TIME weather

Southern Snowstorm Knocks Out Power, Wipes Out Flights

Breck Gorman
Steve Helber—AP Breck Gorman clears his driveway with a blower during a snowstorm in Richmond, Va. on Feb. 26, 2015.

The storm left a trail of travel headaches, school closings and power outages

A swift-moving storm that dumped as much as 10 inches of snow and slush across the Deep South on Wednesday brought a wintry blast to the Mid-Atlantic on Thursday. Washington, D.C., and its suburbs were hit with 1 to 3 inches of snow before the storm tapered off after 10 a.m., The Weather Channel reported. It will remain too far offshore to bring significant snowfall to New York or hard-hit Boston.

The storm left a trail of travel headaches, school closings and power outages. More than 156,000 homes and businesses in North Carolina were without power, along with 4,000 in Virginia, 13,000 in Alabama and 2,400 in Georgia…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME weather

Snow and Storms to Batter the South

Winter storm hits metro Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Branden Camp—EPA A vehicle drives in the snow on Interstate 575 in Acworth, Ga. on Feb. 25, 2015.

And parts of the Midwest

A winter storm will bring rain and snow to much of the South on Wednesday night, stretching from North Texas to the Carolinas.

Atlanta, Nashville and Charlotte can all expect freezing rain and sleet. The Gulf Coast, meanwhile, will suffer through heavy rain and thunderstorms, according to Weather.com.

The midwest will also get rain and snow, from Springfield, Ill., to Pittsburgh. That storm will eventually merge with the one moving up from the South.

[Weather.com]

TIME weather

Snowstorm to Snarl South From Texas to Virginia

A man rides his bicycle across the railroad tracks in Exmore, Va. as snow falls, Feb. 24, 2015.
Jay Diem—AP A man rides his bicycle across the railroad tracks in Exmore, Va. as snow falls, Feb. 24, 2015.

Some areas bracing for eight inches of snow

At least 20 million Americans were in the path of a deadly winter storm Wednesday that was expected to dump snow from northern Texas to southern Virginia and threatened to snarl commutes in cities including Dallas and Atlanta.

School closures were ordered and states of emergency were declared in Georgia and Alabama — the latest impact of an Arctic chill that has set records across much of the nation.

Between three and five inches of snow was likely across the southern Plains and the South, forecasters said. Some areas — including northern North Carolina and northern Georgia — were bracing for up to eight inches…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME viral

Listen to Ed Sheeran Adorably Read the Weather Report

"You will need some lip balm because your lips will dry"

In the UK, the weather is cloudy with a chance of ginger.

Singer Ed Sheeran co-hosted Nick Grimshaw’s Radio 1 show Tuesday morning when his BFF (but not gf) Taylor Swift came on as a guest. And his crowning moment came when the singer got to read the weather report, fulfilling an Ed Sheeran weatherman fantasy we never knew we had.

“The weather outside is brisk — if you walk out you will get very, very pink cheeks, um, very quickly,” Ed Sheeran said, hopefully while blushing.

He continued, “You will need some lip balm because your lips will dry, and that will happen. Also there is a chance that you will step in a puddle today so please do not wear slippers outside.”

Ed, where were you during the polar vortex? You would have made things so much more pleasant!

 

 

TIME weather

Expect More Bad Weather in the Southern U.S. and Rockies on Monday

An Oklahoma Department of Transportation sand truck rest on it's top in the median of US 412 west of Enid, Okla. Sunday, after it was involved in an accident with another vehicle on Feb. 22, 2015
Billy Hefton—AP An Oklahoma Department of Transportation sand truck rest on it's top in the median of US 412 west of Enid, Okla. Sunday, after it was involved in an accident with another vehicle on Feb. 22, 2015

Motorists should prepare for hazardous travel conditions

The Rocky Mountains and Southern Plains are in for snowy and icy conditions Monday as a winter storm continues to move across the region.

Multiple accidents have already been attributed to the storm, with injuries being reported in Utah and Kansas, according to the Weather Channel. Motorists should continue to take utmost caution.

