TIME Television

TLC Should Cancel 19 Kids and Counting

The reality show has been selling a sanctimonious sham

It’s time for TLC to get out of the Duggar business.

On Thursday Josh Duggar, eldest son of the giant clan in TLC’s 19 Kids and Counting, admitted “act[ing] inexcusably” following the revelation of charges that he molested underage girls, including some of his sisters, when he was a teenager. His confession came after an expose reported by InTouch, which unearthed police records that not only documented the molestation but showed that patriarch Jim Bob Duggar waited more than a year before contacting police. Josh Duggar also resigned as executive director of the Family Research Council, a socially conservative advocacy group.

And TLC? It hasn’t announced any decision on the show’s future. (As I write, it’s replaced a daytime rerun of the show with The Little Couple.) Josh may be paying some price. But TLC also needs to stop collecting a price from a lucrative franchise that has turned out to be a sanctimonious sham.

This is not about TV networks having an obligation to exact punishments that the justice system didn’t. TLC, Discovery and every other media corporation are not legal authorities, and I don’t especially want media executives responsible for meting out justice.

They are, however, responsible for the programming they put on. And what TLC has been putting on the air since 2008 with the Duggar family is, simply, a moral fraud.

That may not be TLC’s fault—the incidents predate the show’s premiere—but it is TLC’s problem. 19 Kids is not just about the wacky logistics of running a really, really big family. It’s social advocacy, about the Duggars setting themselves up as a moral and religious example, espousing conservative Christian values and withdrawal from the wickedness of larger society—homeschooling, limiting media intake—as a means of raising Godly children. They set themselves up as a model, and implicitly or explicitly criticized other ways of life—even before you get to the family’s extracurricular political endorsements, judgment of gay couples, and involvement with organizations whose missions are to tell the rest of us how to live.

Nobody’s perfect. But child molesting is a much bigger imperfection than most, one that the show’s audience deserved to know about. That the family kept the whole truth from us and set themselves up as paragons of childrearing and decency is morally dishonest. It’s not just an insult to people who don’t share their religious and cultural beliefs. It’s an offense to all the people who fervently do.

Maybe those believers are willing to put this behind them. Maybe they feel, genuinely, that the family has suffered and want to support it. And it will be tempting for TLC to leave it at that and leave a valuable franchise on the air. (That wasn’t enough to save Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, the onetime phenomenon TLC canceled after reports that matriarch Mama June was dating a convicted child molester.)

It has no excuse to. Maybe Josh Duggar is truly remorseful, maybe not. That’s for people to decide themselves. And it may be that the show’s fans—or even non-fans—may decide to forgive his actions and his family’s inactions. That’s a personal decision. As a moral principle, judge-not-lest-ye-be-judged is admirable. But as a business principle, it means being able to do anything, to do business with anyone, and profit from it anyway.

Maybe TLC couldn’t help that the Duggars’ hypocrisy got on the air. But it can make sure that it doesn’t go on making money from it.

Read next: Arkansas Police Destroy Record of Josh Duggar Investigation

TIME Television

Rumer Willis on Her Dancing with the Stars Win: ‘I Had the Time of My Life’

RUMER WILLIS, VALENTIN CHMERKOVSKIY
Craig Sjodin—ABC DANCING WITH THE STARS - RUMER WILLIS AND VALENTIN CHMERKOVSKIY - The 10th anniversary celebrity cast of "Dancing with the Stars" is strapping on their ballroom shoes and getting ready for their first dance on MONDAY, MARCH 16 (8:00-10:01 p.m., ET) on the ABC Television Network. Rumer Willis is partnered with Valentin Chmerkovskiy. (ABC/Craig Sjodin)

Willis heads out with her partner, Val Chmerkovskiy, on the Dancing With the Stars tour

After over three months of competition, Rumer Willis and Val Chmerkovskiy won Dancing with the Stars on Tuesday night, besting Noah Galloway and Riker Lynch for the victory. “It was incredible,” Chmerkovskiy tells TIME. It was his fourth time to the final round of the competitive reality show, but the first time he won the show’s gaudy Mirror Ball trophy. “I had been waiting for this moment for a very long time,” he says.

While Chmerkovskiy’s victory was a long time coming, one thing he wasn’t expecting was the actual weight of the trophy. “It’s pretty heavy,” says Willis. “We weighed it and it’s about 25 pounds!”

“It doesn’t sound like much, but in the middle of the celebration, they hand you this 25 pound rock,” Chmerkovskiy laughs. “I thought the trophy was going to be lighter. I had all these plans to wave it over my head, but no.”

