TIME Web

Here’s How Microsoft Is Fighting Revenge Porn

Microsoft's Bing website.
Newscast Limited/AP Microsoft's Bing website.

It's easier to request the removal of images from Bing

Microsoft is making it easier for victims of revenge porn to remove images and URLs they find hurtful and embarrassing from Bing search results. The news was disclosed Wednesday in a blog post by Jacqueline Beauchere, the company’s chief online safety officer. Revenge porn refers to the practice of an estranged spouse or partner posting intimate pictures or other materials on the Internet to “shame” the other person.

Beauchere pointed to a new reporting page that consumers can use to register the problematic links and photos and said Microsoft will remove those links and videos from Bing search results. And, it will “remove access to the content itself when shared on OneDrive or Xbox Live, when we are notified by a victim,” Beauchere wrote. This appears to go quite a bit further than what Google did, when it announced its plan to remove images from search results on request last month. Google’s web form posted July 9.

People could already report the offending images, but the reporting page will make the process easier. It is available now in English with other languages to come soon. Images will be removed globally, she said.

Microsoft Bing hovers at just over 20% of desktop Internet search market share in the U.S., according to the latest Comscore numbers. Google stands at about 64% share. On Microsoft’s earnings call Tuesday, the company’s chief executive officer Satya Nadella said he expects Bing to “transition to profitability” in the next fiscal year.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

TIME Web

Grooveshark Co-Founder Joshua Greenberg, 28, Found Dead at Florida Home

No cause of death could be determined, although Gainesville police said they had ruled out both foul play and suicide

Grooveshark co-founder Joshua Greenberg was found dead on July 19 at his home in Gainesville, Fla., according to a statement released by local police via Twitter.

The department wrote that there was “no evidence of foul play or suicide” in the death of the 28-year-old. The cause of death was not immediately known. Lori Greenberg, Joshua’s mother, told the Gainesville Sun that a medical examiner’s autopsy had offered no answers and full toxicology results will not be back for at least two months. “They are as baffled as I am,” she said.

It had been a difficult time for Greenberg: Grooveshark, which he started with classmates in 2007 as a streaming website based on users’ own uploaded files, shut down in April after a string of legal battles in which record companies alleged copyright infringement. The final blow came on May 1 when a court ordered Grooveshark parent company, Escape Media Group, to close the site permanently and pay $50 million to rights holders. Nevertheless, Lori told the Sun that her son had been relieved rather than depressed about the outcome and had moved on to other projects.

A letter authored by Greenberg and his co-founders posted on the site offered an apology for “very serious mistakes.” Despite the founders’ good intentions, it says, “we failed to secure licenses from rights holders for the vast amount of music on the service. That was wrong. We apologize. Without reservation.”

TIME Web

Reddit Takes Stand Against ‘Unfettered Free Speech’

Here's what you can and can't post on Reddit

Reddit is clamping down on controversial content.

The popular website’s CEO Steve Huffman fielded questions on Thursday in an Ask Me Anything (AMA) about what content is and isn’t allowed on the popular online bulletin board, amid a controversy over the company’s alleged content policing and lack of transparency.

“As Reddit has grown, we’ve seen additional examples of how unfettered free speech can make Reddit a less enjoyable place to visit, and can even cause people harm outside of Reddit,” Huffman wrote.

In addition to non-consensual pornography, which Reddit banned officially earlier this year, the following types of content are being “considered” for restriction, Huffman wrote in the AMA:

  • Spam
  • Anything illegal (i.e. things that are actually illegal, such as copyrighted material. Discussing illegal activities, such as drug use, is not illegal)
  • Publication of someone’s private and confidential information
  • Anything that incites harm or violence against an individual or group of people (it’s ok to say “I don’t like this group of people.” It’s not ok to say, “I’m going to kill this group of people.”)
  • Anything that harasses, bullies, or abuses an individual or group of people (these behaviors intimidate others into silence)
  • Sexually suggestive content featuring minors

Huffman also told users that several notorious, offensive subreddits—the “really dark side” of Reddit, as some have said—would be banned, including a thread about raping women.

