TIME Management

Nike Co-Founder Phil Knight to Step Down as Chairman

Phil Knight Nike Chairman
Bloomberg via Getty Images Phil Knight attends a panel discussion at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 15, 2013.

Knight recommended CEO Mark Parker to succeed him as chairman

Nike co-founder Phil Knight, who built the iconic athletic gear brand from a small-scale shoe business, will step down as chairman next year, the company announced on Tuesday.

Knight, 77, has recommended to the Nike Board of Directors that CEO Mark Parker to succeed him as chairman, the company said in a statement. Nike also announced that Knight’s 41-year-old son, Travis Knight, was named as the newest member of the board.

“For me, Nike has always been more than just a company – it has been my life’s passion,” said Knight, who co-founded Nike, then known as Blue Ribbon Sports, in 1964 with his former college track coach, Bill Bowerman.

Knight, who plans to stay involved with the company, added that he will transfer most of his Nike Class A Common Stock to a limited liability entity called Swoosh LLC, managed by Knight, Parker and two other Nike executives. Since Class A shares generally hold more voting rights, the transfer will allow Swoosh to elect about three-quarters of Nike’s board.

“I believe this structure will maintain NIKE’s strong corporate governance, which has focused our management on serving the consumer and pursuing profitable, long-term growth,” Knight said.

TIME Sports

When ‘Baseball’s Most Attractive Bachelor’ Pitched His First No-Hitter

Sandy Koufax would pitch four no-hitters and one perfect game in his career with the Dodgers

On June 30, 1962, Sandy Koufax pitched his first no-hitter for the Dodgers. Up against the New York Mets, Koufax struck out 13 batters and walked five to lead his team to victory. It was his first of four career no-hitters—a feat achieved, to this day, fewer than 300 times in the history of Major League Baseball.

The following summer, LIFE put Koufax on its cover, calling him “The Mostest Pitcher: Most Wins, Most Shutouts, Most Strike-outs.” Southpaw Sandy, as they called the left-handed pitcher, said that his success in that position stemmed from his failure as a batter. Even as a kid, he knew enough about his own weaknesses to tell his coach, who tried him out at pitcher.

It was perhaps no coincidence that the photo that graced the magazine’s cover could have doubled as a menswear ad, had they swapped Koufax’s baseball cap for a fedora. The magazine made no secret of his dapper looks, writing that on top of being “the best pitcher in the past decade,” Koufax was also a hot ticket among female fans. The description reads like a personal ad, save for the mention of his then-girlfriend Linda Kennon:

He also stands out as baseball’s most attractive bachelor. Tall and 27, he has poise, a literary mind and a resonant, softly modulated voice. He lives alone in a suburban home with several oil paintings, a well-stocked library and a self-installed stereo system. His car is gold-colored and his girl was runner-up for the title of Miss U.S.A.

In addition to his penchant for oil paintings and good books, Koufax made his principles quietly clear. Two years after the LIFE cover story, he would make headlines not for his pitching but for refusing to pitch, when he sat out the first game of the 1965 World Series because it fell on Yom Kippur, one of the most important holidays of the Jewish year.

Koufax, for his part, could have done without the attention that went along with his celebrity. “I don’t like to be on display,” he told LIFE, though he obliged when kids mobbed him for his autograph after games. Despite that sentiment, Koufax, now 79, will be forever on display: at 36, he became the youngest player ever inducted to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

August 2, 1963 cover of LIFE magazine.
Mark Kauffman—LIFE Magazine

Liz Ronk, who edited this gallery, is the Photo Editor for LIFE.com. Follow her on Twitter @lizabethronk.

TIME Sports

Meet the Women’s Wimbledon Champion Who Was Also a Spy

Alice Marble won 18 Grand Slam championships -- but her life off the court was as fascinating as her tennis career was impressive

Alice Marble’s tennis career was enough to make her a legend. She was the No. 1 female player in America between 1936 and 1940, a winner of 18 Grand Slam championships, an International Tennis Hall of Famer and the first woman to adopt the serve-and-volley style of play. Her aggressive nature on the court led some to say (critically) that she played like a man.

But it’s the fascinating life Marble lived off the court that makes her more than just a memorable athlete. By the time her career got underway, Marble had overcome a great deal of adversity. In her second autobiography, Courting Danger, she recounted being raped by a stranger when she was 15, a trauma that she hid from her mother out of shame. Then, as her career was taking off in her early 20s, she fell ill with tuberculosis and required a year of recuperation.

