TIME Sports

Watch an Epic Dunk Bring Down the Entire Hoop at a College Basketball Game

No one was injured

At a recent basketball game between Northern Illinois and Central Michigan, spectators saw something pretty rare: the entire hoop and the supporting structure came tumbling down.

Northern Illinois’s Pete Rakocevic was barreling toward the hoop and sunk a two-handed dunk. The crowd cheered, but then the backboard began to fall just moments later. It nearly collapsed onto a Central Michigan player, who managed to move out of the way with just a second to spare.

As CBS Sports points out, this could have caused some serious injuries. Luckily, everyone was okay.

Read next: This Is the Most Insane Basketball Shot You’ll See All Season

TIME Sports

See Photos from Minnie Minoso’s Early Days in Major League Baseball

'A Cuban who plays almost anywhere,' LIFE wrote in 1951, 'they just say, "Go on out there, son, and play any position that’s open."'

Orestes “Minnie” Minoso, who died Sunday at 90, held a number of titles during his long and storied baseball career. He was the first black Cuban player in Major League Baseball. The American League leader, at different moments, in hits, doubles, triples, sacrifice flies, stolen bases and total bases. Seven-time All-Star and, as he came to be known after a stellar 1951 season, “Mr. White Sox.”

But there was one title Minoso never managed to add to the list: Hall of Famer. At least, not at the hall of fame that mattered to him most. Though he was elected to the Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame and the Mexican Professional Baseball Hall of Fame, he never made the trip to Cooperstown as an official inductee.

“My last dream is to be in Cooperstown, to be with those guys,” Minoso said a few years ago, after years of candidacy had gone unanswered.

But he did get to see a different dream realized in the months before he died, though it had nothing to do with at-bats or RBIs. When the news came in December 2014 that the U.S. and Cuba were resuming diplomatic relations after half a century, Minoso wrote for TIME, “I never thought this day would come in my lifetime.”

Minoso left Cuba in 1945 to play for the Negro Leagues and decided, in 1961, to leave for good, bidding farewell to his family forever. Reflecting on what the news meant for a possible return to his home country, Minoso wrote, “Maybe I’ll see some of the same trees, the same sugar fields, I remembered as a boy.”

Liz Ronk, who edited this gallery, is the Photo Editor for LIFE.com. Follow her on Twitter at @LizabethRonk.

TIME Sports

See Wilt Chamberlain’s Record-Breaking Career in Photos

“I could win games with two sorority girls, two Phi Beta Kappas and Wilt Chamberlain.” So great was Chamberlain’s talent, according to his University of Kansas coach Phog Allen, that the 7-foot-1-inch basketball phenom could win games with any other four players on the court. This star status led to a record-shattering NBA career. It also created a reputation for Chamberlain as a selfish and showy player—in LIFE’s words, “the self-appointed greatest.”

But even Chamberlain’s detractors had to admit that game after game, his towering presence often made the difference between victory and defeat. When he was sidelined with an injury in 1970, his Lakers teammate Jerry West told LIFE, “You don’t realize what one man can mean to a team. When you see that guy working, you know you’re in the game.”

Perhaps the most memorable of Chamberlain’s show-stopping performances happened on March 2, 1962, when the Philadelphia Warriors, for which he played at the time, were playing the New York Knicks. Chamberlain had been breaking his own records one after another that season, his third in the league. Averaging 50 points per game, he had already broken the NBA single-game scoring record of 71 points with 78 points during a game that went into triple-overtime. No player had scored more than 3,000 points in a season, and he was fast approaching 4,000.

That night, the Hershey Sports Arena was only half-full with the 4,000 spectators typical of the NBA’s poorly attended games of that era. Press attendance was limited, and the game was not televised, meaning there is no known footage of Chamberlain’s feat. Despite having been out until six in the morning the night before, Chamberlain handily reached 70 points, and then 80, at which point his teammates began making it their mission to get him the ball. The Knicks made it theirs to keep it away. The audience became so focused on his hitting the hundredth point that they barely registered that every point he scored was a new record.

The basket that broke the record came with 46 seconds to go, with an assist from Joe Ruklick, who later called himself “a walking footnote” in NBA history. Chamberlain said that despite that night’s record—which to this day still stands—the most meaningful of his myriad records was grabbing 55 rebounds against his rival, Bill Russell.

