TIME Sports

Watch Serena Williams and Novak Djokovic Dance to the Bee Gees

Djokovic and Williams brought back a Wimbledon tradition, with a twist

After defeating Roger Federer in four sets in the Wimbledon finals, Novak Djokovic said he was going to ask women’s champion, Serena Williams, to dance—and he did just that at the 2015 Champions’ Dinner thrown, this year, in their honor.

A Champions Dance was a Wimbledon tradition for years, but when the Champions’ Dinner moved dates and venues in 1977, the custom disappeared and was never officially brought back.

That didn’t stop Djokovic from inviting Williams, now a 21-time Grand Slam champion, to celebrate their 2015 Wimbledon championships on the dance floor. Djokovic called the dance a “tradition that was a bit forgotten,” and, according to the AP, suggested to Williams and the chairman of the All England Club, Philip Brook, that they bring it back. “They accepted it, fortunately,” Djokovic said.

While Djokovic initially claimed to have wanted to waltz with Williams, she reportedly wanted something more uptempo. Check out the two tennis greats throwing down to the Bee Gees “Night Fever,” all decked out in their formal attire. While Djokovic may have some serious moves on the tennis court, he might need more practice before championing the dance floor.

TIME India

India Wins Three Titles at Wimbledon in Nation’s Best Ever Year at Tournament

Veteran champion Leander Paes and world No. 1 Sania Mirza were joined by 17-year-old Sumit Nagal

It was a big weekend for India at the All England Lawn Tennis Club, with the country’s tennis stars (both established and upcoming) winning three Wimbledon doubles titles at the sport’s iconic grass court tournament.

While Swiss maestro Roger Federer fell just short of becoming the oldest-ever Wimbledon singles champion — a month before his 34th birthday — in his four-set loss to Serbia’s Novak Djokovic, 42-year-old Indian veteran Leander Paes had little resistance strolling to his fifth Wimbledon doubles title alongside Federer’s compatriot Martina Hingis. The duo crushed Austria’s Alexander Peya and Hungary’s Timea Babos 6-1, 6-1 in just 40 minutes in Sunday’s mixed doubles final.

It was the second title in as many days for 1997 Wimbledon singles champion Hingis, who captured the women’s doubles crown with India’s world No. 1 Sania Mirza with a hard-earned victory against Elena Vesnina and Ekaterina Makarova. Mirza and Hingis overcame a 5-2 deficit in the third set against the Russian pair to win 5-7, 7-6, 7-5.

“Every kid that picks up a tennis racquet talks about winning Wimbledon or playing at Wimbledon one day, and I think I’m speaking for both of us: we feel privileged to be here,” said Mirza, who also has mixed-doubles titles at the Australian, French and U.S. Opens to her credit.

“Usually you’re lucky to win it once,” Hingis said. “It’s above my expectations.”

Their victory also resulted in some controversy on Indian social media, with British broadcaster BBC’s India edition leaving Mirza out of its tweet regarding the result. “Hingis wins Wimbledon doubles final,” the now-deleted tweet read, prompting angry reactions from several Indian netizens.

BBC India later issued a corrected tweet and apologized for excluding Mirza’s name.

While Paes and Hingis were steamrolling their way to the crown on Centre Court, 17-year-old Sumit Nagal was on one of the smaller courts giving the South Asian nation a cherry on its tennis cake. Nagal and his partner, Vietnam’s Nam Hoang Ly, defeated American-Japanese pair Reilly Opelka and Akira Santillan to win the boys’ doubles title.

“I never thought I would do anything like this ever,” Nagal said, in an interview with Indian news channel NDTV. “Coming from such a big country like India, it’s even more special.”

Read next: See a Victorious Serena Williams Hold Up Her Wimbledon Trophy

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TIME tennis

See a Victorious Serena Williams Hold Up Her Wimbledon Trophy

tennis wimbledon serena williams championship
Leon Neal—AFP/Getty Images Serena Williams celebrates with the winner's trophy, the Venus Rosewater Dish, after her women's singles final victory over Spain's Garbine Muguruza on day twelve of the 2015 Wimbledon Championships at The All England Tennis Club in Wimbledon, southwest London on July 11, 2015.