After putting her decorated tennis career behind her, Marble made a bit of a career pivot. DC comics approached her to solicit—as they did from many notable athletes—an endorsement for their new superhero, Wonder Woman. Instead of offering a sentence of support, she became an associate editor of the comic, establishing a new weekly feature called “Wonder Women of history…as told by Alice Marble,” in which she told the stories of women like Florence Nightingale in comic form.

World War II brought new adventures, although for Marble they began with a double tragedy that led to a failed attempt to take her own life. Days after she miscarried a pregnancy, her husband Joe Crowley, a fighter pilot, was killed in action. Inconsolable, Marble reported in her memoir that she accepted without hesitation when the government approached her about operating as a spy in Switzerland—a mission revealed only after Marble’s death, when her book was published. “I felt I had nothing left to lose but my life,” she wrote, “and at the time I didn’t care about living.”

Marble’s mission to obtain Nazi financial information was cut short when she was shot in the back by a Nazi operative.

But the story doesn’t end there: after recovering and reestablishing herself in the U.S, she set her sights on a new cause, the racial integration of tennis. Her July 1950 editorial in American Lawn Tennis Magazine advocated for fellow player Althea Gibson to be allowed to play in U.S. Lawn Tennis Association competitions; it was the first major public challenge to the establishment’s practice of segregation. “If tennis is a game for ladies and gentlemen, it’s also time we acted a little more like gentlepeople and less like sanctimonious hypocrites,” she wrote. Marble’s letter was a major contributing factor in Gibson’s invitation to play in the tournament now known as the U.S. Open.

Before Wonder Woman and the Nazis, back in 1939 when Marble was at the pinnacle of her career, LIFE put her on its cover. In the story, the magazine chided the rest of the media for focusing on Marble’s glamor when in fact she was all about grit. (She did, after all, choose comfort over glamor on the court, where she eschewed the tradition of ladies wearing skirts and opted for shorts instead.) As LIFE wrote:

Newspaper writers like to think of Alice Marble as a glamor girl. They prattle about her beautiful clothes, her night-club singing, her movie offers. They call her the “streamlined Venus of the tennis courts.” All this is nonsense. She is a pretty girl who looks well in shorts. Her arms and legs are too long and muscular, and she plays too much of a slambang game of tennis to be glamorous…Even today, at 26, she is somewhat of a tomboy, hits a tennis ball harder than do most men. In fact, if she had her way, she would play only in men’s tournaments.

Marble was a Grand Slam-winning, spying-on-Nazis, comic book-editing champion for equality. It’s a wonder we’re still waiting on the Hollywood biopic.

August 28, 1939 issue of LIFE magazine.

Liz Ronk, who edited this gallery, is the Photo Editor for LIFE.com. Follow her on Twitter @lizabethronk.

MONEY Sports

The 10 Highest Paid Women Soccer Stars

Top male soccer stars like Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo earn more than $40 million a year. Here's how much less women footballers make in comparison.

  • Marta Vieira da Silva

    Marta of Brazil in action during the FIFA Women's World Cup 2015 Round of 16 match between Brazil and Australia at Moncton Stadium on June 21, 2015 in Moncton, Canada.
    Clive Rose—FIFA via Getty Images Marta of Brazil in action during the FIFA Women's World Cup 2015 Round of 16 match between Brazil and Australia at Moncton Stadium on June 21, 2015 in Moncton, Canada.

    The Brazilian born soccer star who often goes by the single name Marta plays for the Brazilian National Team, but plays professionally in Sweden. She commanded the whopping salary of nearly $400,000 from her previous team, Tyresö FF, although the salary was reportedly paid by sponsors. Tyresö FF disbanded for financial reasons, but Viera stayed in Sweden by signing with FC Rosengård.

  • Alex Morgan

    Alex Morgan #13 of the United States tires to get past Sarah Nnodim #22 of Nigeria during the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Group D match between Nigeria and The United States June, 16, 2015 at BC Place Stadium in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
    Rich Lam—Getty Images Alex Morgan #13 of the United States tires to get past Sarah Nnodim #22 of Nigeria during the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Group D match between Nigeria and The United States June, 16, 2015 at BC Place Stadium in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

    One of the stars of the US Women’s World Cup Team, Morgan plays professionally for the Portland Thorns in the US National Women’s Soccer League (NWSL). Sportsgoogly.com reports that Morgan’s salary was increased to $450,000; if true, that must be through subsidies or sponsors as the NWSL is salary-capped at $200,000 per team. Whatever her salary is, she’s making more in endorsements, with estimates ranging above $1 million.