Chamberlain was so successful that fans in his day tended to take his talent for granted. Some attributed perhaps more credit than is fair to his height. As LIFE summed it up in 1967: “Averaging over 50 points a game one season, leading the pros year after year in scoring and rebounding, making a lion’s share of the record book his own. Things like that are merely how a Giant gets to be a Giant—as opposed, say, to the 7-foot freaks who can’t play and are merely tall.”

Liz Ronk, who edited this gallery, is the Photo Editor for LIFE.com. Follow her on Twitter at @LizabethRonk.

MONEY Customer Service

The Insulting Names That Businesses Call You Behind Your Back

150225_EM_WhatBusinessesCallYou
Lasse Kristensen—Shutterstock

Ever wonder how casinos, car dealerships, restaurants, pay TV providers, and online marketers refer to customers in private? The answers aren't pretty.

You may think you are a living, breathing, thinking, three-dimensional human being. To online marketers, however, you might just be classified as “waste.” That’s one of the revelations in a new report from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

“Many online marketers use algorithmic tools which automatically cluster people into groups with names like ‘target’ and ‘waste,'” the researchers explain. Those viewed as “targets” based on their personal data and online history are deemed worthy of retailer discounts and deals. On the other hand, because the majority of bankruptcies come as a result of medical expenses, “it is possible anyone visiting medical websites may be grouped into the ‘waste’ category and denied favorable offers.”

It’s insulting enough that your worthiness as a person and potential customer is being judged by some computer algorithm. And yet the words chosen for these groups we’re lumped into make this sifting process more impersonal and insulting still.

The study got us thinking about all the other disdainful, mocking, or otherwise insulting ways that companies have been known to refer to the paying customers and clients that, you know, keep these businesses in business. Even as you essentially pay the bills for these operations, you might be thought of as little more than …

Muppets
In 2012, the very public resignation of Greg Smith from Goldman Sachs revealed that the firm’s executives sometimes referred to clients as “muppets.” Apparently, in the U.K. the slang term is applied to someone who is ignorant or clueless and easily manipulated. In certain circles, an investor might also be dubbed an ostrich, pig, or sheep depending on if he, respectively, buries his head in the sand no matter what’s happening in the market, is overly greedy, or has no strategy and does whatever someone else tells him.

Bunnies, Grapes, Squirrels
Behind the scene at car dealerships, customers who are bad negotiators and easy for salespeople to push around and talk into deals are sometimes known as “bunnies” or “grapes,” presumably because they’re just waiting to be pounced on or squeezed, respectively. A “squirrel,” on the other hand, is a hated species of customer who hops from salesperson to salesperson with no sense of loyalty or thought to who should get the commission.

Dogs, Fish, Bait, Whales
These are all terms used in the world of gambling and casinos, and they generally refer to players who are losing or are likely to lose—to the house, but also to the shark sitting across the table. A “whale,” of course, is a high roller who bets big, and who therefore will probably lose big money at one time or another. For that matter, in the restaurant industry, “whales” are super-wealthy customers with so much money they don’t blink when running up bills into the tens of thousands at overpriced eateries where, for example, a Bud Light costs $11.

Campers, Rednecks
Also in the sphere of restaurants, these are two kinds of customers that seriously annoy the employees and owners. A group of “campers” camps out at their table for hours, eliminating the opportunity for a new party to run up a tab, while a “redneck” is another term for a cheapstake or stiff who doesn’t tip—perhaps because they’re not city folk and aren’t familiar with tipping etiquette.

The N Word
Some waitstaff not only refer to their customers using racial epithets, but they’re also dumb enough to put these derogatory terms in print on diners’ receipts. Examples have popped up in Pennsylvania, Texas, and Virginia, among other places. And yes, the incidents have resulted in lawsuits and people getting fired. On the flip side, some horrible restaurant customers have been known to leave insults (including the N word) instead of tips for their waiters.

Fat
Among the other popular, not particularly creative insults left on receipts is some variation of “fat”—“Fat Girls” and “Pink Fat Lady,” to name a couple specific examples.

The C Word
Yes, some angry Time Warner Cable customer service agent apparently went there, recently renaming a customer as “C*** Martinez” in a letter after she reported a problem with her service.

Assorted Expletives and Insults
The C word episode followed on the heels of multiple reports of agents at Comcast—Time Warner Cable’s equally hated pay TV competitor and would-be partner if the much-discussed merger ever takes place—renaming subscribers things like “A**hole,” “Whore,” “Dummy,” “Super B*tch,” and such. (Only whoever did the renaming at Comcast always used letters instead of asterisks.) There’s a good argument to be made that the absurd pricing and policies installed by pay TV providers are at the heart of why “customer service” agents so often hate subscribers, and why the feeling is mutual.

