on April 23, 2005

In the 1980s and ‘90s, anyone could turn on their local public access television channel and find moms doing yoga, talk shows focused on beer and local sports, or even strippers and porn stars cavorting between ads for 1-900 numbers (thanks for everything, Robin Byrd). Public access was revolutionary in that it gave everyone access to a broadcast platform—but, sadly, that platform could only reach those with the same cable provider. Neither international fame nor anything close to fortune ever came for those who were the superstars of the medium.

All that changed with YouTube.

The video sharing service posted its first video on April 23, 2005. (That video, Me at the Zoo, has subsequently been viewed 19 million times in 10 years.) YouTube changed everything about television, from public access to major networks. In one decade, YouTube has developed a culture of its own and is a threat to the conventional business model of television—but not in the way world expected.

YouTube was originally created to make it easy to upload videos and post them on blogs, a medium that was then pushing past the fringes of the Internet and into the mainstream. Quickly, YouTube became a destination of its own, one that traditional television producers thought they could harness to tap into the growing power of the Internet. The first clip I ever remember going to YouTube specifically to watch was Lazy Sunday, the first “Digital Short” produced by Saturday Night Live. It went on YouTube, iTunes and a few other websites on Dec. 17, 2005 and was perhaps the first viral video — particularly on YouTube, where it was free.

The Lazy Sunday story exemplifies early fears about YouTube. It racked up 5 million views but was pulled by NBC two months later. (These days you can visit Hulu or Yahoo Screen, platforms that didn’t even exist at the time, to watch it.) In YouTube’s infancy, many television, movie and music companies were worried that users would steal all of their copyrighted material and post it online for free.

That never really came to pass on a large scale. Instead, YouTube evolved as a platform that cooperated with television. For one thing, the company started taking down clips if the owners complained. To this day, it’s still nearly impossible to find a clip from The Simpsons on the site. In 2006, the same year that TIME named “You” the Person of the Year, YouTube entered into a marketing deal with NBC. In 2007 it partnered with CNN to ask the presidential candidates questions that were posted on YouTube and in 2012 it partnered with ABC to live stream the debates directly on the site.

And it wasn’t just a matter of working alongside television: YouTube has become integral to the success of many TV shows as the place where they post clips, highlights, trailers, previews, recaps and other goodies that don’t make their way directly into the show. Just this month Amy Schumer racked up 2 million views with her parody video “Milk Milk Lemonade,” which is really a preview of the upcoming third season of her Comedy Central show.

It’s been a boon for late night programs, the place where many Americans go to watch the antics of Jimmy Fallon and Jimmy Kimmel. Bill Maher does an extra segment of his HBO show Real Time, called Over Time, directly on YouTube. Getting videos to be shared widely is no longer an afterthought, but rather something that is integral to a show’s success and sometimes a means with its own end. Kimmel infamously created a fake “Twerk Fail” video that went viral with 18 million views and then went viral again when he exposed it as a hoax, gaining another 20 million clicks.

But just as television was starting to adapt to YouTube, with networks treating the site as a sidebar, the viewers started treating it more like a public access station. Around 2007, just as television was warming up to the site and the late night shows were gaining attention of viral videos, a new crop of stars started to emerge. With the ubiquity of video cameras in laptops and cell phones and the ease with which people can use digital editing software, it became easy for anyone to start their own YouTube channel and ride it to huge success. PewDiePie, which started in 2010 and is now the largest YouTube channel, with 37 million subscribers, is just a dude making funny voices while playing video games. Tyler Oakley (6 million subscribers, since 2007) just talks about his life and love of celebrities. Bethany Mota (8 million subscribers, since 2009) gained popularity for “haul videos” where she would show people what she just bought at the mall. Using YouTube’s ad-revenue sharing partner program (and even more lucrative endorsement deals), those gurus and stars stood to gain in ways that old-fashioned public-access creators couldn’t.

YouTube started developing its own culture and its own genres, from makeup tutorials and song parodies to GoPro skateboard theatrics and toy-unboxing videos. Television no longer has to worry about YouTube stealing their shows, because YouTube has plenty of shows of its own. YouTube even started calling them “channels” and in 2011 Google spent almost $200 million to launch their own original channels with partners like Madonna, Pharrell Williams, VICE and The Wall Street Journal.