  • Abby Wambach

    United States forward Abby Wambach (20) runs down a ball in the box against Colombia defender Angela Clavijo (13) during the first half in the round of sixteen in the FIFA 2015 women's World Cup soccer tournament at Commonwealth Stadium.
    Michael Chow—USA Today Sports/Reuters United States forward Abby Wambach (20) runs down a ball in the box against Colombia defender Angela Clavijo (13) during the first half in the round of sixteen in the FIFA 2015 women's World Cup soccer tournament at Commonwealth Stadium.

    The world-record holder for international goals (men or women) recently announced that 2015 is her last run on the US World Cup team. She last played professionally for the Western New York Flash in the 2014 NWSL season and is taking the 2015 season off to prepare for the World Cup. Reports of her salary range from $190,000 to $300,000 — again, most likely through sponsorships.

  • Sydney Leroux

    Sydney Leroux of United States of America celebrates after the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Group D match between USA and Australia at Winnipeg Stadium on June 8, 2015 in Winnipeg, Canada.
    Adam Pretty—FIFA via Getty Images Sydney Leroux of United States of America celebrates after the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Group D match between USA and Australia at Winnipeg Stadium on June 8, 2015 in Winnipeg, Canada.

    Born in Surrey, British Columbia, Leroux now plays for the US World Cup team and plays professionally for the Western New York Flash. Estimates of her salary range from $60,000 to $92,500.

  • Nicole Banecki

    Nicole Banecki
    Bongarts—Getty Images Nicole Banecki

    Of mixed Cameroonian and German descent, Banecki plays for the German World Cup team as well as SC Freiburg in the German football league (Bundesliga). Her salary is listed at $90,000.

  • Amandine Henry

    Amandine Henry of France is challenged by of Korea during the FIFA Womens's World Cup round of 16 match between France and Korea at Olympic Stadium on June 21, 2015 in Montreal, Canada.
    Stuart Franklin—FIFA via Getty Images Amandine Henry of France is challenged by of Korea during the FIFA Womens's World Cup round of 16 match between France and Korea at Olympic Stadium on June 21, 2015 in Montreal, Canada.

    Henry plays defensive midfield for the French club Olympique Lyon, and is an important member of the French World Cup team, having scored an amazingly long goal against Mexico in the 2015 World Cup. Henry’s estimated salary range is from $60,000-$70,000.

  • Nilla Fischer

    Nilla Fischer #5 of Sweden reacts after scoring the second goal against goalkeeper Precious Dede #1 of Nigeria with Emma Berglund #4 during the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Group D match between Sweden and Nigeria at Winnipeg Stadium on June 8, 2015 in Winnipeg, Canada.
    Kevin C. Cox—Getty Images Nilla Fischer #5 of Sweden reacts after scoring the second goal against goalkeeper Precious Dede #1 of Nigeria with Emma Berglund #4 during the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Group D match between Sweden and Nigeria at Winnipeg Stadium on June 8, 2015 in Winnipeg, Canada.

    Known for her distinctive haircut, Fischer plays for both VfL Wolfsburg in the German league and the Swedish national team. Fischer’s salary is approximately $65,000.

  • Hope Solo

    Goalkeeper Hope Solo #1 of the United States looks on in the second half against Colombia in the FIFA Women's World Cup 2015 Round of 16 match at Commonwealth Stadium on June 22, 2015 in Edmonton, Canada.
    Kevin C. Cox—Getty Images Goalkeeper Hope Solo #1 of the United States looks on in the second half against Colombia in the FIFA Women's World Cup 2015 Round of 16 match at Commonwealth Stadium on June 22, 2015 in Edmonton, Canada.

    The controversial yet talented US World Cup goalkeeper and wife of former Seattle Seahawks (NFL) tight end Jerramy Stevens plays professionally for the Seattle Reign of the NWSL. Estimates of Solo’s salary vary greatly, from $22,000 to $65,000.