Those planning on catching a flight may want to double-check the status of their bookings. Dallas–Fort Worth International Airport canceled about half of the flights scheduled for Monday after already grounding around 160 flights on Sunday. Denver International canceled more than 330 flights over weekend, according to Denver’s Channel 7 News.

Meanwhile, schools in Texas, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Louisiana, New Mexico and Alabama have announced cancellations or delays of classes due to weather concerns.

Read next: 7 Reasons to Love This Freezing Weather

TIME weather

See a Bird’s Eye View of the Frozen Tundra That Is New York City

It's very cold in New York this weekend. How cold? Check out these aerial images of a frosty Hudson River and more.

TIME weather

Stranded Drivers Ditch Cars on Icy Highways in the South as Cold Snap Continues

Dozens of drivers reported having to sleep in their cars or abandon their vehicles altogether

A cold spell carrying ice, snow and heavy winds that has already claimed more than two dozen lives and snarled traffic across the eastern U.S. was preparing to deliver a second blow Saturday—and it likely won’t let up until the end of next week, meteorologists warned.

Several states in the South, stretching from Arkansas to Georgia and up to Kentucky, were expected to get pelted with rain Saturday, after ice accumulations took down power lines and halted travel on some highways Friday.

Dozens of drivers reported having to sleep in their cars or abandon their vehicles altogether because of ice-caused accidents…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME weather

Watch a Man Go Swimming in a Pool Full of Snow (Wearing Nothing But a Speedo)

Subzero temperatures? No problem

If you haven’t noticed from all the screenshots of weather apps posted on your Facebook and Instagram feeds—or from, you know, stepping outside—it’s been cold outside. Really, really, dreadfully cold. Especially in Boston, where wind chills have made it feel like -15°F.

But bitter cold and strong winds didn’t stop former LSU swimmer Julius Gloeckner from going for a dip. He decided to don his Speedo, swim cap and googles and dive right into the huge snowdrift currently filling his backyard pool.

Watch as he expertly performs several different strokes, but maybe grab a blanket first, because you’ll feel extra cold just watching.

(h/t Daily Dot)

TIME weather

Deadly East Coast Freeze Paves Way for Storms and Snow

Historic lows in the East will make way for another round of winter storms on Saturday

Bitter cold gripped the eastern United States from Michigan to Florida on Friday, causing at least 24 fatalities ahead of a weekend forecast to bring more winter storms to regions still digging out of the snow.

Cities including Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and Lexington, Ky., had their coldest morning on Friday in two decades, while the mercury in Flint, Mich. dropped to 25 degrees below-zero. Chicago registered its coldest temperature ever at -8 degrees Fahrenheit at O’Hare airport. As far south as normally sultry Orlando, temperatures hit 33 degrees, tying a previous 1958 record, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

Overall, at least 500 daily record lows have been broken since Sunday, Weather.com reports, with more expected Saturday morning in the Northeast.

The freeze has so far caused at least two dozen deaths across the country, mostly as a result of hypothermia or car accidents on icy roads, NBC reports. Seventeen of the deaths occurred in Tennessee, at least eight due to hypothermia. At least six people in Pennsylvania have died of hypothermia.

“This week ranks among the most intense arctic outbreaks so far in the 21st century for the eastern U.S., and it is certainly one of the most impressively cold air masses we’ve seen this late in the winter season, coming only a month before the spring equinox,” said Weather.com senior meteorologist Nick Wiltgen.

More frigid cold is expected across the region on Saturday, with sleet and freezing rain expected Friday night in Arkansas, and in Tennessee and Kentucky on Saturday. Three to six inches of snow will fall in Pennsylvania, New York and New England, and a foot or more is expected in parts of West Virginia and Virginia.

On Friday, temperatures Lynchburg, Va. dropped to -11 degrees, to -17 in Cleveland, and Washington D.C., hit 5 degrees. The acute cold is the result of an Arctic airmass plunging south from Canada, according to the National Weather Service.

TIME weather

7 Reasons to Love This Freezing Weather

Because there's always a bright side

It was 1º F in New York City on Friday—one frigging degree. That’s a keep-the-penny, why-bother, rounding error on the Fahrenheit scale. Convert it to Centigrade and it gets even worse, a brisk -17.22º, which may help explain why America never went metric.