As for where to store that heavy Mirror Ball, they have different approaches. “I haven’t found a great spot for it yet,” says Willis. “I’m treating my trophy like the Stanley Cup,” says Chmerkovskiy. “I’m taking it everywhere with me. All my friends are in New York, so I have it with me now on a trophy tour.”

As to how they won those trophies, they agree that it was all thanks to the fans. “We had a great group of fans who supported us from the beginning, and they are the reason we won,” says Willis. “They were out there every week voting for us and gathering support. It was awesome.” Willis’s Hollywood lineage and support system didn’t hurt in getting out the votes, either. Her parents—Bruce Willis and Demi Moore—were fixtures in the audience of the show and Willis’s friends like Miley Cyrus, Courtney Love, Zendaya, and even Moore’s ex, Ashton Kutcher, were all tweeting their support for the star during the course of the competition. After she won, so many people called and texted to congratulate her, her phone broke. “It just died,” laughs Willis. “I had to get it fixed in New York.”

While Willis was hesitant to comment on her famous friends, Chmerkovskiy thought it was great to have such well-known supporters. “For me it was incredible to experience that,” he says. “But to be completely honest, it was the anonymous fans, who aren’t famous, who spend their entire season making fan art, and voting for us—those people mean so much to us.”

After the rigors of the competition, the duo hasn’t had much of a chance to take some time off yet. “We had to get on a plane to New York and head straight to Good Morning America and The View,” says Willis. “Now I think we’re going to take a little break.”

The whirlwind of events means that the reality of having won—and the realization that the show and its time commitment are over—hasn’t quite set in yet. “It’s still a little hard to grasp it. It feels really surreal,” says Willis. “I don’t think people realize how unusual the whole process is,” says Chmerkovskiy. “You get together, strangers, and from that moment on you spend every single day together for the next three months. And then overnight, it’s over. It’s very surreal. It’s going to take time to adjust to regular life. I’m going on tour. My dancing doesn’t stop, but she’s taking a slow and steady descent from Dancing with the Stars.

Not that Willis is done dancing. “I’m going to do a couple of dates with the Dancing with the Stars tour, which I’m really excited about,” she says. “I’m also going to be in a show that Val is putting together with his family called Sway, which I’m really excited about. It’s going to be in New York on June 5 and 6 at the Hammerstein Ballroom.”

“Now that we’ve won, I can’t wait to do this tour,” says Chmerkovskiy. “The [Dancing with the Stars] tour is a great way to meet the fans. We have 60 shows in 40 cities and I’m really excited, because these are the people who supported me on the show and support the show in general.”

While Willis wants to focus on her singing—not dancing—career (she and Chmerkovskiy danced to her cover of Britney Spears’s “Toxic” during the finale), she says she loved her time on Dancing with the Stars. “I think the whole experience was really special. It’s an incredible journey. I don’t think you can describe what an intense and unique experience it is,” says Willis. “I had the time of my life.”

TIME fashion

This Is How Mad Men Changed the Way We Dress

Lee Garner Jr. (Darren Pettie) and Pete Campbell (Vincent Kartheiser) - Mad Men - Season 3,  Episode 9 - Photo Credit: Carin Baer/AMC
Carin Baer / AMC Lee Garner Jr. (Darren Pettie) and Pete Campbell (Vincent Kartheiser) in Mad Men

Suit sales have surged since 1998

While Mad Men may be over, its effect on menswear will no doubt live on in the U.S. and abroad. The show has long been charged with inspiring a fashion trend for men and women harkening back to the show’s 1960s setting. In a recent article, The Guardian said the Mad Men effect is very real. In fact, when the show began eight years ago, menswear was already seeing a surge in sales. Between 1998 and 2014, for example, suit sales doubles in the U.S.

Quartz, too, reported on the fashion effect inspired by the show. Tailored articles of men’s clothing sells for $4.8 billion each year, Quartz said, citing data from NPD Group. In fact, some of the biggest fashion brands, such as J. Crew, used the show as inspiration for new lines. Per the article:

Mad Men‘s brilliant costume design helped fuel that demand. It bred obsession among menswear publications, such as GQ, and created a crowd of guys wanting to emulate Draper’s dapper look. And then J.Crew stepped in to satisfy it, in the form of its slim-cut Ludlow suit.

