MONEY groceries

Eggs Aren’t The Only Thing That Just Got More Expensive

French fries and Egg McMuffins, we're looking at you.

More than half of American consumers say they are concerned about the bird flu outbreak, according to an NPD Group survey. And yes, there’s ample reason to fret: The virus has killed nearly 40 million birds, including 32 million hens, or about 10% of the nation’s egg producers. Understandably, egg prices have spiked as a consequence. The incredible edible egg isn’t the only everyday purchase that is getting more expensive for consumers lately. The price tags on these items are also going up.

  • Eggs

    Eggs produced from cage-free hens on sale in a supermarket in New York on Saturday, January 3, 2015. The recent outbreak of Avian Flu which impacted 10% of the egg-laying chickens has cut into the supply of eggs.
    Richard B. Levine—Newscom

    The bird flu outbreak has been wreaking havoc in the Midwest, with some 40 million turkeys and chicken exposed to the virus. Roughly 25 million chickens have been lost just in Iowa, the nation’s leading egg producer. One result is that wholesale and retail egg prices have soared. The wholesale price of “breaker” eggs purchased in bulk by fast food chains and baking manufacturers has nearly tripled in the past month, while the price of a dozen large eggs rose 58% in one month’s time in the Midwest.

    If the problem persists, it’s expected it won’t be long for baking companies and fast food outlets like McDonald’s to raise prices on products with eggs as primary ingredients. In other words, your Egg McMuffin could be getting a price hike soon.

  • Rental Cars

    Airport car rental offices at the Long Beach California Airport
    Daniel Dillon—Alamy

    It’s usually hard to tell when and by how much rental car companies increase prices because there are so many factors involved: Rates are determined by demand, location, how far in advance a traveler books, and so on. But recently Hertz, which also owns brands Dollar and Thrifty, publicly announced that as of mid-June it was raising rates $5 per day and $20 per week on rentals at airport locations, with $3 and $10 hikes, respectively, at off-airport rental lots.

    A quick 5% spike in Hertz’s stock price indicates that investors liked the move. That could be one reason why Hertz jacked up prices openly rather than stealthily. It also seems like Hertz is trying to push rates northward across the board in the industry, in the same way that all airlines tend to match the fare increases of any competitor. “Rent-a-car companies are normally very discreet about raising prices,” Mike Millman, who covers travel companies for Millman Research, told the New York Post. “What’s so unusual about this is Hertz is publicly declaring it wants to lead the industry up.”

  • Deep-Fried Foods

    French Fries coming out of fryer
    Saul Loeb—AFP/Getty Images

    A prolonged dry spell in Canada’s prairies has meant big trouble for the crops used to make of one of the region’s prime products, canola oil. As Bloomberg News reported, the vegetable oil is necessary for McDonald’s, Taco Bell, KFC, and Frito-Lay to make so many of the deep-fried treats we crave while knowing they’re probably terrible for our health. Prices have jumped 18% since September, and it’s expected the increase will trickle onward to price hikes for potato chips, French fries, KFC chicken, and other deep-fried delicacies.

  • Turkey

    Shady Brook Farms brand Turkeys for sale in a supermarket refrigerator in New York
    Richard Levine—Alamy

    While the bird flu outbreak has primarily affected chickens, it has impacted turkey populations as well—and turkey prices. Wholesale prices are up 4.5% compared with a year ago, corresponding to 10% price increases for turkey breast meat at supermarket deli counters.

    The real fear is that the avian flu virus causes a ripple effect in America’s turkey population, potentially translating to shortages and price spikes for Thanksgiving, when the demand for turkey naturally reaches a yearlong high. For now at least, suppliers are maintaining that there will be more than plenty of turkeys available come Thanksgiving. Regardless, we’re predicting that there will be reports causing panic among turkey lovers in the months to come, as they seem to appear every autumn.

  • Gas

    Gas station attendant pumping gas in Andover, Mass., May 8, 2015.
    Elise Amendola—AP

    Just in time for the summer travel season, gas prices are rising. As of Friday, the national average for a gallon of regular was $2.74, representing a rise of roughly 25¢ over the last month. Gas prices have remained particularly pricey on the West Coast, with drivers in Los Angeles seeing $4 per gallon at the pump. With California prices that have stayed stubbornly high compared to the rest of the country, some consumer advocates have accused the oil companies of gouging drivers.