The clarification of Reddit’s free speech limits, and, perhaps more importantly, the audience-facing, participatory way in which the restrictions were explained, arrive after months of user complaints over Reddit administrators’ lack of transparency when policies are changed.

Much of the community’s anger had been directed at former interim CEO Ellen Pao, who last week stepped down as chief after hundreds of thousands of people signed a petition calling for her ousting. Though Pao acknowledged the company’s lack of communication with users, she maintained her belief in restricting certain content in a Washington Post op-ed on Thursday, writing that she is “rooting for the humans over the trolls.”

Read next: Inside the Trouble at Reddit

TIME Web

Microsoft Says its New Browser Is Insanely Fast

Inside The Windows Floor At A BigCamera Inc. Store As Microsoft Corp. Begins To Sell Surface 3
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images The logo for Microsoft Corp.'s Surface 3 LTE tablet is displayed on the device at a Bic Camera Inc. electronics store in Tokyo, Japan, on Friday, June 19, 2015.

It beat Chrome and Safari in speed tests

Microsoft’s new replacement for Internet Explorer appears to be faster than its competitors. The new web browser, called Microsoft Edge, beat Google’s Chrome and Apple’s Safari browsers in a series of JavaScript benchmarks conducted by Microsoft.

According to a Microsoft blog post, Edge was 112% faster, 11% faster and 37% faster than Chrome in three different speed tests. Chrome surpassed Internet Explorer as the most popular browser in the U.S. last year in large part thanks to its speediness.

Consumers will get a chance to try Edge for themselves when it launches as the default browser with Windows 10 on July 29. One of the browser’s main selling points is its deep integration with Cortana, Microsoft’s Siri-like virtual assistant, as well as the ability to mark up web pages with sharable annotations.

Microsoft isn’t yet killing off Internet Explorer completely, both it and Edge will co-exist in Windows 10 for now.

TIME Web

Here’s How People Make Money From Viral Videos

Today - Season 63
NBC NewsWire—NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images Grumpy Cat appears on NBC News' "Today" show.

Sure, your kitten is cute. But can he help pay the rent?

Andy Warhol famously introduced the idea that someday everyone would be world famous for 15 minutes. But if the pop artist had lived long enough to watch some web videos, you have to think he’d change his timeframe to 15 seconds. That’s because everyone from pet owners to parents are looking to cash in viral videos these days.

But when it comes to web video, does fame equal fortune? That depends on how much money you expect to make. While most successful viral videos tend to earn hundreds or even thousands of dollars, the biggest hits — which are rare — can generate more than a million, according to Daniel Fisher, senior vice president of audience solutions at London-based video monetization firm Rightster.

“We have seen, in the last four or five years, an enormous collection of high-definition content being uploaded primarily to YouTube, and now other platforms including Facebook,” says Fisher. Typically, those videos get seen by next to no one. But in rare cases, wildly funny, extremely scary, or just downright amazing videos will start getting shared, and that’s when the viral phenomenon begins. Successful videos get picked up by a thought leader, says Fisher, which is either an Internet personality, celebrity, or other prominent figure. Once someone with lots of social influence shares a video, its reach is accelerated rapidly, and thousands of people start watching and sharing it instantly.

If you’ve monetized your video, this is when the cash starts rolling in. On YouTube, you can monetize your video with the AdSense program, which places ads before, inside, or near your footage. How much your video earns depends on a number of factors, including the types and pricing of ads that run with your clip. Once it’s live, as the view count ticks higher, YouTube tallies the totals and deposits your share of the proceeds into your bank account.

Video ads alone can generate a healthy amount of money. In 2012, The Guardian reported that “Charlie Bit My Finger,” now with more than 800 million views, made more than £100,000 at that point. One blogger says YouTube paid him $5,675 for a video with about 4 million views over six years. And these Quora users have many more first-hand stories about how much money they made with their videos.