A Sad Person, a Hateful Mess
You’d think that New York Knicks owner James Dolan—a no-brainer to appear on a wide variety of Worst or Most Hated Owners in Sports in Sports roundups—would have developed a thick skin after years of criticism for astounding ineptness and mismanagement at the helm of one of sport’s most valuable franchises. But Dolan’s response to the recent criticism of one New Yorker who has been a fan of the team since 1952 shows otherwise.

“I am utterly embarrassed by your dealings with the Knicks,” the fan, Irving Bierman, wrote to Dolan, pleading with him to sell the team so that “fans can at least look forward to growing them in a positive direction.” Instead of taking the criticism constructively and thanking Bierman for watching the Knicks for 60+ years, Dolan responded via email by calling him “a sad person,” “a hateful mess,” “alcoholic maybe,” and likely “a negative force in everyone who comes in contact with you.” Dolan finished up the screed by telling Bierman to “start rooting for the Nets because the Knicks dont [sic] want you.”

While certainly extreme, Dolan’s message speaks to the disdain with which some sports owners and certain league executives seem to regard fans—who are supposed to root loyally and pay up for the product as a matter of blind faith, and never to question or criticize. For Dolan’s sake, let’s hope he never listens to sports talk radio. He probably wouldn’t like the ways that people refer to him.

TIME Sports

Nevada Gambling Regulators Sign Off on Olympic Betting

The state's sports books will offer bets on the Olympics for the first time in years

(LAS VEGAS) — Come summer 2016, when the best of the best athletes climb podiums wearing gold, silver and bronze medals, Las Vegas gamblers could very well be counting their green.

Nevada gambling regulators voted Thursday to allow the state’s sports books to offer bets on the Olympics for the first time in years.

Revised regulations say the Nevada Gaming Control Board chairman can limit the bets at his or her discretion. The wagers have been banned for more than a decade since the state made regulatory changes allowing bets on the state’s own sports teams but specifically barring non-college amateur events.

International sports books in Great Britain, Ireland and Australia and offshore Internet sites already allow such bets. South Point Hotel Casino pushed for the change with the support of other sports-book operators.

TIME Sports

The ‘Death Penalty’ and How the College Sports Conversation Has Changed

Mustangs Texas A&M Football
Bill Jansch—AP Photo Southern Methodist University tailback Erick Dickerson is all smiles on Nov. 2, 1982, in Texas Stadium.

On Feb. 25, 1987, the Southern Methodist University football team was suspended for an entire season. Nearly two decades later, the program has yet to recover

“It’s like what happened after we dropped the [atom] bomb in World War II. The results were so catastrophic that now we’ll do anything to avoid dropping another one.”

That’s how John Lombardi, former president of the University of Florida, described the so-called “death penalty” levied upon Southern Methodist University in 1987 after the NCAA determined that the school had been paying several of its football players.

Until the punishment came down—on this day, Feb. 25, in 1987—SMU had seemed like the opposite of a cautionary tale. The tiny Dallas university, with just 6,000 students, had finished its 1982 season undefeated, ranking No. 2 in the nation and winning the Cotton Bowl, and added a second Southwest Conference championship to its résumé two years later. The SMU of the early 1980s stood toe-to-toe with conference powers Texas, Texas A&M and Arkansas—and proved itself their equal.

Trouble was, SMU needed help standing with those giants. There aren’t many ways to build a dominant football program on the fly, but if you’re going to try, you need a coach who can convince a bunch of teenagers that they’re better off coming to your unheralded program than they are heading down the road to Austin or College Station or hopping a plane to Los Angeles or South Bend. That’s no easy task, even for a recruiter as gifted as Ron Meyer, who became SMU’s head coach in 1976. Sometimes promises of playing time or TV exposure aren’t enough—especially when your competitors are offering the same things, only more and better. Though the Mustangs weren’t caught till a decade after Meyer arrived in Dallas, there’s every reason to suspect SMU and its boosters had been bending the rules for years.