    At the same time, it must be noted that gas is significantly less expensive compared with the same time last year, when the national average was $3.65. Cheap gas is one of the big reasons huge crowds—and epic traffic—are expected on the roads over Memorial Day weekend.

TIME Aviation

This Is Who Decides If Your Flight Takes Off This Memorial Day Weekend

Meet the Cancellator

Summer travel is kicking off this Memorial Day weekend, and major airports around the county are preparing for roughly 3 million Americans who’ll board a flight. Not all of the travelers, of course, will make it to their destinations on time—some will be part of the unlucky bunch whose flights become cancelled or delayed.

The job of determining who will be on time and who won’t falls upon a small group of airport employees who make inputs into a computer program they call the Cancellator. Their goal is to preserve an airline’s original schedule as much as possible. And that’s no easy task—each time one flight is delayed or canceled, other flights using that plane become affected, too.

Want to know more about the software and employees behind your airport frustrations? Read TIME’s March 3, 2014 cover story on airline cancellations here.

TIME Research

This Is Why Long Commutes Can Actually Be Good for Your Mood

The 605 freeway is jammed with cars on a day when the mountains are visible in the distance, on November 5, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.
Melanie Stetson Freeman—AP The 605 freeway is jammed with cars on a day when the mountains are visible in the distance, on November 5, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.

Some people get wound up but others relish the space to think

While saddling people with a long commute is quite likely to put them in a cantankerous mood, a new study out of Australia has also found that some people actually look forward to their daily transit because it provides a bit of much-craved alone time.

Additionally, commuting can be a positive social experience; even though people generally don’t talk with each other, subtle body cues like smiles, frowns and glances help people feel more connected.

“Public transport can be an especially valuable space for being with other people. It can help prevent social isolation,” project author Dr. David Bissell told Australia National University.

But there is a flip side.

Long hours commuting can also cause distrust and depression, even altering how people interact with friends, family and colleagues, says the study.

A key takeaway from Bissell’s research is that stressful commutes directly, and negatively, impact people’s lives. The study cites examples like “tipping points where people change their route or mode of travel, or even move house.”

For the study, Dr. Bissell interviewed 53 commuters for whom commuting was a significant part of their life. He also interviewed 26 “stakeholders” like policymakers and transport advocates. He then went through two “week in the life” experiments in Australia.

“Hopefully it will be a bit of a wakeup call to employers in terms of managing this situation,” he said.

TIME Transportation

Elon Musk’s Craziest Project Is Coming Closer to Reality

2013 Bloomberg

A deal was finalized this week for construction of a test track

A deal has been finalized for the first step in making Elon Musk’s Hyperloop idea a reality.

The Tesla CEO first proposed the Hyperloop—a long system of pressurized tubes that would allow for super-high-speed travel between San Francisco and Los Angeles—two years ago. The concept, laid out in a nearly 60-page public white paper, looked crazy to some, maybe impossible.

But a private company called Hyperloop Transportation Technologies (no affiliation with Musk or Tesla) has picked up the mantle of making the Hyperloop real. The company first announced back in February that it had plans to build a five-mile test track in California. Now it has closed a deal with local landowners in central California to begin construction of it along a stretch of road right near the Interstate 5 freeway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, according to the Navigant Research blog.

Hyperloop Transportation Technologies is operating independently of Musk (though the inventor and entrepreneur has encouraged anyone to apply his idea), and in fact, Musk has his own test track planned for Texas, as he revealed in a tweet in January:

Construction of the California test track is set for 2016, and will cost at least $100 million—a cost that Hyperloop Transportation Technologies aims to cover by going public this year. And the estimated cost of the full Hyperloop, which would have to run 400 miles in length between the two cities? $8 billion.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

TIME Smartphones

This Texting-While-Driving Study Will Make You Afraid to Drive

Texting is only the tip of the iceberg

Drivers using their smartphones behind the wheel aren’t just texting — they’re emailing, browsing the web, tweeting and even video chatting.

Those are just some of the activities that smartphone-using drivers fessed up to in a survey commissioned by AT&T. The report is tied to the wireless company’s It Can Wait campaign, which launched in 2010 to raise awareness of the dangers of using smartphones while driving.

Texting remains the most popular activity among these distracted drivers, according to the survey, but about one-third said they e-mailed on their phones while driving, and one-tenth of said they were on Snapchat.