But Fisher says you’re more likely to see a payout only in the hundreds for a successful viral video, unless it’s a mega-hit. And keep in mind that the content of a video uploaded to YouTube must not violate anyone else’s copyrights. So if you’re thinking of playing “Chariots of Fire” on that funny movie of your kid’s first steps, be prepared to hear about it from Vangelis.

Another way to make money on viral videos, says Fisher, is to license them — and this is where companies like Rightster help make deals happen. “If your video looks commercially attractive, it will generate attention from production companies and advertising agencies,” he says. These firms may offer you pennies on the dollar to use your video, and can lock you into restrictive contracts. Rightster acts like an agent representing viral video owners’ best interests. It also has extensive contacts and can market your movie to partners that may be interested in featuring your clip. Once a video has reached this stage of popularity, it can make anywhere from $10,000 to hundreds of thousands of dollars.

But if a viral video is popular enough, there’s another way to make big bucks. “Merchandising, merchandising — where the real money from the movie is made,” said Mel Brooks in Spaceballs. Honey Badger the T-shirt. Honey Badger the stuffed animal. Honey Badger the Christmas ornament! ”You essentially turn into a brand with this one piece of content,” says Fisher.

But can those tchotchkes make you rich? “There have been reports of a single piece of content making upwards of a million dollars,” says Fisher, declining to reveal the hauls of any of Rightster’s clients. Are those reports true? The best way to find out is to upload a 15-second clip of your own and find out.

TIME Web

See What the Internet Actually Looks Like

Artists' visualizations show its growth over a decade

The Opte Project, an Internet mapping initiative started in 2003 by computer scientist and artist Barrett Lyon, has released its latest visualization of the ever-growing Internet.

The Internet at its core is a massive global system of interconnected computer networks. What’s mapped in the images above, Lyon explains, are the paths through which information flows from router to router all across the world. Computers from different regions of the world are mapped out by color, allowing viewers to see how regions like Latin America have experienced explosive growth in Internet connectivity.

“What you’re looking at is not a real world. You’re looking at a representation of this different dimension, so to speak,” says Lyon. “The Internet is really big, very connected and extremely complex. It’s this whole world you can’t see. That’s the fun part of visualizing it.”

The Opte Project has been on display in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City and the Museum of Science in Boston.

 

TIME apps

Try These Apps and Sites for Selling Your Old Stuff

messy-closet
Getty Images

Garage sale goes online

Looking to get rid of some old junk? Your unused stuff could be someone else’s treasure.

Depending upon what you’re trying to sell, some services are better than others. We scoured online markets big and small, looking for the best ways to help you unload anything from your fridge to your Fendi bag.

Regardless of the service, selling your old stuff isn’t exactly a get-rich-quick scheme. Well-lit photos that show different angles of an item are key to drawing interest, as are setting fair prices and crafting descriptive titles with keywords buyers are likely to search for.

We considered the following factors while researching services:

  • Ease of use: Is the website or app interface newbie-friendly?
  • Amount of work: From settling on a good starting price, to responding to buyers, to shipping items, some apps make selling stuff online more work than the profit is worth.
  • Fees: Expect to pay at least 10% of an item’s selling price to the marketplace you use – and up to 40% if you use a concierge service that takes care of listing and shipping the items for you.

eBay

Since its launch in 1995, the online-auction kingpin has steadily added features to its marketplace, attracting professional e-sellers and real-world store owners to its original base of regular folks looking to clear out their junk.

A comprehensive selling interface lets you experiment with different selling models – the $1 auction is unbeatable for attracting interest, while setting a specific Buy It Now price can help shift items that the buyer may prefer to get immediately, such as clothing. You can also add in a Best Offer feature if you’re up for some haggling, or put a reserve on auctions so that items won’t sell unless they hit particular prices.