Serena Williams won her sixth Wimbledon title on Saturday and now holds all four Grand Slam titles at once, for her second "Serena Slam"

Read the full story here

TIME royals

Prince William and Kate Middleton Enjoy Afternoon Date at Wimbledon

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (L) and Prince William (R), Duke of Cambridge attend the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships in London on July 8, 2015.
Alex Broadway—Anadolu Agency/Getty Images Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (L) and Prince William (R), Duke of Cambridge attend the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships in London on July 8, 2015.

With the children at home

Prince William and Princess Kate left the kids at home on Wednesday for a soggy afternoon date at Wimbledon’s Centre Court. (But hey, no kids!)

The parents of Prince George and Princess Charlotte – who just celebrated Charlotte’s christening on Sunday – were in the stands to watch local favorite Andy Murray play his quarter-final match against Canada’s Vasek Pospisil. (The score is currently 3-1 to Murray.)

Sitting in the royal box on a rainy afternoon, Kate – sporting new, shorter layers around her face – wore a $384 cardinal red Cayla Long Dress from LK Bennett, as she and William, in a suit and tie, watched the grand slam event after arriving in a Jaguar.

When the rain stopped play after 15 minutes, William and Kate chatted with other members of the royal box, including William’s aunt Sophie, Countess of Wessex, ex-Wimbledon champion Billie Jean King and Prince Albert of Monaco.

Also in attendance: William’s cousin, Zara Phillips, and David Beckham, who brought along his 12-year-old son Romeo.

William and Kate, both 33, are avid Wimbledon fans and have played tennis against each other since their student days at St Andrews University – even using a public tennis court in her hometown of Bucklebury.

They also plan to upgrade the tennis court at their country home, Anmer Hall, to include an AstroTurf surface, copper beach border and surrounding oak trees.

Kate’s sister Pippa Middleton, attended the tournament on Monday, and her mom Carole and mother-in-law Camilla had a friendly meet-up there on Friday.

This article originally appeared on People.com

TIME tennis

Australian Sporting Icon Tells the Country’s Top Two Tennis Players to ‘Go Back to Where Their Parents Came From’

Former Australian swimmer Dawn Fraser smiles during a Reuters interview in Sydney
© Daniel Munoz / Reuters—REUTERS Former Australian swimmer Dawn Fraser smiles during a Reuters interview in Sydney April 7, 2011.

"We don't need them here in this country to act like that," says veteran Olympian Dawn Fraser

Legendary Australian swimmer Dawn Fraser has apologized for the inflammatory remarks she made about Nick Kyrgios, the Australian tennis player who is being accused of throwing his fourth-round match at Wimbledon against Richard Gasquet.

On Tuesday, the morning after Kyrgios’ controversial defeat, Fraser appeared on Australia’s Today Show to decry his behavior on the court as “absolutely disgusting,” and to advise him and fellow Australian tennis player Bernard Tomic to “go back to where their parents came from.”

“We don’t need them here in this country to act like that,” she said.

Kyrgios was born in Canberra but is of Malaysian and Greek heritage; Tomic was born in Germany but moved to Australia in 1996, when he was 3 years old.

After Fraser’s remarks, Kyrgios posted a message to Facebook calling her a bigot and denouncing what he saw as a double standard.

“Throwing a racket, brat. Debating the rules, disrespectful. Frustrated when competing, spoilt. Showing emotion, arrogant. Blatant racist, Australian legend,” he wrote.

Fraser apologized shortly thereafter in a public statement, though she did not redact her chief complaint — that Kyrgios, who currently faces a possible $20,000 in fines for his behavior at Wimbledon, acted unbecomingly.

“Australians have a rich sporting heritage made up of individuals from a variety of different countries of origin,” she said. “Nick’s representing Australia, and I want to see him representing Australian tennis in the best possible light … Not only do you represent yourself, your team, your fans and your family but you are representing the heritage of the competition and acting as a role model for young Australians.”

Fraser, who is 77, earned eight Olympic swimming medals for Australia between 1956 and 1964. She attracted some national controversy at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, when authorities accused her of swimming across the moat surrounding Emperor Hirohito’s palace to steal an Olympic flag.

TIME tennis

Novak Djokovic Says He Isn’t Guilty of Cheating

Boodles Tennis Challenge
Reuters Staff — Reuters Serbia's Novak Djokovic in action at the Boodles Tennis Challenge in Stoke Park, Buckinghamshire, England, on June 26, 2015

His denial comes after coach Boris Becker reportedly suggested that he had a method of signaling to the player during matches

Novak Djokovic says he hasn’t broken rules prohibiting communication between players and coaches during matches, but conceded that players did find ways to communicate with their teams when they’re on the court.

