TIME Social Networking

Facebook: World Cup Visitors Made 2 New Friends

According to data provided to TIME exclusively from Facebook

World Cup soccer is for making new friends, according to Facebook data, at least.

On average, a visitor who checked into a World Cup stadium on Facebook last month made on average one new Brazilian friend and one friend from another country, according to data provided exclusively by Facebook to TIME and charted in the graphs below.

new_friendships[5]

Americans seem to have been some of the most gregarious World Cup visitors, forming the most new friendships with Brazilians during the games and sparking web-relationships with visitors from Great Britain, Australia, Mexico, Colombia and Canada. Visitors from Australia, Argentina, Mexico and Great Britain rounded out the top five countries whose residents were actively forming friendships with Brazilians during the World Cup.

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An estimated 3.7 million people traveled throughout Brazil during the 2014 FIFA World Cup, and as visitors from around the world hit the myriad stadiums where countries met their futbol fate, they checked in on Facebook over 1 million times. Arrival check-ins peaked on day one of the tournament, when Brazil toppled Croatia 3-1. World Cup stadium check-ins peaked on the tournament’s final day.

first_checkins[6]

The final match between Germany and Argentina on July 13 had the most overall check-ins, according to the data, though the opening match was a close second. In all, there were about 236,600 check-ins to Rio de Janeiro’s Maranca stadium.

stadium_checkins_viz_final[5]

MONEY

Germany vs. Argentina in 9 Numbers

When the World Cup ends on Sunday, we'll know whether Germany or Argentina can claim victory. In the meantime, here's a look at how the residents of Berlin and Buenos Aires win and lose financially.

TIME World Cup

Watch Every World Cup Goal in 1 Minute

With a total of 171 goals after the final match, the 2014 World Cup in Brazil tied the record for most goals scored, which was previously held by the 1998 World Cup in France

TIME

Pictures of the Week: July 4 — July 11

From Israel’s deadly air offensive in Gaza and Brazil’s humiliating World Cup exit to French Fashion week’s modern attitude and a double wedding for wounded Ukrainian paratroopers, TIME presents the best photos of the week.

TIME world cup 2014

WATCH: Brazilian Women’s Love/Hate Relationship With World Cup Tourists

Contradictory reports abound

“The World Cup is God’s gift to women,” Brazilian 22-year-old Renata de Mouro Moitinho told the AP while resting from a dance with an Italian man in Rio. “There are so many men everywhere these days, it’s amazing.”

Stories about Brazilian women celebrating the “man bonanza” of the World Cup have abounded on the Internet, but so have articles featuring complaints that male visitors are treating Brazilian women with disrespect. The stereotype that Brazilian women are overtly sexual, which some observers claim male football fans have been exploiting during their World Cup trips, clashes with the host country’s identity as the largest Catholic country in the world.

 

TIME World Cup

World Cup Players’ Crazy Haircuts

From mohawks to dreadlocks, these World Cup players have quite the array of styles

TIME Soccer

Mick Jagger Is Being Blamed for Brazil’s World Cup Thrashing

Brazil v Germany: Semi Final - 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil
Brazil fans hold up a poster of Mick Jagger during the World Cup semifinal match between Brazil and Germany in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on July 8, 2014 Chris Brunskill Ltd/Getty

To paraphrase the song, Brazil was "removed by Jagger, removed by Jagger..."

Mick Jagger has an abysmal record at the World Cup. Not simply because the Rolling Stones singer supports his national side — the perennially disappointing England — but because he has developed a reputation for jinxing any team he supports. And after the 7-1 thrashing Germany unleashed on Brazil, he has ensured that his legendary curse will go down in history — at least in the eyes of Brazilians.

The legend of Jagger’s Jinx began in South Africa during the 2010 World Cup, where he attended matches to support England, the U.S. and Brazil in separate games — and saw all of them defeated. Brazilians supposedly blamed Jagger for their 2010 loss to the Netherlands on a Brazilian shirt he wore.

When the World Cup kicked off in Brazil, locals were understandably anxious to ward off Jagger’s bad mojo. He was nicknamed Pé Frio — literally “cold foot,” which is used to describe a person who brings bad luck.

With the Rolling Stones on tour during the group stages of the World Cup, soccer fans hoped he would be too distracted to do any harm. But, as AP noted in a report dated June 25, this was not to be realized:

At a concert in Rome on Saturday night, Jagger predicted to 70,000 fans that four-time World Cup champion Italy would pull off a clutch victory over Uruguay to advance to the knockout phase. The Italians lost 1-0 Tuesday and were headed home after the tournament’s first round.

At a show in Lisbon in May, the singer predicted that Portugal, led by Cristiano Ronaldo, the game’s top player heading into the World Cup, would win it all at the monthlong tournament in Brazil. Portugal is on the brink of elimination after failing to win in its first two group matches.

Earlier in the World Cup, Jagger suffered some good-hearted ridicule after taking to Twitter on June 19 to urge on his native England in a game, also with Uruguay. ‘Let’s go England! This is the one to win!!,’ he wrote. England lost.

Brazil v Germany: Semi Final - 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil
Mick Jagger, in cap, looks on during the World Cup semifinal match between Brazil and Germany in Belo Horizonte, Brazil (Photo by Chris Brunskill Ltd/Getty Images)

Finally, Jagger turned up in Belo Horizonte for the semifinal to cheer on the host nation with his Brazilian son Lucas. Despite wearing an England cap, Pé Frio sat down to witness, along with thousands of dismayed fans of the yellow and green, reportedly the worst home loss ever in Brazilian soccer as well as the most one-sided defeat in a semifinal game in World Cup history. When it comes to soccer, Jagger just can’t get, or give, no satisfaction.

[Dirty Tackle]

TIME world cup 2014

5 Reasons Brazil Will Lose to Germany (and 3 Reasons It Won’t)

Brazil v Colombia: Quarter Final - 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil
Neymar lies injured while Marcelo shows concern looking over him during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Quarter Final match between Brazil and Colombia at Estadio Castelao in Fortaleza, Brazil on July 4, 2014. Lars Baron—FIFA/Getty Images

The pre-tournament favorite Brazil isn't playing much like it at the moment. Here's why Brazil could lose the in the World Cup 2014 semifinals to Germany.

The World Cup reaches the semifinals this week, starting with Germany taking on host Brazil. A day later, Argentina faces the Netherlands. Although the pre-tournament favorite, Brazil hasn’t done much to back up that designation. Here’s why it could be the end of the road for the Seleção.

1) No-Mar
With Neymar out of the World Cup with a fractured vertebra, the Brazilians not only have lost their best scorer, they’ve lost their talisman, and to some degree their hope. Neymar was willing to put Brazil on his back and carry it. He’s a player whose value extends beyond his incredible skills. And with Thiago Silva suspended because of his own stupidity in getting a second yellow card, Brazil has lost its defensive anchor, too.

2) Brazil’s strikers need to add a syllable (and some goals)
Fred. Hulk. Jo. Brazilian players often go by one name—Pele, Ronaldo, Ronaldinho—but its current crop of monosyllabic frontrunners have come up short on goals. Buy a vowel. That’s why players such as Willian and Ramires need to step in Neymar’s absence.

3) The team is mediocre
It may be the worst thing you can say about Brazil, but it’s what Colombia’s players remarked after the game against them—which Colombia lost 2-1 on two set pieces rather than from the run of play. Mexico players were likewise unimpressed after El Tri’s scoreless draw with the Seleção. The magic that marked great Brazilian teams—when three or four players could each do amazing things— is missing from this outfit. Even worse: teams no longer fear Brazil. Germany certainly won’t be intimidated.

4) Brazil is playing like a team that’s afraid of losing
There’s more pressure on this team than any team in the history of football. How could it not get to them? In fact, it has. Neymar’s loss gives Brazil’s team a soul-saving excuse should it lose to Germany, not exactly a motivating thought.

5) Germany isn’t Colombia
Or even Mexico, and that’s not a good thing. Brazil thrives in a wide-open, up-and-down game. Germany is not likely to allow that kind of freedom, as it showed against France. If the Germans cut down on the space, Brazil is going to find it awfully tough going. So are the spectators.

And here, three reasons not to give up on Brazil

1) It got to the semis, didn’t it?
Brazil has won 4 games and tied one, and although none of those results have been pretty to watch, the team has managed to find a way to progress. Against Colombia, it found a way through a corner kick and a piece of powerful artistry from David Luiz on a magnificent free kick.

2) Again, Germany isn’t Colombia.
Or even Mexico, and that’s a good thing. The Germans have looked less impressive with each subsequent game after pole-axing a weak Portuguese team in their opening match. Against France, it reverted to a circa 1986 model of play, with lots of possession in the back and little going forward. And the winning goal? A header by one of its giant backs after winning a free kick. Boring old Germany.

3) It’s the World Cup and it’s in Brazil.
The script has been written, and Brazil just has to play to play its part. Certainly, the crowd at the Estadio Mineirao in Belo Horizonte is going to turn the joint into a noise avalanche. Brazil’s players just need to ride it to victory.

TIME world cup 2014

2 Dead, 19 Injured in World Cup Highway Collapse

Fire department personnel work to retrieve a car from underneath a collapsed bridge in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, Thursday, July 3, 2014.
Fire department personnel work to retrieve a car from underneath a collapsed bridge in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, Thursday, July 3, 2014. Victor R. Caivano—AP

The collapsed overpass was under construction for the tournament

At least two people were killed when a highway overpass collapsed Thursday in Belo Horizonte, one of the Brazilian cities hosting the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The rubble trapped a commuter bus, a car and two construction trucks, Brazilian authorities said. An official who wished to remain anonymous told the Associated Press that 19 additional people were injured in the accident.

The overpass that fell was under construction, one of the many infrastructure projects undertaken for the World Cup that is still unfinished. It lay about three miles from the Mineirao stadium, where the semifinal game will be played Tuesday.

One of the people killed was a woman who was driving the commuter bus.

[AP]

TIME Soccer

Belgium’s Vincent Kompany Gives Huge Shout-Out to U.S. Goalie Tim Howard

Goalkeeper Howard of the U.S. blocks a shot from Belgium's Kompany during their 2014 World Cup round of 16 game at the Fonte Nova arena in Salvador
U.S. Goalkeeper Tim Howard blocks a shot from Belgium's Vincent Kompany during their World Cup match at the Fonte Nova arena in Salvador, Brazil, on July 1, 2014 Yves Herman—Reuters

Belgium defeated Team USA 2-1 in extra time to reach the World Cup quarterfinals, and the victorious captain had nothing but praise for the veteran American goalkeeper

Vincent Kompany, the captain of Belgium’s national men’s soccer team, made a classy move by praising the extraordinary performance of American goalkeeper Tim Howard following Team USA’s valiant 2-1 defeat in the last 16 of the World Cup.

Respect is right. Howard kept America’s bleak quarterfinal hopes alive after making a record 16 saves, the most by a goalkeeper at the World Cup since stats were first tracked by officials in 1966.

Kompany’s praise was, naturally, flanked by American support for their most valuable player. One fan even changed the Wikipedia entry for the U.S. Secretary of Defense to America’s favorite brick wall.

Others took to Twitter to honor one of — if not, the best — goalkeeper in U.S. history.

 

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