Best for: eBay works for just about everyone, although its listings policy officially rules out “intangible items,” specifically noting that souls can’t be sold. At any given time, there are around 110 million worldwide listings spanning clothing, furniture, antiques, collectibles and more.

Ease of use: While listing an item on the desktop site involves a lengthy form that asks for time-consuming (but not mandatory) details such as the length of a shirt sleeve, posting via the eBay app is much quicker.

How much work do I have to do? Just posting an item for sale is pretty quick when using the app. Snap a few good photos of the item, find a keyword-friendly title, and type up a couple descriptive sentences. If you’ve got a lot for sale, eBay offers features for more experienced sellers, including estimated prices and in-depth analytics for tracking your sales. The flip side is that you can end up spending an inordinate amount of time trying to craft the perfect listing.

If you just want to get rid of your things, the eBay Valet service lets you mail in certain types of items — including like-new designer clothing — for eBay staff to sell. The service commands a fee up to 40% of an item’s selling price. However, eBay is waiving the fees through June 30, 2015. So if want to give the service a try, do it now.

Fees: Your first 20 listings are free to post whether you go for auction or fixed pricing (though upgrading with bigger photos or premium visibility in search results costs extra), after which each listing costs 30 cents. eBay also takes 10% of the final selling price of each item (before shipping costs). If you use PayPal – and eBay makes it a requirement for certain listings – it charges an additional 3% onto that.

eBay is waiving all fees on its eBay Valet service through June 30, 2015.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? There’s a good market for broken electronics, so if you have a smartphone with a busted screen, or a laptop older than your niece, chances are another eBayer will want to strip it for parts.

Overall: Selling on eBay takes the most effort, but can turn the most profit. However, the site has gotten some flack for its seller-unfriendly buyer protection policy, where sellers foot the refunds for items that don’t arrive or are claimed to be significantly different from the description.

Find it here: ebay.com, iTunes, Google Play

Gone

This iOS app sits between sellers and buyers to take care of the entire listing process, including determining the highest selling price based on similar products and sending you boxes with prepaid mailing labels for a UPS pickup. If you live in Austin or San Francisco, you can arrange for a real live person to come over, pack your item, and ship it.

Gone works with online marketplaces including Amazon and eBay, using algorithms that analyze transactions on these sites to determine the highest price for your item before posting it on the most profitable site. Users can track the progress of their items through the app.

Best for: If you prize convenience over profits, Gone works well for selling electronics in good condition.

Ease of use: Getting your stuff into the marketplace is all done via the app. You snap at least two — and up to four — photos or videos of the item to be sold, add a quick description, and upload it to Gone for price appraisal.

How much work do I have to do? Not much. Once you upload items to Gone, you’ll get an estimated earning (minus packing, posting, and other costs), at which point you can either reject or accept the listings. After that, you’ll receive boxes and mailing labels to ship items to the Gone warehouse, where they’ll be inspected then put up for sale within a day. If you allow it to access your email, the app can scrape your inbox for receipts of stuff you bought online in order to automatically populate the items’ description boxes with the pertinent details.

Fees: Convenience comes at a cost: a 32GB iPad Air received an estimate of $235, compared to $317-$370 for Buy It Now listings on eBay. Once your item sells, you receive your earnings as a PayPal transfer or check, minus 7%-15% in fees, depending on the final value sold.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? No. Gone only takes on consumer electronics – think computers, tablets, smartphones, or headphones.

Overall: If you don’t want to go through the laborious process of spit-shining your gadgets, photographing them, and stressing out over how much to sell them for, Gone does it all for you through in an easy to use interface – and charges less in fees than eBay’s similar Valet service.

Find it here: thegoneapp.com, iTunes

OfferUp

If Craigslist is an online version of the classifieds, OfferUp is a tech-savvy version of Craigslist. It sports a gorgeously intuitive, picture-heavy interface for buyers to find anything from appliances and antiques to clothing to electronics in their respective locations.