Here’s a full breakdown:

 

TIME Crime

Motorcycle Culture’s Long History of Image Problems

A recent biker brawl highlights an old conflict

The deadly shootout between police and biker gangs in Waco, Tex., has put a spotlight on one of American culture’s more confusing distinctions: the difference between motorcycle-loving hobbyists and organized biker gangs. As a former undercover agent told the Associated Press, the public and law enforcement can have trouble distinguishing between two subcultures that share lots of similarities.

That confusion is nearly as old as America’s motorcycle culture. In its early years, the nation’s motorbike market was relatively small. As TIME explained in 1939, it got a boost when Euthrie Paul du Pont, of the famous du Pont family, invested in the Indian Motorcycle Co. The company joined with Harley-Davidson, the other leading U.S. manufacturer, to sponsor the American Motorcycle Association and hold organized races that boosted the popularity of riding. When TIME covered the 1953 National Motorcycle Championship, the magazine found that the participants—drawn from the AMA’s 100,000 members— were “most of them temporary escapees from workaday jobs as mechanics, farmers or motorcycle dealers.”

By then, however, those weekend warriors had been joined in the public imagination by a darker element. In 1947, a fight among bikers led to a notorious melee in Hollister, Calif. That was followed by Frank Rooney’s 1951 story The Cyclists’ Raid, about a fictional violent biker gang, which in turn inspired the 1954 film The Wild One, starring Marlon Brando as an iconoclastic biker. “The audience sits frozen with a growing horror as the abscess of violence swells and swells until the watcher almost cries out for it to burst and be done with,” TIME’s critic wrote of the movie.

Meanwhile, the AMA tried to keep its distance. In 1957, for example, an AMA event in Angels Camp, Calif., was marred by violence. The small town had agreed to host motorcycle races and had taken precautions—quadrupling its two-man police force—in case of trouble. The safeguards, however, proved inadequate, as TIME reported:

The A.M.A. pitched its camp in the fair grounds just outside town. The hoodlums, their waists girdled by metal chains and their leather jackets emblazoned with gang names—Vampires, Huns, Tartars—parked their cycles on Main Street and tossed their bedrolls beside Angels Camp’s bubbling trout stream. Then they took over the community. They bought all the beer in town (100 cases), buzzed over to neighboring Altaville for more, and for wine. They guzzled fast, tossed empty cans and bottles into gutters. Residents soon found drunks stretched in their doorways. A group trailed a town girl; while one yelled obscenities, the rest of the pack twirled waist chains menacingly to discourage interference. Three of Angels Camp’s four bars shut down; merchants decided to close early. Then came action. Flashing down the Main Street hill with muffler throbbing, a long-haired youngster wheeled artfully through a knot of idlers, snatched a can of beer on the fly. Hundreds of daredevils kicked their starters, ready to meet his challenge.

Those clashes only intensified after the founding of the Hell’s Angels around 1950. In 1965, California Attorney General Thomas C. Lynch announced that an investigation of the Angels had found that its 450 members had earned 874 felony arrests between them, that their initiation rite required new members to supply a girl who was willing to sleep with everyone in the club, and that they often ran riot through whole towns, terrorizing residents for fun.

“Guzzling beer and shaking the countryside with obscene laughter, they broke up legitimate motorcycle rallies and often sacked small coastal towns. Perversely, pop music (Black Denim Trousers and Motorcycle Boots) and film (The Wild One) romanticized such outlaw riders as tragic, misunderstood loners, giving the Angels a place that they scarcely deserve in American folklore,” TIME later noted. “As the bike culture burgeoned, the Angels’ legend became as grimy as their beards, Levi’s and leather vests.”

The occasion for that remark was a 1971 knife fight between the Hells Angels and a rival gang called the Breed. It was at the time “the deadliest rumble in the history of maverick motorcycle gangs,” leaving five gang members dead and 21 injured. It was also another example of the tension between legit motorcycle lovers and those outside the law: the location chosen for the brawl was a trade show sponsored by the Cleveland Competition Club, a chartered American Motorcycle Association organization. “[The] annual show is designed to brighten motorcycling’s image, and has never witnessed as much trouble as a fistfight,” TIME wrote. “The proceeds were to go to a crippled children’s fund.”

TIME Transportation

Investigators Uncertain Anything Hit Train Before Derailment

The assistant conductor said she heard the regional train engineer say he'd been "hit by a rock or shot at"

(PHILADELPHIA) — Federal authorities said they are uncertain if anything struck the windshield of an Amtrak train before it derailed in Philadelphia last week, but they have not ruled out the possibility.