  • Jonelle Filigno

    Jonelle Filigno #16 of Canada high fives fans after the team warmup prior to the start of the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Round of 16 match between Switzerland and Canada June, 21, 2015 at BC Place Stadium in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
    Rich Lam—Getty Images Jonelle Filigno #16 of Canada high fives fans after the team warmup prior to the start of the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015 Round of 16 match between Switzerland and Canada June, 21, 2015 at BC Place Stadium in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

    Filigno gets the exciting chance to play for the 2015 World Cup in her native Canada as part of the Canadian World Cup team. She also plays professionally for Sky Blue FC in the NWSL (on the campus of Rutgers University in New Jersey). Filigno’s salary is approximately $60,000.

  • Laure Boulleau

    Laure Boulleau #3 of France takes the ball in the first half against England during the FIFA Women's World Cup 2015 Group F match at Moncton Stadium on June 9, 2015 in Moncton, Canada.
    Elsa—Getty Images Laure Boulleau #3 of France takes the ball in the first half against England during the FIFA Women's World Cup 2015 Group F match at Moncton Stadium on June 9, 2015 in Moncton, Canada.

    Boulleau plays for Paris St.-Germain in the French league as well as playing for the French World Cup team. Boulleau’s salary is estimated at $60,000.

    Sources for all earnings reported in this story:
    SportsGoogly, Sporteology, Sportyghost, Dailyentertainment, TSMplay, EqualizerSoccer, USA Today, UEFA, NWSLsoccer, NESN & Fusion.

    More From MoneyTips:

MONEY Sports

NBA Draft Tickets Are Crazy Expensive Right Now

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver commences the 2014 NBA Draft at Barclays Center on June 26, 2014 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
Mike Stobe—Getty Images NBA Commissioner Adam Silver at the 2014 NBA Draft at Barclays Center.

Fans are paying hundreds of dollars to watch the "action."

Some basketball fans are so excited for the coming NBA season that they are paying upwards of $300 for tickets — not to any game, mind you, but to the league’s draft.

The draft is being hosted by the Brooklyn Nets, and will take place Thursday night at the Barclays Center. Tickets on the secondary sales site SeatGeek right now are going for an average of about $90, though seats closer to the stage where NBA Commissioner Adam Silver will announce the picks are being listed for between $200 and $500.

The highest anyone has actually paid so far is reportedly $350, but some resellers are asking for thousands of dollars.

Face value for these tickets is $25 to $55, but demand has been especially high for this draft, leading to higher resale prices. The average ticket price for Thursday’s draft is higher than all but a handful of the Nets games that will take place in the upcoming season, says SeakGeek analyst Chris Leyden.

Why are prices hitting the roof for an event that basically consists of someone reading names? Local interest seems to be playing a big role. The New York Knicks are slotted for fourth pick of the draft, which is the team’s highest position since 1985, when it chose Georgetown’s Patrick Ewing. Of those searching for tickets to the draft on SeatGeek, 80% are based in the New York metro area, says Leyden.

The nearby Philadelphia 76ers have the third pick in the draft this year, which means Philly-based fans don’t have far to travel if they want in on the fun. The Minnesota Timberwolves and Los Angeles Lakers have first and second pick, respectively.

Read next: Patriots’ Rob Gronkowski Hasn’t Spent a Dime of His NFL Salary

TIME Sports

See Photos From South Africa’s Monumental Rugby World Cup Victory

It was recreated in the movie 'Invictus'

It was exactly 20 years ago, on June 24, 1995, that South Africa beat rival New Zealand to win that year’s Rugby World Cup. It was the first World Cup for South Africa, as the nation had been kept out of the competition during apartheid, so the victory was a meaningful one—but, as anyone who has seen the 2009 film Invictus knows, the game was even more meaningful for what happened off the field.

In South Africa, rugby had been seen as a sport for white Afrikaaners, but President Nelson Mandela saw that the tournament could be a chance for a broader social reconciliation. As TIME reported that May, the sport could herald a united future in which “at rugby matches, thick-necked Afrikaans players stand at attention for the black liberation and nationalist hymn Nkosi Sikelel i Afrika (God Bless Africa).” By the time the 1995 World Cup was over, that vision was much closer to being a reality.

Following Mandela’s death in 2013, TIME published an interview with Francois Pienaar, who had been captain of that 1995 team. Pienaar reflected on his relationship with Mandela, the link between sports and politics, and the moment he realized that June 24 game would go down in history:

Were you aware this was more than a game?

Not before the competition started. But in six weeks, I saw the country change. At our hotel in Cape Town, the lady who checked us in was wearing a Springbok jumper. The gentleman who served us breakfast would say we must eat because we needed to be strong. The morning of the final [in Johannesburg], we went for a run, and four black kids selling newspapers chased after us, shouting the names of the players. After the match, when an interviewer asked me how it felt to win in front of 65,000 people, I replied, “We didn’t have 65,000. We had 43 million.”

Read an interview with Francois Pienaar about Nelson Mandela’s legacy, here in the TIME Vault: A Leader and a Champion

TIME Baseball

Watch This Baseball Fan Effortlessly Catch a Foul Ball While Holding a Baby

LA Dodgers at Chicago Cubs
Nuccio DiNuzzo—Chicago Tribune/TNS/Getty Images Keith Hartley being interviewed by a TV reporter after he snagged a foul ball while bottle-feeding his infant 7-month-old son during the second inning of a Chicago Cubs vs. Los Angeles Dodgers game on June 23, 2015

Hartley caught the ball because he was afraid it might ricochet off the railing and hit his 7-month-old son

Although fans catching foul balls in Chicago have historically been much maligned, things went a bit differently for Keith Hartley on Tuesday. Hartley, who caught a foul ball one-handed during a Chicago Cubs–Los Angeles Dodgers game on Tuesday night, is being celebrated largely because of what he had in his other hand — his 7-month-old son.

The moment came in the game’s second inning, as Dodgers first baseman Adrian Gonzalez ran to catch a foul ball down the first baseline, ESPN reports. And although it earned the Cubs an out for fan interference, ending the inning, Twitter and Vine still had a Wrigley Field day lauding Hartley’s dexterity and insouciant paternal instincts. Hartley told ESPN he attempted the catch for fear that the ball might ricochet off the rail and hit his son Isaac.

Despite their brief interaction, Gonzalez did not react to Hartley’s catch. “Hopefully he’s not too angry,” Hartley told ESPN. “He is on my fantasy team. I want to keep him happy.”

[ESPN]

MONEY Sports

Patriots’ Rob Gronkowski Hasn’t Spent a Dime of His NFL Salary

gronkowski-patriots-gronk-nfl-earnings-endorsements
Kevin C. Cox—Getty Images Rob Gronkowski of the New England Patriots celebrates after Super Bowl XLIX on February 1, 2015.

Gronk claims he has not spent "one dime" of his $10 million in contract money.

New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski has been saving like a pro during his five seasons in the National Football League—at least according to his new book, It’s Good to Be Gronk.

The football star claims he has been spending only his endorsement money, not his NFL salary, and avoids making big-ticket purchases.

“To this day, I still haven’t touched one dime of my signing bonus or NFL contract money. I live off my marketing money and haven’t blown it on any big-money expensive cars, expensive jewelry or tattoos and still wear my favorite pair of jeans from high school,” Gronkowski writes in an excerpt of the book published Monday on Sports Illustrated‘s MMQB blog.

If that’s true, he’s likely amassed at least $10 million (or more, if he’s been investing his savings). Given that a disproportionately high number of NFL players blow through their money and end up filing for bankruptcy, it seems that Gronk is a rare role model among his peers.

Well, at least when it comes to money.

TIME Veterans

See Powerful Photos of Wounded Warrior Athletes

More than 600,000 Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans have been left partially or totally disabled from physical or psychological wounds received during their service. Ever year, hundreds of Wounded Warriors from every branch of military service compete in a variety of sports over 10 days at the Department of Defense's Warrior Games. What they have in common is the will to overcome

TIME Sports

See 18 Athletes Who Changed the Game for Women

In honor of Title IX, which became law on June 23, 1972

When Title IX was enacted on June 23, 1972, the federal law changed athletic life for American women, as TIME explained in a 1978 cover story about women and sports:

Only a tiny minority of girls appear to want to play contact sports against boys. But there is no doubt that the girls want and indeed are insisting upon a fair chance to develop their athletic abilities. Their cause is being substantially helped, albeit unevenly so far, by a section of the Education Amendments Act passed by Congress in 1972: the passage known as Title IX. In essence, Title IX forbids sex discrimination in any educational institution receiving federal funds. The prohibition applies on the athletic fields as well as in classrooms.

Of course, there were plenty of great female athletes before Title IX—and its passage didn’t mean that women stopped breaking new ground. Those who wanted to play found a way, despite limited options and sometimes-violent opposition. Here are just a few of those pioneering women.

Read the full 1978 story here, in the TIME Vault: Comes the Revolution

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com