Like eBay, both buyers and sellers are rated after transactions, and like Airbnb, both can opt for additional validation through real-world ID scanning, as well as linking Facebook and email accounts. The service encourages sellers to stay local with face to face transactions, and avoid shipping items without the buyer seeing them first.

Best for: Just about anything in your home, from heavy appliances to small decorative items.

Ease of use: Modern, fresh-looking Android and iOS apps make it especially easy to stroll around taking pics of all the things you don’t want before uploading each with a keyword-friendly title and short description. Buyers can then browse by neighborhood – which can give you an edge when hawking an old electric kettle that could sell simply because it’s the nearest one to a prospective buyer. Buyers can message you from within the app – a good idea in case of disputes.

How much work do I have to do? It takes about half a minute to post a listing, and you don’t need to bother with shipping. As with Craigslist, for the sake of staying safe when meeting with virtual strangers for the transaction, it’s a good idea to meet buyers in a public location.

Fees: Selling can be more profitable for certain items than other sites, as there are no fees, and you can be paid cash in hand.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? Yes. With thousands of new posts every day – compared to eBay’s hundreds of thousands – there’s less competition for your old stuff, and many neighborhood buyers may pick your everyday junk over someone else’s simply because it saves them gas or shipping fees.

Overall: OfferUp is like a cross between eBay and Craigslist, with no-fuss, in-person transactions, and trust features such as seller ratings and user validation.

Find it here: offerupnow.com, iTunes, Google Play

Vinted

There are dozens of fashion reselling sites out there, but Vinted offers an additional feature: the option to swap items without incurring any fees.

If you prefer to make some cold hard cash, it’s also an easy option for putting stuff up for sale. Where high-fashion-centric sites such as Vestiare Collective require sellers to send in their prospective items for checking before sending on to the buyer – thus lengthening the time before you get paid – Vinted lets sellers and buyers conduct their own exchanges, with seller ratings and the option to follow particular sellers and brands.

Best for: Clothes that are in good condition, from mass market fashion to designer brands, though the bulk of listings seem to be for mainstream fashion.

Ease of use: You can post items for sale via the web and iOS and Android apps by simply uploading a few pictures, inputting the brand, size, and condition of an item, and then writing a short description. If you’re up for a swap, you can add that as an option, allowing other swappers to get in touch for a fee-free exchange.

How much work do I have to do? You’ll have to figure out the best price for your item, buy postage materials, and ship items yourself.

Fees: Listing items is free, but if you sell instead of swap, you’ll incur a 19% fee (which is fairly standard for fashion reselling – similar secondhand clothing sites take 20-40%). However, Vinted hangs on to payments until the buyer confirms they’ve received the order and it’s as described, so you may end up waiting a week for money to be deposited into your account. A nice feature is that if you buy an item on Vinted but don’t like it (and can’t return it), you can relist that item for sale without incurring the fee.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? If you clean, iron, and shoot good pictures of your clothing, you could turn a tidy profit, though that 19% transaction fee can make sales of less expensive items more trouble than they’re worth.

Overall: A low-fuss way to sell mainstream fashion for a teen-to-twentysomething audience.

Find it here: vinted.com, iTunes, Google Play

Tradesy

This sophisticated clothes reselling marketplace focuses on branded fashion, with items displayed in a magazine-esque design that showcases editor’s picks and categories such as “unique and surprising shoes.”

Sellers can compile a personalized homepage or “closet” showing items for sale as well items they’ve liked from other sellers. Users can follow sellers and brands in order to keep track of new items.

Best for: Designer bags and accessories, with somewhat lesser demand for high-end clothing and shoes.

Ease of use: The site and iOS app are streamlined and stylishly designed, with a simple interface for uploading photos, noting brand, size, and color, and setting the price, including a calculator to show what you’ll earn after fees. Listings are active until they sell, without the time limit that some other sites impose.