Investigators, however, said they are certain a gunshot did not strike the train before the May 12 derailment, which killed eight people and injured more than 200 others.

FBI agents performed forensic work on a grapefruit-sized fracture on the left side of the Amtrak locomotive’s windshield, and the National Transportation Safety Board said they found no evidence of any damage that could have been caused by a firearm.

The developments came Monday as trains began running to New York again for the first time in nearly a week. They also raised new questions about the events leading up to the derailment, including a conversation an assistant conductor told investigators she heard between the Amtrak engineer and a regional rail train engineer minutes before the train sped up and went off the rails at a curve.

The assistant conductor said she heard the regional train engineer say he’d been “hit by a rock or shot at” and she thought she heard the Amtrak engineer say his train had also been struck.

The NTSB said the regional train engineer recalled no such conversation, and investigators listened to the dispatch tape and heard no communications from the Amtrak engineer to the railroad’s dispatch center to say that something had struck the train.

The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority said it doesn’t know what caused the damage to its train that night.

Investigators have focused on the acceleration of the Amtrak train as it approached the curve, reaching 106 mph as it entered a 50 mph stretch and slowing down only slightly before the crash.

Amtrak engineer Brandon Bostian has told authorities he doesn’t recall anything in the few minutes before the derailment. He was among those injured.

The NTSB said Monday it could be a year before it determines the probable cause of the derailment.

Amtrak resumed service Monday with a 5:30 a.m. southbound train leaving New York City.

All Acela Express, Northeast Regional and other services also resumed service. Amtrak officials said Sunday that trains along the Northeast Corridor from Washington to Boston would return to service in “complete compliance” with federal safety orders.

TIME Transportation

Amtrak Resumes Full Service After Deadly Derailment

An Amtrak train travels northbound from 30th Street Station in Philadelphia on May 18, 2015.
Matt Slocum—AP An Amtrak train travels northbound from 30th Street Station in Philadelphia on May 18, 2015.

"Our infrastructure repairs have been made with the utmost care"

(PHILADELPHIA)—Amtrak trains began rolling on the busy Northeast Corridor early Monday, the first time in almost a week following a deadly crash in Philadelphia, and officials vowed to have safer trains and tracks while investigators worked to determine the cause of the derailment.

Amtrak resumed service along the corridor with a 5:30 a.m. southbound train leaving New York City. The first northbound train, scheduled to leave Philadelphia at 5:53 a.m., was delayed and pulled out of 30th Street Station at 6:07 a.m.

About three dozen passengers boarded the New York City-bound train in Philadelphia, and Mayor Michael Nutter was on hard to see the passengers and train off.

All Acela Express, Northeast Regional and other services were to also resume.

Amtrak officials said Sunday that trains along the Northeast Corridor from Washington to Boston would resume service in “complete compliance” with federal safety orders following last week’s deadly derailment.

Company President Joseph Boardman said Amtrak staff and crew have been working around the clock to restore service following Tuesday night’s crash that killed eight people and injured more than 200 others.

Boardman said Sunday that Amtrak would be offering a “safer service.”

In Philadelphia on Monday, Nutter stood on the platform, greeting passengers and crew members. He pulled out his cellphone and took pictures as the train rolled out just after 6 am.

“It’s great to be back,” said Christian Milton of Philadelphia. “I’ve never had any real problems with Amtrak. I’ve been traveling it for over 10 years. There’s one accident in 10 years. Something invariably is going to happen somewhere along the lines. I’m not worried about it.”

Milton said he’d probably be sleeping as the train goes around the curve where the derailment happened. But, he said he’ll think about victims.

“I might say a prayer for the people who died and got injured,” he said.

Tom Carberry, of Philadelphia, praised the agencies involved in restoring service.

“My biggest takeaway was the under-promise and over-deliver and the surprise of having it come back this morning when that wasn’t expected,” Carberry said. “That was a good thing for Amtrak.”

At New York City’s Penn Station early Monday, police with a pair of dogs flanked the escalator as a smattering of passengers showed their tickets to a broadly smiling Amtrak agent and headed down to the platform.

A sign outside the train flashed “All Aboard” in red letters.

The conductor gave a broad all-clear wave, stepped inside and the train glided out of the station at 5:30 a.m.

Passenger Raphael Kelly of New York, looking relaxed, said he was “feeling fine” and had “no worries.”

Kelly, who takes Amtrak to Philadelphia weekly, said with a smile that if he did have any concerns, “I have to get over it.”