The Guardian, meanwhile, characterized the men’s fashion that appears on the show as follows:

  • Michael Ginsberg embodied the style plate, or extroverted fashion sense
  • Don Draper was the traditionalist, or the person who sticks with what he already enjoys
  • Pete Campbell served as the old soul, or the man who dresses in older fashions
  • Roger Sterling was the rake, or the person inspired by fun menswear
  • Stan Rizzo dressed as the rebel, or the casual dresser

For the full list and explanations from the newspaper, see here.

Interestingly, Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner explained the premise behind the 1971 Coca-Cola ad that played in the show’s final minutes in a recent interview.

TIME Television

A Gilmore Girls Reunion Could Be Heading Our Way

Gilmore Girls
Warner Bros./Getty Images Lauren Graham as Lorelai and Alexis Bledel as Rory in Gilmore Girls

Scott Patterson just hinted that dreams may come true in Stars Hollow

Scott Patterson a.k.a. Luke Danes, a.k.a. Mr. Right or Mr. Wrong depending on your feelings about Lorelei’s relationships, just dropped some serious hints about a possible Gilmore Girls reunion.

Patterson stopped by the Gilmore Guys podcast and hinted that fans might soon get to see a cast reunion from the beloved show. “I will say this, there are talks going on at the moment,” Patterson said, before clamming up. “I can’t really go into any details, but there is some activity. I’m hopeful, and I’m in. I think it would be a big event, and I think it would be a great fan celebration.”

Did Patterson mean that Rory (Alexis Bledel) and Lorelei (Lauren Graham) would be heading back to Stars Hollow? Or was Patterson just reminding fans that the cast will be reuniting next month at the ATX Television Festival in Texas? It will be a big reunion with Patterson, Graham, Bledel expected to be joined by Kelly Bishop, Danny Strong, Todd Lowe, Jackson Douglas, Matt Czuchry and more. Also on hand will be Jared Padelecki, who played Dean. (In the podcast, Patterson revealed that he is firmly on Team Dean, even though he played the uncle of rival love interest Jess on the show.)

To fully parse Patterson’s statements for clues, listen to his full interview on the podcast on iTunes.

TIME Viral Videos

Watch The Kardashians and The Real Housewives Get the Bad Lip Reading Treatment

Thank Red Nose Day for this

Kourtney Kardashian really wants to share her fish sticks with her sister, Kim. At least according to a bad lip reading of their conversation courtesy of Red Nose Day. Of course they weren’t the only members of the Keeping Up With the Kardashian crew saying strange things in the clip above.

“I put weird stuff in my ear,” “said” Bruce Jenner, according to the expert lip readers used in the video. “Like what?” asked Kris Jenner. “Like Doritos,” Bruce Jenner replied. “That’s where you put it,” Kris replied matter-of-factly.

Other highlights of the poorly interpreted conversations include Real Housewives stars NeNe Leakes, Kim Richards, and more talking nonsense (well, more nonsense than usual).

It’s all good fun for a good cause. Specifically, Red Nose Day a fundraising event that just debuted in the United States, decades after it launched in the U.K. in 1985. The special, which aired on NBC on Thursday, also featured the likes of Julia Roberts, Will Ferrell, Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon, Jodie Foster, Jimmy Fallon, Neil Patrick Harris, Coldplay, Julianne Moore and the cast of Game of Thrones. And, of course, The Real Housewives.

TIME Television

Who Are the Duggars? Meet the 19 Kids and Counting Family

Josh Duggar's molestation allegations are casting his famous family in a new light

Fans of TLC’s 19 Kids and Counting series were surprised Thursday when news broke that Josh Duggar admitted to having molested five girls when he was a teenager. The eldest son of the Duggar family promptly resigned from his position with the conservative Christian lobbying organization Family Research Council, noting that he regretted bringing the group “negative attention.”

But for those unfamiliar with the TLC program and the Duggar family, the news prompted a few questions about this unconventional clan.

So who are the Duggars?

The Duggars are an Arkansas family consisting, like the show’s title suggests, of 19 kids (and counting). The patriarch, Jim Bob Duggar, 49, and matriarch, Michelle Duggar, 48, have been married since 1984. They have 10 sons and nine daughters, several of whom are now married themselves. All 19 have names that begin with the letter “J”: Joshua, Jana and John-David (who are twins), Jill, Jessa, Jinger, Joseph, Josiah, Joy-Anna, Jedidiah and Jeremiah (also twins), Jason, James, Justin, Jackson, Johannah, Jennifer, Jordyn-Grace and Josie.

Why so many children?

Jim Bob and Michelle say they used birth control for a time when they first got married, then had Joshua, but went back on the pill after. Michelle nevertheless became pregnant, but miscarried. After that, they decided never to use birth control again, reinforcing their conservative Christian values. Their children are homeschooled, maintain modest dress and avoid sources of entertainment their parents deem inappropriate. When Jessa married in a recent special on the show, she and her husband shared their first kiss on their wedding day.

How do they look after all of them?

The family uses a “buddy system” in which an older child is assigned a younger child to look after, taking care of tasks like tying shoes, choosing outfits and helping out with homework.

What’s Josh’s role in the family?

Josh, 27, is the eldest son of the family. His wife Anna and their three children (all with “M” names) are featured on the show. Anna is pregnant again, with a baby girl who is due in July.

What’s next for the family?

TLC hasn’t yet issued a statement on the future of 19 Kids and Counting (the network previously pulled the plug on Here Comes Honey Boo Boo after the mother in that reality show rekindled a romance with a convicted child molester). Jim Bob and Michelle gave a statement to PEOPLE saying, “We pray that as people watch our lives they see that we are not a perfect family. We have challenges and struggles every day.”

Whether this development can be presented as a story of redemption for the Duggar family remains to be seen.

TIME Television

Watch Bill Murray in a Teaser for Netflix’s A Very Murray Christmas

Spend the holiday season with Bill Murray on Netflix

Have yourself a melancholy little Christmas with Bill Murray.

Netflix released a teaser on Friday for A Very Murray Christmas, which admittedly doesn’t tell us much. Murray, wearing a reindeer headpiece, stares out a window, before turning around, sighing a little and walking away.

If this seems a little like Lost in Translation: The Christmas Special, that may not be that far off. A Very Murray Christmas is co-written and directed by Sofia Coppola, Netflix announced. It’s described as an “an homage to the classic variety show featuring Bill Murray playing himself, as he worries no one will show up to his TV show due to a terrible snow storm in New York City. Through luck and perseverance, guests arrive at the Carlyle hotel to help him; dancing and singing in holiday spirit.”

George Clooney, Amy Poehler, Chris Rock, Maya Rudolph, Jason Schwartzman and Miley Cyrus are among those also appearing in the special.

TIME Television

Hear What Game of Thrones’ Red Wedding Sounds Like as Interpreted by Coldplay

The band joined forces with the cast for NBC's "Red Nose Day"

Coldplay and Game of Thrones both have devoted fan bases. Bring them together and what do you get? A goofy yet adorable musical interpretation of the HBO series that’s sure to be enjoyed by both of their constituencies.

The band teased a musical version of the show’s infamous “red wedding” that, so far, looks a lot less tragic, violent and bloody than the George R.R. Martin version. Still, those “Bum, bum, bum, buppa duppa bums” must be building up to something sinister.

The musical interlude was a part of NBC’s Red Nose Day, a telethon to raise funds for children’s charities that has been a huge success in the U.K. for some 30 years. Coldplay penned several other songs for the event, including a Peter Dinklage piece about his character’s survival on Game of Thrones and a reggae number by Emilia Clarke about being a “Rastafarian Targaryen.” Variety reports that NBC raised more than $10 million in the Thursday broadcast.

TIME Television

Watch Emilia Clarke Sing Reggae About Being Khaleesi

The actress took to the mic for NBC's "Red Nose Day"

We’ve seen Daenerys Targaryen spend time in tropical climates, but this is ridiculous. Game of Thrones actress Emilia Clarke sang a reggae song about being a “Rastafarian Targaryen” as part of NBC’s “Red Nose Day” telethon to raise money for children’s charities.

The clip is a one of several songs penned by Coldplay for a Game of Thrones-themed musical, with other sketches including a song by Peter Dinklage celebrating his character’s longevity on the show.

TIME Television

Watch Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant Reveal Their ‘True’ Voices

The gag was a sketch for NBC's "Red Nose Day"

We’ve come a long way from the days when certain silent movie actors couldn’t keep their careers alive after the arrival of talkies because their voices just didn’t work. But is it possible that some of our favorite actors really do have awful voices and are simply dubbed over to sound more appealing?

That’s the premise of one of NBC’s “Red Nose Day” comedy sketches, featuring Julia Roberts, Hugh Grant, Daniel Craig and Liam Neeson admitting that their voices are very different from what moviegoers have come to expect. Somehow, those romantic scenes in Notting Hill don’t work quite as well without their melodic tones.

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