How much work do I have to do? It’s minimal. You take a few photos of each item (which Tradesy edits and cuts out onto a white background for that pro storefront look), select the brand and category, and either choose Tradesy’s proposed price for the item or set your own. When a sale goes through, you’ll be sent a prepaid, pre-addressed mailing label and box to mail items directly to the buyer.

Fees: Items can sell for anywhere from under a hundred bucks to thousands of dollars. There are no listing fees, but the site charges an 11.9% commission (or 9% if you keep your earnings on Tradesy to spend on-site). Its refund policy is seller-friendly – if a buyer returns your item because it’s the wrong fit or style, you’ll keep all your earnings and Tradesy takes care of the refund.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? Only if it’s branded and in good condition.

Overall: It’s great for selling your pricier items to fashion-savvy shoppers, however Tradesy has a smaller user base than eBay, so you may get fewer interested buyers.

Find it here: tradesy.com, iTunes

Chairish

This beautifully designed site and iOS app focus on the reselling of unique or designer homeware, as well as antiques and jewelry. The site’s homepage shows timely curations of the available products, such as barware in time for Father’s Day, or items from “New Miami Sellers.” A couple hundred new items are posted each day, with the site’s catalog filtered by designers, styles, and cities, so that buyers can hunt down anything art-deco in Chicago, for instance.

Best for: Vintage or antique furniture, house accessories, or jewelry in good condition.

Ease of use: The online form for posting items contains helpful fields for first-time sellers, with options for noting the condition of your item (anywhere from “excellent” to “needs work”), its dimensions, your description of it, and whether you’ll allow local pickup – handy for minimizing the odds of fickle buyers returning items for no good reason.

How much work do you have to do? You’re the one to set an asking price, as well as a minimum price, but if you can’t decide, Chairish can suggest a price that’s likely to help you sell your item quickly. You can’t just list any old item, either: Chairish must approve the listing based on your pictures and whether there’s demand for the item’s particular style. After that, the listing will be live within five working days. If an item doesn’t sell after 30 days, you’ll be encouraged to drop the price.

Fees: There’s a 20% commission fee, and buyers have 48 hours to return shipped goods. Payment isn’t credited to your account until the return period ends. (If a buyer picks up in person, then the return period ends at the time of pickup and you’ll presumably have been paid cash in hand.)

Good for getting rid of old stuff? Not unless it’s quite valuable: there’s a minimum listing price of $75 for each item.

Overall: Good for selling high-value homeware to people who are likely to appreciate it.

Find it here: chairish.com, iTunes

Craigslist

Over 60 million people use Craigslist every month, posting anything from jobs to event listings. The buying and selling of secondhand goods represents a brisk trade on an overflowing marketplace that still looks like a 90s-era message board (the iOS and Android apps are much more polished). It’s often the place to pick up a bargain from people who just want to get rid of their stuff.

Best for: Nearly anything in your house, particularly big things such as appliances and furniture. Smaller items like clothing or accessories are better suited to other sites.

Ease of use: Without the need to fuss around with lengthy posting interfaces or a middleman to give you the thumbs-up on a listing, Craiglist is an extremely easy way to get your stuff out to prospective buyers. As long you write a descriptive title with the keywords a buyer is likely to search for and choose a fair price, you’re likely to be able to move your stuff.

How much work do you have to do? If you’re keen to sell, you’ll have to be on the ball with responding to interested buyers, some of whom may test you with low-ball offers that seem designed to insult. Choosing a fair price may also be tough for some, though you can always note that you’re open to haggling in order to draw more interest.

Fees: There are no fees for listing items for sale. You may have to price your items a little lower than you think, though, as buyers are often expecting a good bargain when they head to Craigslist. But cash in hand coupled with a no-refund policy makes a convincing case for posting here.

Good for getting rid of old stuff? Yes. And if you just want to get rid of stuff, you can list it for free.

Overall: Craigslist is still the juggernaut for getting rid of bulky items, with no listing fees and less businesslike transactions.

Find it here: craigslist.org, iTunes, Google Play

This article originally appeared on Techlicious

More from Techlicious:

TIME Google Doodle

New Google Doodle Honors Monster-Movie Aficionado Eiji Tsubaraya

Google

Tsubaraya passed away in 1970, but his distinctive influence on special effects lives on

Want to know the man behind Japanese monster flicks Godzilla and Ultraman? Tuesday’s Google Doodle celebrates iconic film director Eiji Tsubaraya’s 114th birthday by allowing you to make your own short live action film through an interactive game.

Tsubaraya was one of Japan’s best known special effects directors. Through his monster movies, he coined a style called Tokusatsu, a Japanese form of live action film.

Tsubaraya passed away in 1970, but his distinctive influence on special effects lives on in films like Guillermo del Toro’s Pacific Rim and even the Power Rangers.

Through a series of ten steps, the Google Doodle helps you create a series of scenes for a short Tokusatsu monster film of your own. It includes giant stomping godzillas and even a superhero to fly in and save the day.

TIME Web

Reddit CEO Ellen Pao: ‘We Screwed Up’

Users are furious at what Pao said is a "long history of mistakes"

Reddit Interim CEO Ellen Pao apologized Monday for a “long history of mistakes,” in an apparent response to the hundreds of thousands of the site’s users who have called for her to step down over management decisions.

“We screwed up,” Pao conceded in an announcement posted on Reddit. “We haven’t communicated well, and we have surprised moderators and the community with big changes . . . The mods and the community have lost trust in me and in us, the administrators of reddit.”

Pao came under fire over the weekend when Reddit moderators — who are community volunteers, not company employees — began protesting the unexpected dismissal of Reddit’s director of talent, Victoria Taylor. Moderators said they had relied heavily on Taylor to host mega-popular Ask Me Anythings (AMAs), in which users can pose questions to influential or interesting people. Users and moderators speculate Taylor’s dismissal was related to a chaotic AMA she hosted with Rev. Jesse Jackson, though Reddit has denied the claim. (Reddit has not given a reason for Taylor’s dismissal.)

Outraged users also flocked to a Change.org petition demanding Pao’s resignation as CEO, which as of Monday afternoon had over 180,000 signatures. The petition, which was posted weeks before Taylor’s dismissal, accuses Pao of censorship and driving the website’s traffic into the ground. It also references Pao’s unsuccessful, high-profile gender discrimination lawsuit against her former employer, which denied Pao’s allegations and claimed Pao is “a manipulative individual who will sue her way to the top.”

In her apology, Pao outlined “three concrete steps” for Reddit’s future: to improve and build new web tools that complement moderators’ work, to improve administrative communication with moderators, and to allow moderators to default to the old version of search.

“I mean it when I say we screwed up, and we want to have a meaningful ongoing discussion,” Pao wrote. “I and the team are committed to talking more often with the community, starting now.”

Pao, formerly a junior partner at high-profile venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins, joined Reddit in 2013. She became interim CEO late last year.

TIME Web

Reddit Moderators Lash Out After Employee’s Unexpected Dismissal

Some of the site's most popular pages were shut down

Reddit moderators shut down hundreds of the online bulletin board’s most popular pages on Friday in response to an employee’s unexpected dismissal.

Members of the online community became outraged after Victoria Taylor, Reddit’s director of talent and chief facilitator of the popular Ask Me Anything pages (AMAs), was dismissed on Thursday without an explanation, the New York Times reports. Moderators say Taylor’s dismissal will prevent them from coordinating AMAs, as Taylor was the main point of contact for celebrities, politicians and other public figures who participated in the online Q&A sessions.

Reddit users speculated Taylor’s dismissal is connected with her moderation of Rev. Jesse Jackson’s AMA on Wednesday, which soon became disorganized after a flurry of questions about racial issues and his personal history.

[NYT]

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com