Kelly said that if anything, the train might be safer than ever.

“They’re on their toes” because of the crash, he said.

At a service Sunday evening at the site to honor the crash victims, Boardman choked up as he called Tuesday “the worst day for me as a transportation professional.” He vowed that the wrecked train and its passengers “will never be forgotten.”

Federal regulators on Saturday ordered Amtrak to expand use of a speed-control system long in effect for southbound trains near the crash site to northbound trains in the same area.

Federal Railroad Administration spokesman Kevin Thompson said Sunday the automatic train control system is now fully operational on the northbound tracks. Trains going through that section of track will be governed by the system, which alerts engineers to slow down when their trains go too fast and automatically applies the brakes if the train continues to speed.

The agency also ordered Amtrak to examine all curves along the Northeast Corridor and determine if more can be done to improve safety, and to add more speed limit signs along the route.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx told the 150 people present at Sunday’s service that Amtrak’s action on the ordered changes was one way to honor the eight passengers killed in the crash. Many were riding home to their families, he said.

“Their memories forever in our minds will fuel our work to make intercity passenger rail and our entire network in the United States stronger and safer,” he said.

Almost 20 people injured in the train crash remain in Philadelphia hospitals, five in critical condition. All are expected to survive.

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board, meanwhile, have focused on the acceleration of the train as it approached the curve, finally reaching 106 mph as it entered the 50-mph stretch north of central Philadelphia, and only managing to slow down slightly before the crash.

“The only way that an operable train can accelerate would be if the engineer pushed the throttle forward. And … the event recorder does record throttle movement. We will be looking at that to see if that corresponds to the increase in the speed of the train,” board member Robert Sumwalt told CNN’s “State of the Union.”

The Amtrak engineer, who was among those injured in the crash, has told authorities that he does not recall anything in the few minutes before it happened. Characterizing engineer Brandon Bostian as extremely safety conscious, a close friend said he believed reports of something striking the windshield were proof that the crash was “not his fault.”

“He’s the one you’d want to be your engineer. There’s none safer,” James Weir of Burlison, Tennessee, told The Associated Press in a telephone interview on Sunday.

Investigators also have been looking into reports that the windshield of the train may have been struck by some sort of object, but Sumwalt said on CBS’s “Face the Nation” program Sunday that he wanted to “downplay” the idea that damage to the windshield might have come from someone firing a shot at the train.

“I’ve seen the fracture pattern; it looks like something about the size of a grapefruit, if you will, and it did not even penetrate the entire windshield,” Sumwalt said.

Officials said an assistant conductor on the derailed train said she heard the Amtrak engineer talking with a regional train engineer and both said their trains had been hit by objects. But Sumwalt said the regional train engineer recalls no such conversation, and investigators had listened to the dispatch tape and heard no communications from the Amtrak engineer to the dispatch center to say that something had struck the train.

TIME Transportation

Feds Order Amtrak to Slow Speeding Trains Near Derailment Site

Workers labor on the site where a deadly train derailment occurred earlier in the week, on May 15, 2015, in Philadelphia.
Julio Cortez—AP Workers labor on the site where a deadly train derailment occurred earlier in the week, on May 15, 2015, in Philadelphia.

Amtrak must use an automatic train control system that stops trains from speeding

(PHILADELPHIA)—Federal officials announced Saturday that Amtrak must immediately expand its use of a speed restriction system on Philadelphia’s northbound rails where a speeding train reached 106 mph, flew off the tracks and crashed, killing eight people.

The Federal Railroad Administration said an emergency order would be issued in coming days that calls for Amtrak to ensure the presence of the automatic train control system that notifies an engineer when a train is above the speed limit and automatically applies the brakes if the engineer doesn’t act to slow the train down.

The system is already being used for southbound trains approaching the curve where Tuesday’s derailment occurred.

Amtrak said it would abide by the federal directive and others announced Saturday, adding that Amtrak’s “overarching goal is to provide safe and secure rail passenger travel.”

The train was traveling from Washington, D.C., to New York when it flew off the tracks at Philadelphia. About 200 people were injured, and at least eight people remained in critical condition in Philadelphia hospitals Saturday. All were expected to survive.

Investigators have been looking into why the train hit the speed of about 106 mph in a 50 mph zone. The FBI also is looking into the possibility that the windshield of the train was hit by an object shortly before the train derailed. The engineer, who was injured in the crash, told authorities he did not recall anything in the few minutes before it happened.