The world tennis No. 1 was questioned by reporters about his coach Boris Becker’s reported suggestion that the team had a method of signaling to Djokovic if his game was going well or not, CNN says.

Communication “of any kind, audible or visible, between a player and a coach” is strictly prohibited in tennis, according to ATP World Tour rules.

Djokovic attempted to clarify the suggestion on Sunday. “There are times when, you know, the team of the player communicates with the player when he gets to go and take the towel in the corner, which is closer to the box, or, you know, different ways,” Djokovic told reporters. “I think it’s all fine as long as it’s not regular. I think it just depends.”

He added that he thought players regularly found ways around the rule, CNN reports.

“This is a very competitive sport. You’re alone on the court,” Djokovic told reporters. “We can’t pretend like that’s not happening in tennis.”

[CNN]

TIME tennis

Chris Evert: Serena Williams Is the Greatest of All-Time

Williams’ French Open victory was her 20th major win, four behind the women’s all-time career record.
Clive Brunskill—Getty Images Williams’ French Open victory was her 20th major win, four behind the women’s all-time career record.

With Wimbledon approaching, Williams is chasing history

Serena Williams owns 20 Grand Slam singles titles, just four short of Margaret Court’s record 24, and two behind Steffi Graf’s 22. But one tennis legend—who has a cool 18 major titles herself—isn’t waiting for Williams to break the record to declare her the best women’s player ever. “She is the greatest of all-time,” says Chris Evert, who spoke to TIME for our profile of Serena Williams that appears in the June 29 issue, available on newsstands starting Friday.

Evert cites Williams’ record in the finals of Grand Slam tournaments—20-4—and her lack of a rival as reasons for declaring her the GOAT. The absence of a consistent challenger for Williams usually works against her in this debate. After all, Court had Billie Jean King, Evert had Martina Navratilova, Graf had Monica Seles. Any of these Hall of Famers would dominate the competition Williams is currently facing—and pile up major championships.

Five or six years ago, Evert says, she bought the argument. But not anymore. “After watching her matches and watching her closely, these players get close, they’re doing really well, and then she’ll get to another level where she slaps winners and she starts acing people,” says Evert. “It’s not one level. All of a sudden, she’s up two or three levels better than the field. It’s not about the other women. It’s about how good Serena is.”

Evert is rooting for Williams to become the first player since Graf in 1988 to win the calendar year Grand Slam—a sweep of the Australian, French, and U.S. Opens, plus Wimbledon, which starts on June 29. She’s halfway there, having become the first player since Jennifer Capriati in 2001 to win the Australian and the French (the U.S. Open begins in late August).

“I think we want to look up to somebody larger than life, and kind of go along for the ride,” says Evert. “We like to be in awe of somebody, it’s superhuman what they do, it’s just nice to feel like you’re part of that journey with them.”

TIME Television

Andy Samberg and Kit Harington to Team Up In HBO’s Wimbledon Mockumentary

Spike TV's "Guys Choice" Awards - Arrivals
Jason LaVeris—FilmMagic LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 07: Actor Andy Samberg attends Spike TV's "Guys Choice" Awards at Sony Studios on June 7, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic)

Tennis, anyone?

Andy Roddick and Andy Murray are about to be joined by a new tennis-playing Andy: Andy Samberg. The comedian will not be playing at the U.S. Open any time soon, but he will be honing his backhand to play a tennis bad boy opposite Game of Thrones star Kit Harington (a.k.a. Jon Snow) in an upcoming HBO mockumentary called 7 Days in Hell.

Samberg will play “tennis’ superstar bad boy” Aaron Williams, who is up against Harington’s Charles Poole, “a tennis prodigy and certified truck driver,” facing off during a legendary seven-day match at Wimbledon, according to Deadline. While the story sounds far-fetched, it has roots in reality. Back in 2010, Wimbledon hosted an epic match between John Isner and Nicolas Mahut, who battled it out for 11 hours over three days, with Isner eventually winning, 70-68 in the fifth set.

Rounding out the cast of the mockumentary will be Fred Armisen, Lena Dunham, Karen Gillan (as a supermodel and Charles’s childhood best friend), Howie Mandel, Soledad O’Brien (as herself), Michael Sheen and Mary Steenburgen (as Charles’s crazed mother). Nebraska stars Will Forte and June Squibb will reunite on screen as well, with Forte playing a tennis historian.

The HBO original was written by Girls and American Dad! writer Murray Miller and is based on a concept by Miller and Samberg. SNL and Funny or Die’s Jake Szymanski will direct.

MORE: A Conversation with Andy Samberg: Cops, Cuckoos and Comedy

MORE: The Best Theory About Jon Snow’s Mother

TIME tennis

Novak Djokovic Denies Roger Federer a (Final?) Wimbledon

Novak Djokovic kisses the trophy after defeating Roger Federer in the men's singles final at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, on July 6, 2014
Ben Curtis—AP Novak Djokovic kisses the trophy after defeating Roger Federer in the men's singles final at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, on July 6, 2014

The Serbian star played just enough defense to win his second Wimbledon title and regain the world's top ranking

Roger Federer had one of the best service sets of his beautiful career during Sunday’s Wimbledon final. He was tied a set a piece with Novak Djokovic, the top seed of this year’s tournament. On serve, Federer treated Djokovic like a junior: he aced him again and again, 13 in all, to Djokovic’s one. Some games were barely competitive.

Federer still lost that set. And eventually, the match.

A locked-in Djokovic held his own serves in that crucial third set, and took the tiebreaker that put him a set up. Federer, who was seeking a record eighth Wimbledon title, wouldn’t go quietly; he staved off a 5-2 Djokovic lead and a championship point, in a dizzying fourth set to force a fifth. It was the first Wimbledon final to go the distance since Federer won his 2009 classic over Andy Roddick (final score of that fifth set — 16-14).

Djokovic, circa 2008, likely would have wilted after blowing such a golden opportunity. And Federer, as we once knew him, would have finished Djokovic off. But this is a new era: Djokovic reclaimed the world’s top ranking with his close-to-classic 6-7 (7-9), 6-4, 7-6 (7-4), 5-7, 6-4 victory over Federer.

The match won’t be remembered like Rafael Nadal’s marathon win over Federer in the 2008 final. Still, it was a gripping match, one of the best finals in recent Grand Slam history. Early on, Federer wasn’t showing his age. He was moving with authority and confusing Djokovic with his tactical approach, sometimes playing a serve-and-volley game, sometimes staying home on the baseline, where his racket was a magic wand putting the ball in at seemingly impossible angles. We’ve seen that Federer at Wimbledon so many times before.

Not that Djokovic didn’t make Federer pay when he approached the net: he hit 14 passing shots for winners, to Federer’s two. Federer served big throughout the match: he had 29 aces, to Djokovic’s 13. But when the ball was in play, Djokovic’s reach and quickness — he hustled so hard, he fell a few times on Wimbledon’s worn grass — enabled him to play just enough defense to wear down Federer, who smacked championship point into the net.

Was this Federer’s last chance at a Slam? He turns 33 in August, and if he was going to steal one more title, it was probably going to be his favorite one, Wimbledon. Federer has 17 Slams, while Rafael Nadal, five years his junior, has 14, including nine at the French Open. Even if Nadal falls short everywhere else but clay, he could eclipse Federer’s record.

But that won’t be easy, thanks to this Djokovic fellow. It’s easy to obsess over the Roger-Rafa title chase, while forgetting that Djokovic is, you know, the best player in the world. Since his monster 2011, when he won every Slam but the French, Djokovic has just won two Australian Opens. Not a bad haul, but coming into this match, he had lost three straight Grand Slam finals, including a four-setter to Nadal in this year’s French. Djokovic is close to breaking through at Roland Garros — winning that title would give him a career Grand Slam.

After the match, an emotional Djokovic announced that he was about to become a father; his future wife is six months pregnant. He called Wimbledon “the best tournament in the world, the most valuable one” and you know something, he’s right: it’s the Masters of tennis, the tournament with the most prestige. His second Wimbledon title is his sweetest, especially after defeating the seven-time champ in five sets. Federer stood by the net, gracious, as Djokovic spoke. The closest, perhaps, he’ll ever get to the Wimbledon trophy again.

TIME Pictures of the Week

Pictures of the Week: June 27 – July 4

From the killing of three kidnapped Israeli teenagers and Tim Howard’s World Cup heroics to the beginning of Ramadan and Hurricane Arthur photographed from space, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

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