YouTube serves as a source for some of television’s most innovative new ideas. Broad City, originally a web series, made the jump to become one of Comedy Central’s biggest and buzziest shows. Grace Helbig strated a YouTube channel in 2007 while bored at a house-sitting gig and now interviews celebrities on her E! talk show. VICE, the media company whose short documentaries are available on YouTube, just signed a huge deal with HBO to provide a daily news broadcast. Though television may still be more prestigious than the Internet, the creativity is online. And the public access nature of YouTube is starting to bleed onto mainstream television. Just last year, FYI network ordered 13 episodes of a show based on Epic Meal Time, an extreme cooking show that has almost 7 million subscribers.

YouTube is not only the future of television, but also preserving its past. It serves as an online time capsule preserving all sorts of things that we never had access to before. Want to watch an episode of the Gummi Bears, your favorite cartoon from your childhood? Find it on YouTube. Need a refresher on the lyrics to the Full House theme song? Thanks, YouTube. Want to watch all the fights from Dynasty? Thank God for YouTube.

Rather than pirating off and siphoning from television, YouTube serves to amplify it, cultivating our remembrance and interest, giving us reasons to tune in — where would John Oliver be without all the YouTube clips? — and creating ideas for future shows. YouTube has not only replaced public access television, a place where anyone could have a voice, but has perfected it, creating its own ecosystem that is a parallel to television. And these days, with teens thinking YouTube stars are bigger celebrities than the cast of the Big Bang Theory, it’s only a matter of time before public access takes over all the airwaves.

TIME viral

This Is What the ‘Charlie Bit My Finger’ Boys Look Like Now

Prepare to feel crazy old

The Charlie Bit My Finger! boys are all grown up!

With over 816 million views, the video is on the Mount Rushmore of early viral videos. Because of its fame, a BBC children’s reporter recently visited the boys’ home and discovered the 11-year-old Harry and his 9-year-old brother Charlie still have that knack for being adorable.

We also learned that the only reason the world even met the boys is because the original file was too large for their father Howard to upload to email.

The parents have used the video’s success to secure sponsorship deals and the kids have appeared in advertisements.

However, Charlie and Harry are no longer the only boys in the family vying for viral success as they now have two younger brothers.

Relive the classic “Charlie bit me” line below.

Read next: This Is a Baby’s Brain on Pain

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TIME apps

How to Keep the YouTube App If You Have an Old iPhone or iPad

Google is ending support for the video app on many old devices

If you’re still clinging to your first iPhone from 2009, Google is giving you one more reason to upgrade. The company is ending support for its YouTube app on many devices manufactured before 2013, including a number of Apple gadgets, because of upgrades to YouTube’s platform. Here’s a quick guide to which devices are affected and what you can do to hang onto YouTube.

iOS

Apple phones will have to run iOS 7 or iOS 8 in order to be compatible with YouTube. If you have the original iPhone, the iPhone 3G, or the iPhone 3GS, you’re simply out of luck, since they don’t support either operating system. iPhone 4S and iPhone 5 users who have never upgraded their operating system can update to iOS 8 to get access to YouTube. iPhone 4 users who already have iOS 7 will still have access to YouTube, but those who never upgraded will be out of luck because Apple now only offers iOS 8, which is not supported on the iPhone 4.

On the iPad front, only the original iPad will no longer be compatible with YouTube. Other users with old iPads can just upgrade to Apple’s latest OS to use the YouTube app.

Apple TV

The third-generation Apple TV can be upgraded to support YouTube by selecting “Settings,” then “General,” then “Upgrade Software” in the device’s menu. First and second-generation Apple TVs, which were on sale before 2012, will no longer support the YouTube app at all.

Other Devices

Sony and Panasonic TV and Blu-ray players that use Google TV may not run the YouTube app. Devices that only support version 1 and version 2 of Google TV won’t be compatible with YouTube, while newer devices that support version 3 and version 4 will run the video app.

Even on devices that don’t support YouTube’s app, users can still navigate to YouTube’s mobile site in their web browsers to watch videos.

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