When the other cleat dropped, it dropped hard. The death penalty—part of the “repeat violators” rule in official NCAA parlance—wiped out SMU’s entire 1987 season and forced the Mustangs to cancel their 1988 campaign as well. So, when Lombardi compared the punishment to the nuclear option, in 2002, the analogy seemed like an apt one. For years, scorched earth was all that remained of the SMU football program, and of the idea of paying players.

Now, however, the conversation has changed.

Dallas itself played a major role in the rapid rise and ferocious fall of the Mustangs. By the 1970s, the northern Texas city was a growing metropolis, a hub for businessmen who had recently acquired their fortunes thanks to oil and real estate. Virtually to a man, each had a college football team he supported, and with that support came an intense sense of pride, not to mention competition. Combine that environment with the enormous success of the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys during the 1970s as they assumed the title of “America’s team,” and it’s easy to see how so much pressure was placed on SMU.

With Ron Meyer’s arrival at the university, the goal became to dovetail the success of the Cowboys with the Mustangs’ performance—and he fit right in with the image that Dallas had begun to embody. He was brash, he was charming, he was dapper; the comparisons with Dallas’ J.R. Ewing came all too easily. And like Ewing, Meyer could be ruthless, pursuing recruits throughout eastern Texas with near-mythic fervor.

And the best myths have a dragon to slay. For Meyer, that dragon was Eric Dickerson. Dickerson was one of the nation’s top prospects—a high school running back so gifted he could have chosen any school in the country to play for in 1979. By all accounts, SMU wasn’t even in the running. They’d come a long way toward respectability since Meyer had arrived, but still weren’t on a level with Oklahoma or USC or Notre Dame. Plus, Dickerson had already committed to Texas A&M (and famously received a Pontiac Trans-Am that SMU supporters had dubbed the ‘Trans A&M’ right around the same time). But then, suddenly, miraculously, Dickerson had a change of heart. He decommitted from A&M and picked SMU shortly thereafter.

To this day, that decision remains a mystery wrapped in an enigma. There’s a section of ESPN 30 for 30’s excellent documentary about the SMU scandal, The Pony Exce$$—a riff on the SMU backfield, Dickerson and classmate Craig James, which was dubbed ‘The Pony Express’—about Dickerson’s recruiting process. No one involved, from Meyer to the boosters to Dickerson himself, would say how he really ended up at SMU. But none of them were able to contain the smirks that crept across their faces when they talked about the coup. There’s a reason that a popular sports joke in the early ’80s was that Dickerson took a pay-cut when he graduated and went to the NFL.

Dickerson changed everything for the Mustangs. With him powering SMU’s vaunted offense, the team became a force to be reckoned with in the Southwest Conference. Greater success, however, brought with it greater scrutiny. SMU was in a difficult position because Dallas had such a vibrant and competitive sports media scene (led by the Dallas Morning News and the Dallas Times Herald) at the time—one increasingly focused on investigative journalism in the wake of Watergate. The school’s status as a relative neophyte in the world of big-time college football and lack of rapport with the NCAA also did them no favors. There’s little question that other programs in the Southwest Conference were engaged in recruiting practices that bent the rules when it was possible, but none had quite as many eyes on them as the Mustangs.

Bobby Collins took over in 1982 and led SMU to its undefeated season, after Meyer left to be head coach of the hapless New England Patriots, but the Mustangs would never again reach those dizzying heights. Despite a growing recruiting reach, Collins failed to lure top-caliber prospects to Dallas, even with the help of the program’s increasingly notorious group of boosters. Instead, SMU became better known for its damning misfires, the first of which was Sean Stopperich, a prep star from Pittsburgh. Stopperich was paid $5,000 to commit and moved his family to Texas, but SMU had failed to realize that Stopperich’s career as a useful football player was already over. The offensive lineman had blown out his knee in high school, spent little time on the field for the Mustangs and left the university after just one year. Upon his departure from SMU, Stopperich became the first key witness for the NCAA in its pursuit of SMU.

The first round of penalties came down in 1985, banning SMU from bowl games for two seasons and stripping the program of 45 scholarships over a two-year period. At the time, those were considered some of the harshest sanctions in NCAA history. In response, Bill Clements, chairman of the board of governors for SMU, hung a group of the school’s boosters—dubbed the “Naughty Nine” by the media—out to dry, blaming them for the program’s infractions and the university’s sullied reputations.

Shortly thereafter, the NCAA convened a special meeting to discuss new, harsher rules for cheating, the most severe of which was the death penalty. (Despite Texas’ reputation as a pro-death penalty state for felons, its universities were some of the new rules’ staunchest opponents.) Still, due to the sanction’s power, few believed it would ever be used.

