TIME Marriage

Are You ‘Monogamish’? A New Survey Says Lots of Couples Are

Guy D'Alema/USA Network

Having kids makes people want to stray and social networks help them

Perhaps because the premise of its new original drama series about a cheating married couple, Satisfaction, is not depressing enough for couples, the USA Network conducted a survey on cheating and marital satisfaction among Gen X and Y.

Some of the survey’s findings are not surprising. The arrival of children and the subsequent triangulation of the relationship and lack of bandwidth, time, money and energy makes a couple far more susceptible to the desire to stray. And the rise of the social networks make such straying much easier: easier to start, easier to arrange and easier to hide. (It may make it a little harder to end quietly though, especially if one of the parties feels aggrieved.)

Some other findings are a little more unexpected, however. For the vast majority of folks 18 to 49 years old, at least in Austin, Omaha, Nashville and Phoenix, where this study took place, cheating is an absolute dealbreaker. A full 94% of respondents would rather never marry than end up with a person they knew would cheat and 82% of them have “zero tolerance” for infidelity. Yet 81% of people admitted they’d cheat if they knew there wouldn’t be any consequences and 42% of the survey takers, in equal parts men and women, admitted to already having cheated.

If people must seek out some strange, the participants in USA’s survey suggest they really take it elsewhere; 81% believe it’s better to cheat with a stranger than a friend.

Why would it ever be O.K. to betray a spouse? More than half of the respondents (54%) believe cheating could be justified, particularly if the other party had already cheated first. Presumably, many of those were also in the group that already cheated.

The idea that monogamy “is a social expectation but not a biological reality,” as the survey put it, was true for more than half of all the Gen X and Y respondents. (The survey apparently didn’t ask if it was neither of those, but a learned skill, like, say, reading, gymnastics or coding.) But somewhat surprisingly, only one in five men preferred the idea of what could be called a “monogamish” relationship—where people are mostly faithful—over a monogamous one.

In other findings, the study—which, as an opt-in internet survey of only 1000 people has not been peer reviewed, lacks rigor and should not be used to make life decisions—also uncovered these nuggets:

*More than 40% of men 25 to 34 have discussed having a three way with their significant other. (No details, alas, on how these suggestions were received…)

*Almost three quarters of the GenX and Ys questioned think a few more hoops to jump through before people get married wouldn’t hurt, including living together for at least a year beforehand (35%), being required to finish high school (24%) and genetic testing if the couple wants kids (9%).

*Should that not prove to be enough, that’s O.K. More than half of the survey participants think a marriage that doesn’t have to last forever to be considered successful.

*And finally, in a sign that no celebrity behavior goes unnoticed, the Paltrow Martin style of split is getting some traction: a third of the survey takers say they’d rather “uncouple” than divorce.

TIME TV

New Gotham Trailer Shows Catwoman and the Riddler

The trailer reveals some tantalizing details about the show

A new trailer released Tuesday for Fox’s upcoming TV series Gotham reveals some tantalizing details about the show set in the Batman universe.

The series, which will not star Batman, centers around Commissioner Gordon as a young detective in Gotham City, the gritty, crime-infested metropolis he left some unspecified amount of time in the past. The trailer, titled “The God. The Evil. The Beginning.” shows Gordon, who has just returned to Gotham, walking toward a crime scene. He passes the likes of the Catwoman—not a pleather clad super-villain but just a mysterious lady holding a cat—and The Riddler—sans makeup.

TIME

Learn How to do Porky Pig’s Voice in 30 Seconds

That's all folks!

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Most people who parked in front of Looney Tunes have tried (and probably failed) nailing Porky Pig’s iconic stutter. To help fans out, Looney Tunes voice actor Bob Bergen broke down Porky’s trademark line — made famous by deceased man of 1,000 voices Mel Blanc — in 30 seconds while filming the documentary I Know That Voice.

(h/t: Neatorama)

TIME Television

Missing Your Favorite TV Shows This Summer? Here’s What to Watch Instead

Find the perfect off-season replacement (and learn how long it'll take to watch it)

For regular people, summertime is a happy time: full of sunshine and warmth and good feeling. But for diehard TV fans, the summer can get pretty bleak: all your favorite shows are off the air, and you start to feel like you’re just sitting around wondering why all the meaning has been sucked out of your life. Sure, you could go outside and get some fresh air, or even read a book or two — but that’s silly. Instead, you should spend this summer binge-watching shows that are similar to your favorites from the past year.

With that in mind, we’ve put together a guide to help satisfy your TV needs and tide you over until your shows come back on the air. Plan your binge-watching schedules accordingly.

  • If you’re missing House of Cards, watch 24.

    24: Live Another Day
    Greg Williams—Fox

    All the scandal and intrigue and twists — but at a faster pace. Instead of watching Frank Underwood slowly plan out his careful schemes, you’ll watch Jack Bauer taking on terrorists head-on.

    Time commitment: High. With just over 200 episodes, fully committing to 24 is no small task.

    Where to watch: iTunes, Netflix (DVD only)

  • If you’re missing Parks and Recreation, watch Brooklyn Nine-Nine.

    Brooklyn Nine-Nine
    Patrick Eccelsine—FOX

    Brooklyn Nine-Nine was created by Michael Schur and Dan Goor, both of whom worked extensively on Parks and Rec. The parallels are clear: a workplace comedy featuring an ensemble cast full of wacky weirdos; shenanigans ensue. But Brooklyn Nine-Nine is still finding its footing, and is likely to continue developing a distinct identity.

    Time commitment: Low. Just one season! (This one season was enough to earn the series the Golden Globe for Best Comedy Series.)

    Where to watch: Hulu Plus

  • If you’re missing Bob’s Burgers, watch Home Movies.

    Home Movies
    Cartoon Network

    Like Bob’s Burgers, this show was the brainchild of animator and voice actor Loren Bouchard. You’ll notice some direct parallels — some of the characters are voiced by the same actors, for example — but you’ll come to appreciate both shows for their distinct sets of quirks.

    Time commitment: Medium. There are four seasons’ worth of episodes, but you’ll still enjoy the show if you pick and choose random episodes.

    Where to watch: YouTube, Adultswim.com, Netflix (DVD only)

  • If you’re missing Orange Is the New Black, watch Weeds.

    Weeds
    Showtime

    Both shows come from creator Jenji Kohan and center on wealthy, white female leads who commit crimes. Otherwise, though, there are plenty of difference in the shows’ humor, characters and plot lines. And if you already watched Weeds when it aired, it’s especially interesting to go back and compare it to Orange.

    Time commitment: High. Eight seasons, with just over 100 episodes. But you can do it. We have faith in you.

    Where to watch: Netflix

  • If you’re missing Mad Men, watch Masters of Sex.

    Masters of Sex
    Showtime

    They’re both period dramas that take place in the mid-20th century, so they’ve got a similar retro vibe. And as TIME pointed out when Masters of Sex wrapped up its first season, the show often plays out like a more feminism-minded Mad Men. So you get the mid-century hairstyles and costumes you crave, plus a tad more gender equality — and also, more nudity!

    Time commitment: Low. If you catch up on the first season quickly, you’ll be able to watch the second season — which just premiered on July 13 — in real time.

    Where to watch: iTunes, Showtime

TIME Diet/Nutrition

Boring TV Shows Make You Eat 52% More

Man watching TV bored and eating
Notorious91—Getty Images

Need another reason to kick back with a jaw-dropping episode of Orange Is the New Black? Didn’t think so—but here’s one anyway. A new study suggests there may be benefits for women who choose riveting TV programs over snoozers: We seem to eat less during the nail-biters.

That’s the conclusion of a group of researchers at Sweden’s Uppsala University, who studied 18 women while they snacked and watched different types of TV programming: an “engaging” episode of a popular Swedish comedy show and a “boring” televised art lecture. As a control, the researchers also monitored grazing during another “non-engaging” activity: reading a text on insects living in Sweden (seriously, we couldn’t make that last part up).

The results showed that boring content increased snacking by a surprisingly weighty margin. While watching boring TV, women consumed 52% more food than during the engaging comedy. This trend held up across different media, too: Subjects ate 35% less while watching engaging TV than while reading about insects. (Work On Your trouble spots during commercial breaks with this couch potato workout plan.)

The study authors conclude that it’s the level of excitement in our TV shows that may determine the amount we chow—not the act of watching (or reading) itself.

“At very low levels of engagement, you kind of eat to engage yourself because you’re bored,” says Aner Tal, a research associate at Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab, an organization devoted to the study of how and why we eat the way we do. “It might also have to do with the pacing,” he suggests. A rapid-fire story, for example, could speed your rate of eating.

Of course, whether it’s a sleepy Sunday Antiques Roadshow marathon or an edge-of-your-seat Game of Thrones binge, watching TV is still a setup for overdoing it on the munchies. Your healthiest bet is to snack smarter while couch-bound. “Use pre-portioned snacks as opposed to endless bowls,” advises Tal. That means keeping the source of food out of sight, too. “If you know you have a tendency to overeat while watching TV,” he adds, “just snack on something that’s better for you. Have veggies as a snack instead of chips.” And maybe a side of excitement or action, too—anything but art lectures and insects.

MORE: 15 Terrible Snacks For Weight Loss

This article was written by Caroline Praderio and originally appeared on Prevention.com.

TIME Research

Teens Are Spending a Ton of Time In Front of Screens, CDC Says

The majority of young people spend a lot of time in front of the TV or computer

A recent report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows 98.5% of young people between ages 12–15 report watching TV daily, and 91.1% report using a computer every day outside of school. And the vast majority of them were getting more than two hours a day of screen time, which is the upper limit recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Girls were slightly more likely to follow that guideline than boys.

The study also found that obese and overweight kids were more likely to have more screen time.

Spending excessive time using a computer and watching TV has been linked to higher blood pressure, higher cholesterol, and being overweight or obese. We also know how bad sitting is for your health, and most screen time happens in people who aren’t moving around. That’s why adolescent groups recommend a two-hour cap. You can see the data break-down below.

Percentage of youth aged 12–15 reporting 2 hours or less of TV viewing and computer use daily, by sex: United States, 2012

SOURCES: CDC/NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey, 2012. CDC National Center for Health Statistics

Percentage of youth aged 12–15 reporting 2 hours or less of TV viewing and computer use daily, by weight status: United States, 2012

SOURCES: CDC/NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey, 2012. CDC National Center for Health Statistics
TIME celebrities

After Pregnancy Tweet, Lea Michele’s Publicist Says Her Twitter Account Hacked

Watch What Happens Live - Season 11
Lea Michele Bravo—NBCU Photo Bank/Getty Images

Lea Michele on Friday became the second Glee star to have her Twitter account hacked in as many days.

“Before this gets out to the media, I would like to announce to my fans that I am pregnant #BabyBoy,” read a message posted on her Twitter account. But Michele was hacked, the 27-year-old’s publicist confirmed to TIME. The publicist, however, did not touch upon the pregnancy question.

Michele’s tweet was met with skepticism by many after another Glee star, Chris Colfer, appeared on Thursday to tweet that he had been fired from the popular FOX show. But the show’s producers also said that Colfer was a hacking victim.

“We’ve been alerted that Chris Colfer’s Twitter account has been hacked,” read a statement to TIME from 20th Century Fox Television. “Rumors of his dismissal from Glee could not be further from the truth. We love Chris and look forward to working with him again this season.”

 

TIME Television

The Full House Crew Reunited for Dave Coulier’s Wedding

Cast members reunited at the Montana ceremony

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Actor Dave Coulier’s Wednesday wedding doubled as a reunion for the classic ABC sitcom Full House.

Show creator Jeff Franklin and cast members John Stamos, Candace Cameron Bure, Andrea Barber and Bob Saget all traveled to Paradise Valley, Montana to see “Uncle Joey” tie the knot with photographer and producer Melissa Bring on Wednesday. Bure, who played DJ Tanner in the 80′s and 90′s sitcom, and Barber, who played Kimmy Gibbler, previously told Us Weekly they would be each other’s dates at the wedding—both their husbands stayed at home to watch the kids.

Full House, which aired on ABC from 1987 until 1995, followed the life of Danny Tanner (Saget), a widowed father who asks his best friend Joey Gladstone (Coulier) and brother-in-law Jesse Katsopolis (Stamos) to help him raise his three daughters after his wife’s death. Only the oldest Tanner daughter, Bure, attended the “reunion,” as Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen—who played the younger daughters—were not at the wedding.

The cast members who did attend, though, made sure to chronicle their adventures on social media. Franklin tweeted his feelings after he gathered the show’s leading men for a photo:

Barber and Bure—”partners in crime” as Bure calls them in this Instagram snap, which she posted today in honor of Barber’s birthday—clearly had fun in Montana.

So did Stamos, captured here by Saget while walking with a bench.

TIME Internet

Community Gets a 6th Season, and the Cast Rejoices on Twitter

Community - Season 5
NBC / Getty Images

#SixSeasonsAndAMovie could finally become a reality

The past few years have been quite the emotional roller coaster ride for fans of Community, the cult favorite sitcom that follows a group of oddballs at fictional Greendale Community College. After a cancellation at NBC and an almost-resurrection at Hulu, the show is returning for a sixth season after all — on Yahoo, oddly enough.

Fans, of course, are thrilled, as this means they might actually get to see the #SixSeasonsAndAMovie that Community has been promising. Community cast members are pretty excited about the news, too, and many of them took to Twitter to express their delight. Some of the tweets are a bit, er, eccentric (we’re looking at you, Dan Harmon, fearless Community creator) but the sentiment is clear.

Absent from these reactions are Donald Glover and Chevy Chase, who will not be returning to the cast, but otherwise, the rest of the Greendale crew will soon be together again.

But really, Danny Pudi, who plays the show’s pop-culture obsessed Abed, summed up everybody’s feelings:

 

TIME TV

How to Roll Your Own Aereo (Spoiler: It’s Not Cheap)

Supreme Court Hears Case Pinning Startup Internet TV Company Aereo Against Major Broadcast Networks
Andrew Burton—Getty Images

Over at Zatz Not Funny!, Dave Zatz addresses the Aereo-sized elephant in the room: How do you replace Aereo now that it’s gone?

The secret to Aereo’s short-lived success was that you didn’t need to buy hardware to use it. You “rented” an antenna stored at one of Aereo’s facilities somewhere, and the company retransmitted the signal over the Internet to you, either in real time or you could remotely record shows to be transmitted later. The most expensive Aereo plan topped out at $12 a month.

So the spoiler, in case you missed it in the headline: rolling your own Aereo-like setup won’t exactly be cheap. It’s okay. You can click away to something else now. I understand.

If you’re still here, we’ll assume that you want some sort of solution that’ll not only let you record TV, but let you stream live TV to yourself on an array of devices. If you just want to use cord-cutting services — you don’t care about live TV, in other words — check out this post for some services to try. We’re also assuming you get a strong over-the-air signal where you live. You can bet Aereo’s antennae were nicely positioned to catch strong signals; the signals to my place in Boston, for instance, are weaker than a toddler trying to lift a car.

Newer TiVo + Add-on Streaming Box

TiVo wants your business, to be sure, though Zatz figures “cord cutters will need to front about $300 in hardware and $15/month to approximate Aereo.” That’s for a base-model TiVo Roamio box ($200 MSRP) — the only version to sport over-the-air antenna connections — and monthly service. You’ll also need to add TiVo’s streaming box ($130 MSRP), which only streams over a Wi-Fi connection and doesn’t yet sport an Android app.

Older TiVo + Slingbox

If you really want to stream it all, your best bet, according to Zatz, is a used TiVo Premiere box with lifetime service attached to it. That means trying your luck on eBay, basically (they seem to be going for north of $200). That’ll let you use an over-the-air antenna to record shows on the major networks for later. Then, for transmitting live and recorded TV over the Internet to yourself, Zatz says the Slingbox is “still the best game in town.” That means another $180 to $300 in hardware costs, plus paying extra for the Slingplayer mobile apps.

Tablo TV

Zatz also calls Tablo TV “One part Slingbox, one part DVR. Like rolling your own Aereo with a better UI and higher video quality, without those pesky regional restrictions.” The hardware runs between $219 and $289, with lifetime service running another $150 (you can pay $5 a month or $50 a year, too). You also need to supply your own hard drive, which could run a hundred bucks or more if you want to be able to store a lot of video.

No You Don’t Replace Aereo, Silly Rabbit [Zatz Not Funny!]

 

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