The Federal Railroad Administration also ordered Amtrak to analyze curves to assess risks on the Northeast Corridor, the busy stretch of tracks between Washington and Boston, and determine if more can be done to improve safety.

“In areas where approach speed is significantly higher than curve speed, the appropriate technology intended to prevent over-speed derailments must be implemented immediately,” the agency said.

Amtrak also will have to increase the amount and frequency of signage alerting engineers and conductors of the maximum authorized speed.

After the crash, Amtrak president Joseph Boardman vowed to have the next-generation positive train control system in operation along the railroad by the end of the year, as Congress mandated in 2008. The system uses transponders, wireless radio and computers to prevent trains from going over the speed limit.

Company spokesman Craig Schulz said Saturday that Amtrak also plans to look into whether it could partially activate some of the capabilities already installed along the Northeast Corridor without delaying the complete activation of the next-generation system later this year. The system — which can be programmed with specific speed limits based on work schedules, track curvature and other conditions — is in service on only 50 of the 226 miles between Washington and New York.

Amtrak hopes to resume limited service between Philadelphia and New York on Monday with full service expected the following day. Officials say the railroad has been repairing the tracks, signals and overhead power lines since the crash.

NTSB member Robert Sumwalt said investigators have been documenting safety features in all cars and testing signals and signal circuitry as the track was being rebuilt. He said investigators planned to reconnect the damaged cars and connect the brake lines in order to test the braking system over the weekend.

Sumwalt also said the FBI is investigating the possibility that the windshield of the train was hit by an object shortly before the train derailed. Officials said an assistant conductor said she heard the engineer talking with a regional train engineer and both said their trains had been hit by objects.

A funeral service was held Friday on Long Island for Justin Zemser, a 20-year-old midshipman at the U.S. Naval Academy. A memorial service was held Saturday for 39-year-old educational-software executive Rachel Jacobs in New York, and a funeral is scheduled Monday in Holmdel, New Jersey, for Robert Gildersleeve Jr., 45, of Elkridge, Maryland. Gildersleeve was vice president of a food-safety company called Ecolab.

TIME Transportation

See the Letter Amtrak’s President Sent to Customers About the Fatal Derailment

"Amtrak takes full responsibility and deeply apologizes for our role in this tragic event"

Amtrak president and CEO Joe Boardman addressed the deadly Philadelphia derailment of train 188 that killed eight people in a letter sent to Amtrak customers on Friday. “With truly heavy hearts, we mourn those who died,” Boardman’s letter reads. “Amtrak takes full responsibility and deeply apologizes for our role in this tragic event.” The National Transportation Safety Board and FBI are investigating the incident.

See the full letter below:

A MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT AND CEO JOE BOARDMAN ON TRAIN 188
The derailment of Northeast Regional Train 188 was a terrible tragedy that we are responding to with every resource we have available. The National Transportation Safety Board is leading the investigation to determine the cause of the incident, and Amtrak is providing full cooperation.

With truly heavy hearts, we mourn those who died. Their loss leaves holes in the lives of their families and communities. On behalf of the entire Amtrak family, I offer our sincere sympathies and prayers for them and their loved ones. Amtrak takes full responsibility and deeply apologizes for our role in this tragic event.

We recognize that for everyone onboard the train, including those who suffered injuries, the healing process may be long. Within 24 hours of the incident, Amtrak set up a Family Assistance Center in Philadelphia to work closely with the family of passengers and crew on the train. We are also working with the individuals and families affected by this event to help them with transportation, lodging, and of course, medical bills and funeral expenses.

Amtrak is ever grateful to the City of Philadelphia—its first responders who bravely worked in difficult conditions, including the dark of night, to rescue and provide aid to hundreds; its hospital personnel who went into full alert as patients arrived at emergency rooms; its officials who quickly implemented a response plan; and its citizens who opened their doors to offer assistance.

Although our current focus is on the passengers and employees affected by this incident and the resulting service disruption along the Northeast Corridor, we must also take time to learn from this event. Passenger railroading is at its core about people; the safety of our passengers and employees was, is and always will be our number one priority. Our goal is to fully understand what happened and how we can prevent a similar tragedy from occurring in the future. We will also continue to focus on completing Positive Train Control implementation in the Northeast Corridor by December of 2015.

Thank you for your support of America’s Railroad during this difficult time.

Sincerely,

Joe Boardman
President and Chief Executive Officer

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com