If SMU had cut off its payments to players immediately, it might not have been. Instead, the school and its boosters implemented a “phase-out” plan, which meant they would continue paying the dozen or so athletes to whom they had promised money until their graduation. One of those students-athletes, David Stanley, came forward after being kicked off the team and gave a televised interview outlining the improper benefits he had received from SMU. His words alone may not have been enough to damn the university, but an appearance on Dallas’ ABC affiliate, WFAA, by Coach Collins, athletic director Bob Hitch and recruiting coordinator Henry Lee Parker sealed the program’s fate.

Their interview with WFAA’s sports director Dale Hansen is a mesmerizing watch. Hansen sets a beautiful trap for Parker involving a letter that the recruiting director had initialed, and the recruiting coordinator walks right into it, all but proving that payments to players came directly from the recruiting office. The fact that Parker, Collins and Hitch looked uncomfortably guilty the entire time didn’t help their case.

The NCAA continued gathering evidence, and on Feb. 25, 1987—a gray, drizzly day in Dallas—it announced it would be giving SMU the death penalty. The man who made the announcement, the NCAA Director of Enforcement David Berst, fainted moments after handing down the sentence, in full view of the assembled media. SMU football, for all intents and purposes, was dead. The team managed just one winning season from 1989 to 2008, in no small part because the rest of the university community had decided it wanted nothing to do with a program that had brought so much infamy to the school.

The initial reaction to the penalty—both in Dallas and throughout the country—was one of shock. The Mustangs had gone from undefeated to non-existent in just five years. Few, however, could deny that if the NCAA were going to have a death penalty, then SMU was certainly deserving of it. But the fallout from the penalty was worse than anticipated; perhaps not coincidentally, in the decades since 1987, the penalty has never once been used against a Division I school.

Over the last two decades, the conversation that surrounded SMU’s fall from grace has changed even more. These days, those in and around the world of college sports don’t talk much about what the penalties for paying players should be; instead, many are wondering whether there should be any penalty at all for paying college athletes. The arguments in favor of paying college athletes are manifold, especially considering they often generate millions on behalf of their universities. Few, however, would argue that players should be paid in secret (or while still in high school). Any sort of pecuniary compensation that student-athletes receive would, as in pro sports, require some sort of regulation.

Despite the recent groundswell of support, the NCAA appears reluctant to change its rules. At some point, the governing body of college sports may not have a choice, especially if wants to avoid further legal trouble.

Ron Meyer, the SMU coach who nabbed Eric Dickerson more than 25 years ago, would famously walk into high schools throughout Texas and pin his business card to the biggest bulletin board he could find. Stuck behind it would be a $100 bill. That sort of shenanigan may not be the future of college sports, but we may be getting closer to the day when money isn’t a four-letter word for student-athletes.

Read TIME’s 2013 cover story about the ongoing debate over paying college athletes, here in the TIME Vault: It’s Time to Pay College Athletes

TIME Sports

See Photos of Fast and Furious Drag Racers from the 1950s

In the wake of last weekend's Daytona 500, LIFE looks back at the hot rods and drag racers of the Rebel Without a Cause era

The squirrel batched out past his competitors, nerfing an A-bomb and pruning a T-bone on his way to top eliminator, moments before the badge bandits arrived on the scene. So might have gone a description of a drag race in the 1950s, at least according to the “Dictionary of Drag Racing Jargon” LIFE published in 1957.

Drag racing has always been NASCAR’s rebellious cousin, Hollywood’s prolific mining of the sport for high-speed drama (Fast and Furious one through seven, for starters) would have outsiders believe. In its earliest years, races were held stoplight-to-stoplight, or until the sound of sirens prompted drivers to disperse. The sport LIFE profiled in the late 1950s, however, looked less like the revved-up teenagers of Rebel Without a Cause and more like a maturing young adult trying to be taken seriously.

The National Hot Rod Association and the Automobile Timing Association of America, founded just a few years after NASCAR in 1951 and 1956, respectively, were taking pains to distance themselves from the popular view of drag racing as “a postwar teen-age infatuation with souped-up cars in which speed-crazy kids raced surreptitiously at 80 or 90 mph over lonely roads.” Local clubs with names like the Dragons and the Road Lords divided their attention between perfecting hot rods for races and waging a public relations campaign to improve public opinion of their sport.