But cold weather isn’t so bad. OK, it is, but here are seven things to like about the current deep freeze:

Less crime!

Criminals may be fools but they’re not stupid. If you’re going to heist a flat-screen TV or knock over a convenience store, would you rather do it when it’s 7oº and clear or when it’s 12-below and the wind chill factor is freezing your eyeballs? Crime historically drops during winter, and when it’s a brutal winter, things get even more peaceful. New York just earned applause after setting an all-time record for consecutive days without a homicide—at 12. (We do get graded on a curve.) Boston—which is just one woolly mammoth away from the next Ice Age—saw a 32% drop in larcenies, 35% in burglaries and 70% in homicides from Jan. 1 to Feb. 8, compared to the same period last year. But cold weather can increase auto thefts, thanks to what are known as puffers, cars left running in driveways while owners wait inside for them to warm up.

More sex!

Maybe it’s the cuddling under blankets, or the body heat generated when you’re active, or the belief that one more day of this flipping cold and you’re going to die so you and your squeeze might as well go out happy. But whatever it is, when things freeze, humans steam. Last summer, the Pittsburgh area saw a spike in s0-called “polar vortex babies,” with increases in births of 27.8% and 15.9% at two area hospitals compared to the same period a year earlier, following a bitter stretch that occurred nine months earlier. Cold weather amorousness may also be attributable to the mere fact that it gets dark earlier in the winter—putting people in mind of nighttime activities—or that bundling up in the winter means we see less skin during the day so even a glimpse of a partner’s elbow or ankle might be enough to light the engines.

Lose Weight!

Snowmen may never be anything but round, but the rest of us can slim down naturally in cold weather. That’s mostly because of the simple business of shivering. The whole purpose of shivering is to keep you moving, which generates heat—and uses calories. The very good news is, it doesn’t even take active shivering to burn at least some fat. A phenomenon called non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) may raise your thermostat and lower your weight when it’s as warm as 64º F (17.8º C). Caveat: NST helps only so much. Waiting out winter by huddling under a blanket, binge-watching TV and hoovering up Doritos is still going to have the expected effect.

Fewer bugs!

Nothing like the buzz of flies, the bite of mosquitos and the sting of bees to make summer the idyll it is—not. One of the few advantages of winter is that it’s murder on insects. All of them make provisions before the freeze hits, of course—either burrowing underground and hunkering down until spring or leaving behind a fresh clutch of eggs that can turn into a fresh swarm of bugs next summer. But if the thermometer drops far enough, those eggs may be finished too. The gypsy moth, the emerald ash borer and the pests that feed on honey locust trees all leave fewer heirs when the thermometer falls below zero. That means an easier season for the trees, and far fewer things for you to swat with a rolled up newspaper.

Live longer!

Alright, this one might be a stretch. Studies have absolutely, positively shown that colder temperatures activate genes that increase longevity—provided you’re a worm. Which you’re probably not. But another study shows that reducing core body temperature can increase lifespans by as much as 20%—provided you’re a mouse. Or a mussel. Still, it’s breakthroughs in animal studies that often lead to breakthroughs in human studies, so there’s reason to hope. Meantime, go mussels!

Feel no pain!

Or at least feel less. All that stuff you hear about cold weather making arthritis and other joint pain worse is true enough. But in at least one study in Finland, a plunge into icy water was found to increase norepinephrine levels in the blood as much as two- or three-fold. One of the many jobs neuropinephrine does is reduce overall pain. That’s a good thing. But plunging into icy water to get that effect? Not so much. So this one too may need a little work.

Fewer wars!

Napoleon didn’t leave a whole lot of valuable lessons behind. But one thing history’s bad boy did teach us was that on the list of truly bad ideas, attacking Russia in the winter ranks pretty much No. 1. It’s not just that wars bog down in cold weather, it’s that we tend to be less moved to fight them. Part of this is the same phenomenon that keeps crime down in the cold. Part is something much newer that was revealed in a 2011 study, which showed that higher temperatures have historically meant higher levels of armed conflict. The Cold War, it turns out, may have been an oxymoron.

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com