Drag racing clubs got involved with civic projects to curry good favor in their communities. They liaised with local police and disciplined drivers who practiced their lead-footed habits outside of officially sanctioned racing strips. They disapproved of illegal street racing as fervently as the law enforcement that aimed to shut it down, as it cast a negative light on the sport as a whole.

The future of the sport was in question, as national coalitions of police chiefs voiced disapproval and the National Safety Council announced its official stance against drag racing. Sponsors pulled out, and supporters found themselves grasping at statistics to try to disprove correlations between the sport and traffic fatalities.

The photos that accompanied LIFE’s 1957 cover story offered an antidote to the after-hours danger many people associated with drag racing. Held in broad daylight with sharply dressed drivers and support teams, the races were a far cry from the stuff of James Dean, helping to bolster the sport’s legitimacy among a skeptical population.

Sixty years later, the NHRA claims 80,000 members, 140 tracks and 5,000 annual events. Attendance and viewership pale in comparison to NASCAR, which is second only to the NFL in television viewership. But its adherents remain a dedicated bunch, and its box office potential nearly, but apparently not entirely, exhausted.

Liz Ronk, who edited this gallery, is the Photo Editor for LIFE.com. Follow her on Twitter at @LizabethRonk.

TIME celebrities

Michael Phelps Just Got Engaged to Former Miss California USA

Subway Press Conference With Pele And Michael Phelps
Rafael Neddermeyer—Getty Images Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps attends a Subway press conference to promote healthy living and lifestyle among childrenon December 04, 2013 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The Olympic champion is taking the plunge

Olympic champion Michael Phelps is engaged to girlfriend Nicole Johnson, the swimmer announced on Instagram Sunday.

The 22-time Olympic medalist posted a photo of the couple lying in the snow with the caption, “She said yes.” Johnson posted a similar photo to her Instagram with with the caption “I’m gonna be a Mrs.”

The couple began dating in 2009 but broke up in 2012 before getting back together, according to Page Six. Johnson was Miss California USA 2010.

She said yes😁😁😁 @nicole.m.johnson. (Photo credit to @arschmitty )

A photo posted by Michael Phelps (@m_phelps00) on

I'm gonna be a Mrs. 🙊🙈 @m_phelps00 💍❤️ 📷: @arschmitty

A photo posted by Nicole Michele (@nicole.m.johnson) on

TIME NASCAR

Kurt Busch Won’t Race Daytona 500 After Domestic Abuse Ruling

The driver lost his final appeal to overturn NASCAR's ban

NASCAR driver Kurt Busch lost an appeal late Saturday to overturn an indefinite suspension from the sport on the eve of the Daytona 500. The punishment was levied on Friday in response to a finding by a Delaware family court that the driver had committed an act of domestic violence.

“Kurt Busch now has exhausted his appeal options under the NASCAR rulebook, and the indefinite suspension remains in effect,” NASCAR said in a statement. The decision means Busch won’t be able to race in Sunday’s Daytona 500.

The organization said that Busch would need to undergo treatment and win its approval before returning to the race track. Busch vowed to continue fighting the decision through an attorney.

“We are unhappy with the latest decision to deny our re-appeal, but we will continue to exhaust every procedural and legal remedy we have available to us until Kurt Busch is vindicated,” said Busch’s attorney Rusty Hardin.

[ESPN]

TIME celebrities

Jon Stewart Threatens WWE Star With ‘World of Hurt’

'Daily Show' star says he'll bring the pain to Seth Rollins

Wrestling star Seth Rollins messed with the wrong late night television host.

A little backstory: Earlier this week, Rollins boasted that he was the most talented man in World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), or a future candidate for John Oliver’s “How is this still a thing” segment. The wrestling star, whose signature move is the “curb stomp,” said he was so good he could take his talents to the White House. Hell, he said he could even replace Jon Stewart when he departs the Daily Show.

His exact words: “I could take over as host of the Daily Show and make that thing actually watchable.” Burn.

Well, Stewart isn’t taking the threat lying down. In a video posted on Youtube, Stewart had this to say in response to Rollins: “Coming after the Daily Show, you just stepped in a world of hurt, my friend.”

“I’m coming for you Rollins. One hundred and sixty pounds of dynamite.”

Well, maybe not dynamite.

“My bone density isn’t what it used to be,” Stewart says. “160 pounds of wood…like a soft wood. Like a pine.”

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser