MONEY Taxes

Congress Delivers a Few Last-Minute Tax Breaks

A last-minute bill restores a break for charitable giving, the sales tax and tuition write-offs, and more.

The U.S. Congress, in its wisdom, waited until the waning weeks of the year to approve some tax breaks that will only be good for 2014.

That means that in some cases, you lost out: it is too late to take advantage of them and you are going to lose them at the end of the year.

But there are a handful of provisions that may benefit some taxpayers who have special situations and can act quickly to lock in their breaks, once President Barack Obama signs the tax extenders bill as he is expected to do soon.

In addition to the usual year-end moves—make your charitable contributions, feed your individual retirement account, take your investment losses—consider this short list of limited-time strategies:

Give away part of your IRA. There is a special situation for people who face mandatory minimum distributions from their retirement accounts, but do not itemize their tax deductions, and as a result, can’t write off charitable contributions. They can avoid taxes on their IRA distribution by transferring it directly to a charity, suggests Greg Rosica, a partner with Ernst & Young.

This provision expires on Dec. 31, however, and it is unclear whether it will be renewed next year. Taxpayers in high tax brackets who do not itemize may want to transfer more than the minimum to get money out of their IRA and cover gifts they would otherwise make in subsequent years: under this rule, you can transfer as much as $100,000. So contact your favorite charity and make sure they can effect the rollover before year-end.

Buy your boat. Congress also extended, just through the end of 2014, the provision that allows taxpayers to deduct their state sales taxes from their taxable income instead of deducting their state income taxes. In places like Florida where there is no state income tax, that is a benefit that can be worth a lot. If you’ve had your finger on the “buy” button for a new boat, car, or other expensive item, you might save significantly by buying it this year, says Rosica, one of the authors of the voluminous EY Tax Guide 2015.

Make a tuition payment. Even people who do not itemize deductions are allowed to write off up to $4,000 in tuition and education expenses if their income falls under certain levels. You may have already spent that much on qualified education costs this year. But if you have not—and you expect to be ponying up for spring semester—make that payment before 2014 ends.

Talk to your human resources department about that commuting benefit. For almost all of 2014, employers operated under the clearly inequitable (and environmentally unfriendly) rule that people who used mass transit could set aside pre-tax income of up to $130 a month for commuting costs, but those who drove to work could set aside $250 a month for parking. Now Congress has equalized those two benefits at $250 per month for all of 2014—but this year alone.

For many workers at large companies, it is too late to get an additional $1,440 taken out of their pay for commuting costs this year. That’s too bad, because it could save some people more than $600 in state, federal and Social Security taxes. If you have a more flexible HR department, go ask for a make-up withdrawal. You could always load your farecard for next year when Congress may go through this exercise again.

MONEY Taxes

How to Keep Stock Gains From Hiking Your Tax Bill

By following a few simple steps, you can make sure gains in your portfolio don't result in a big gain in your tax bill.

MONEY Taxes

10 Last-Minute Ways to Save on Your Taxes This Year

woman donating clothes
Clean out your closet by Dec. 31 and cut your tax bill. JGI/Jamie Grill—Getty Images

In between your holiday shopping and New Year's plans, make time for these time-sensitive tax moves.

You know that the window to finish your holiday shopping is closing fast. Well, so is the time you have to cut your 2014 tax bill. Before you pop open the champagne on New Year’s Eve, make sure you’ve ticked off these valuable tax tasks.

1. Be Charitable Now

Individual Americans donate some $250 billion dollars to charity every year, according to the annual Giving USA report, and December is high season for giving.

By donating to charity, you can trim next your tax bill next April. You must itemize to get a write-off, and the organization must be a qualified charity. Check at IRS.gov.

Then you simply need to get a check in the mail by Dec. 31. Or put the gift on a credit card before year-end and pay the bill in January. Make sure you have a receipt, be it a cancelled check or your credit-card statement. But if you donate $250 or more, you must get a written record from the charity.

If you give away clothes or stuff from around the house, you’ll be able to deduct the fair market value, as long as the goods are in good condition or better.

“The end of the year is a great time to donate some items to charity,” says financial planner Trent Porter. “Your good deed will be rewarded with a bigger tax refund and a clean closet”

2. Be Charitable Later

If you’re in search of a big deduction in 2014, but you’re not ready to support a single charity now, here’s a good option. With as little as $5,000, you can set up a donor advised fund with a brokerage of fund company such as Fidelity or Schwab. You get the upfront tax savings, the money is invested, and you can then donate a portion of the fund to the charities of your choice for years to come.

“These accounts make it easy to use appreciated securities and other assets to fund your philanthropy, thus avoiding paying capital gains tax on the appreciation,” says financial planner Eric Lewis.

3. Invest in Education

A year of tuition and fees at even a public college will cost you more than $23,000 today. You need all the tax breaks you can get.

If you’re saving for school in a 529 college savings plan, that money grows tax-free, and withdrawals are tax-free as long as the money goes toward higher ed.

You can’t deduct those contributions on your federal return. But in 34 states and the District of Columbia, you can qualify for at least a partial deduction or a credit on your state tax return, as long as you fund the account by Dec. 31. Look up your state’s rules at savingforcollege.com.

4. Speed Up Deductions

A popular strategy for cutting your tax bill is to move up as many deductible expenses as you can. This is especially smart if your income will be high this year—say you cashed out winning investments or sold property.

One simple way is to donate more to charity. You can also make your January mortgage payment in December, which will give you extra interest to deduct. You could also prepay your property taxes, or send in estimated state and local taxes that you would otherwise pay in January. Or pay next year’s professional dues and subscriptions to trade publications.

Don’t employ this strategy, however, if you expect to be in a higher tax bracket in 2015. In that case, the deductions will be more valuable to you next year.

5. Top Off Retirement Plans

In 2014, you can save $17,500 in a 401(k) plan, or $23,000 if you’re 50 or older. If you haven’t saved that much, see if your employer will let you make an extra lump-sum contribution before Dec. 31. If you can’t, make sure you hit the max next year by raising your contribution rate now. The limit will rise to $18,000 in 2015, or $24,000 if you’re 50 or older.

You have until next April 15 to fund a traditional or Roth IRA for 2014, but the sooner you save the more time you’ll have to get the benefit of tax-deferred growth. What’s more, planning ahead might make for better investment choices. A recent Vanguard study found that last-minute IRA investors are more likely to simply park the money in cash and leave it there.

You can contribute $5,500 dollars to an IRA in 2014, or $6,500 if you’re 50 or older.

If you run your own business and want to save in a solo 401(k), you must open that plan by Dec. 31, though you can still fund it through next April 15.

6. Look for Losers

Nearly six years into this bull market, long-term stock investors are sitting on big gains. Maybe you cashed in a profitable stock or mutual fund this year. Or you trimmed back your winners when you rebalanced your portfolio. Unless you sold within a retirement account, you’ll face a tax bill come April. And the best way to cut that is to offset your investment gains with investment losses.

By pairing gains with losses, you can avoid paying capital gains taxes. If you have more losses than gains, you can use up to $3,000 worth to offset your ordinary income, and then save the rest of the losses for future years.

However, don’t let tax avoidance get in the way of sound investing. You should sell a stock or fund before year-end because it doesn’t fit with your investing strategy, not just because you have a loss.

If you want to buy the investment back, you must wait 31 days. Do so sooner, and the IRS will disallow the write-off (what’s called the “wash sale” rule).

7. Part With Big Winners

If you donate winning stocks, bonds, or mutual funds directly to a charity, you can enjoy two tax breaks. You won’t owe any taxes on your capital gains. And you can deduct the full market value of the investment on your 2014 return.

8. Tap Your IRA

With a tax-deferred plan like an IRA, once you hit age 70 1/2 you must take out some money every year. You have to take your first distribution by April 1 the year after you turn 70 1/2. Then the annual deadline for your required minimum distribution, or RMD, is Dec. 31.

This rule doesn’t apply to Roth IRAs, and if you have a 401(k) plan and you’re still working, you can usually wait until you do retire to start withdrawing money.

The IRS minimum is based on your account balance at the end of last year and your current life expectancy. Your broker or adviser can help you with the calculation, but you’re responsible for making the withdrawal. If you fail to do so, you’ll owe a 50% penalty on the amount you should have withdrawn.

You can also donate your RMD directly to charity and avoid paying income taxes on the withdrawal. In mid-December, Congress extended that rule, which had expired, for at least one more year.

9. Spread the Wealth

Making outright gifts is a smart move tax-wise, says Ann Arbor financial planner Mo Vidwans. Your heirs are less likely to face estate taxes down the road—and you can help out your kids or grandchildren when they need it the most. In 2014, you can give as many people as you want up to $14,000 tax-free. If both you and your spouse both make gifts, that’s $28,000.

If you’re funding 529 plan, you can frontload five years worth of gifts and put $70,000 into a child’s account now.

10. Pay Taxes Now and Never Again

With a traditional individual retirement account, your contributions are tax deductible, but you’ll owe income taxes on your withdrawals. A Roth IRA is the opposite: You invest after-tax money, but your withdrawals are 100% tax free.

Before year-end, you can convert a traditional IRA to a Roth. You’ll have to pay taxes on the conversion in 2014. But then you’ll never owe taxes on that money again.

Converting to a Roth is an especially smart move if your income was down this year and you’re in a low tax bracket. “If you have a low-income year, do a Roth conversion,” says New York City financial planner Annette Clearwaters. “Whenever I see a tax return with negative taxable income I cringe, because it’s such a wasted opportunity.”

And if you later change your mind, you have until the extended tax-filing deadline next October to switch back to a traditional IRA. Clearwaters recommends undoing any conversion that puts you above the 15% federal tax bracket.

Update: This post was updated to reflect Congress’s extension of the rule allowing for direct charitable donations of RMDs.

MONEY IRAs

The Best Way to Tap Your IRA In Retirement

Ask the Expert Retirement illustration
Robert A. Di Ieso, Jr.

Q: I am 72 years old and subject to mandatory IRA withdrawals. I don’t need all the money for my expenses. What should I do with the leftover money? Jay Kahn, Vienna, VA.

A: You’re in a fortunate position. While there is a real retirement savings crisis for many Americans, there are also people with individual retirement accounts (IRAs) like you who don’t need to tap their nest egg—at least not yet.

Nearly four out of every 10 U.S. households own an IRA, holding more than $5.7 trillion in these accounts, according to a study by the Investment Company Institute. At Vanguard, 20% of investors with an IRA who take a distribution after age 70 ½ put it into another taxable investment account with the company.

The government forces you to start withdrawing your IRA money when you turn 70½ because the IRS wants to collect the income taxes you’ve deferred on the contributions. You must take your first required minimum distribution (RMD) by April of the year after you turn 70½ and by December 31 for subsequent withdrawals.

But there’s no requirement to spend it, and many people like you want to continue to keep growing your money for the future. In that case you have several options, says Tom Mingone, founder and managing partner of Capital Management Group of New York.

First, look at your overall asset allocation and risk tolerance. Add the money to investments where you are underweight, Mingone advises. “You’ll get the most bang for your buck doing that with mutual funds or an exchange traded fund.“

For wealthier investors who are charitably inclined, Mingone recommends doing a direct rollover to a charity. The tax provision would allow you to avoid paying taxes on your RMD by moving it directly from your IRA to a charity. The tax provision expired last year but Congress has extended the rule through 2014 and President Obama is expected to sign it.

You can also gift the money. Putting it into a 529 plan for your grandchildren’s education allows it to grow tax free for many years. Another option is to establish an irrevocable life insurance trust and use the money to pay the premiums. With such a trust, the insurance proceeds won’t be considered part of your estate so your heirs don’t pay taxes on it. “It’s a tax-free, efficient way to leave more to your family,” Mingone says.

Stay away from immediate annuities though. “It’s not that I don’t believe in them, but when you’re already into your 70s, the risk you’ll outlive your capital is diminished,” says Mingone. You’ll be locking in a chunk of money at today’s low interest rates and there’s a shorter period of time to collect. “It’s not a good tradeoff for guaranteed income,” says Mingone.

Beyond investing the extra cash, consider just spending it. Some retirees are reluctant to spend the money they’ve saved for retirement out of fear of running out later on. With retirements that can last 30 years or more, it’s a legitimate worry. “Believe it or not, some people have a hard time spending it down,” says Mingone. But failure to enjoy your hard-earned savings, especially while you are still young enough and in good health to use it, can be a sad outcome too.

If you’ve met all your other financial goals, have some fun. “There’s something to be said for knocking things off the bucket list and enjoying spending your money,” says Mingone.

Update: This story was changed to reflect the Senate passing a bill to extend the IRS rule allowing the direct rollover of an IRA’s required minimum distribution to a charity through 2014.

Do you have a personal finance question for our experts? Write to AskTheExpert@moneymail.com

Read next: How Your Earnings Record Affects Your Social Security

MONEY Taxes

As Gas Prices Go Down, Likelihood of Higher Gas Taxes Goes Up

It's no wonder that many are calling for higher gas taxes lately: Gas prices are the cheapest they've been in years, so a hike in gas taxes is less likely to drive drivers nuts.

Raising taxes is never popular. But if there was ever a way to make a tax increase more palatable to Americans, it would be with a tax hike that didn’t seem like much of a tax hike. Like, say, one that was optimally planned so that even after the tax increase was instituted, the average household wouldn’t feel like it was paying much more out of pocket than it was in the recent past.

Just such a rare opportunity is now upon us. Gas prices have plummeted—dipping under $2 per gallon in some markets, with further decreases likely—and some want to take advantage of the situation by jacking up the gas tax at both the state and federal levels. Depending on how high taxes are raised, drivers might very well still be paying less to fill up than they were a few months or a year ago. So in a way, at least theoretically, this is a tax hike that wouldn’t feel like a typical tax hike.

A recent Washington Post column pointed out that the federal gas tax has been stuck at a flat 18.4¢ since 1993. At the time, the price of a gallon of regular was about $1. “It’s been a generation since gas taxes were increased at all,” Paul Bledsoe, a senior fellow on energy at the German Marshall Fund, told the Post. “So they are incredibly low by historic levels.”

Over the years, many have called for increases to the federal gas tax, which has not kept up with inflation. “Inflation has effectively reduced the [gas] tax rate by about one third” over the last two decades, the nonpartisan Tax Foundation noted earlier this year. Most states have flat gas taxes as well, and critics say the revenues collected are falling well short of what’s needed to address our nation’s crumbling infrastructure. “At the state and local levels, gas taxes cover less than half of state and local transportation spending,” said Tax Foundation economist Joseph Henchman.

Again, there’s nothing really new about calls to raise more funds to fix roads and other infrastructure needs at the national and state levels. What is new, however, is that gas is the cheapest it’s been in years, and that projections indicate per-gallon prices will remain well under $3 indefinitely. Predictions call for a national average of $2.94 per gallon next year, which would be roughly 45¢ less than 2014 and 70¢ less what drivers typically paid in 2012.

Hence the fresh push to raise gas taxes while prices at the pump are inexpensive. As Elaine S. Povich of the Pew Charitable Trusts observed recently:

“Cheap gasoline makes such levies more politically palatable, since consumers are less likely to notice the extra burden when they are filling up.”

It must be noted that while the federal gas tax hasn’t budged in two decades, state gas taxes (and other local taxes that help support roads and infrastructure) have been increased fairly regularly. Pennsylvania, Wyoming, and West Virginia are among the states where gas taxes were hiked this year or last, and discussions are in the works to raise state gas taxes in Iowa, Utah, Michigan, New Jersey, Oregon, and beyond. Data from the American Petroleum Institute shows that nationally, drivers pay an average of 49.28¢ per gallon when state and federal levies are added up.

While it’s unsurprising that environmental supporters and academics such as Mississippi State’s Sid Salter are renewing cries for gas tax hikes while gas prices are cheap, it’s particularly noteworthy that some Republicans seem in favor of tax increases at this opportune moment in time as well.

Last month, U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-SD) actually criticized President Obama for refusing to consider a gas tax increase over the years. “I always thought that was ironic, that he’s willing to raise every other tax,” Thune said to the Rapid City Journal. “And then the one that actually pays for something you can see a direct benefit from, he doesn’t want to talk about it.”

More recently, Congressman Tom Petri (R-WI), who is retiring soon, it must be noted, announced he is sponsoring a bill to raise the federal gas tax by 15¢ to 33¢ by 2013. “No one likes taxes,” Petri said in a Huffington Post interview in early December:

“But the issue is whether we should pay for transportation, or cut back on spending and transportation and have less roads and poorer infrastructure, or borrow it from our kids — debt financing it and hoping someone pays the debt off at a future date. And of those choices, it seems to me that the most responsible long-term approach is to do the thing that is unpopular but necessary.”

It helps that the move won’t be quite as unpopular as it would be had the gas tax hike been introduced back when the average driver was paying $3.50 or $3.75 per gallon.

MONEY IRA

How to Use Your Roth IRA to Buy Foreign Stocks

Investing illustration
Robert A. Di Ieso, Jr.

Q: I would like to invest in foreign stocks and LLPs within my Roth IRA. Do I need to file any special forms at the end of the year? Are there any type of investments within the Roth that would not require a special filing? — Tom

A: Depending on what’s available in your Roth IRA or whether you have a self-directed Roth, there are any number of investments you can own beyond the usual stocks, bonds and funds. But just because you can, doesn’t mean you should.

Let’s start with the question of foreign securities. Assuming you’re able to buy stocks listed on foreign exchanges in your Roth — policies vary from brokerage to brokerage — you will need to file IRS Form 8938 to report these foreign assets, says David Lyon, CEO of Main Street Financial in Chicago.

One way to avoid having to file this paper work, among other headaches, is to stick with foreign stocks that are available to U.S. investors as American Depository Receipts, or ADRs. Most of the largest foreign companies have ADRs, which trade on U.S. exchanges and in U.S. dollars, and don’t require the additional paperwork, though there may be other tax considerations.

As always, consider how any such holdings fit into the bigger picture of your portfolio. By all means, you want exposure abroad, but buying individual securities on your own, a la carte, may not yield the best results over the long run.

To wit, a much easier way to gain exposure to foreign companies is via an exchange-traded fund or mutual fund that invests in foreign stocks on your behalf, says Lyon. For broad market exposure, he likes the Vanguard FTSE All-World ex-U.S. ETF (ticker: VEU). As the name indicates, this low-cost fund gives you broad, diversified global exposure, ranging from the developed markets of Europe and Japan to emerging markets in Asia, Latin America and the Middle East.

If you’re looking for a more targeted approach, you can find ETFs that specialize in just one sector of the global economy, or one region of the world, or even one country.

Similarly, if you hold a limited liability partnership (LLP) in your Roth IRA you will need to fill out Form 990-T for unrelated business taxable income.

That said, you probably don’t want to invest Roth IRA assets in an LLP. The reason: “Essentially you’ll be taxed twice,” says Lyon. In addition to first paying tax on the contributions you make to the Roth, he says, you will be taxed on LLP income above $1,000 a year. He adds: “Investors are typically better off focusing their investable assets in traditional investments that allow them to take full advantage of the tax deferred growth and tax free distributions.”

 

MONEY Social Security

6 Things You Need to Know About Social Security Benefits in 2015

knife cutting dollar bill
David Franklin

Make sure you're on course to get as much in Social Security benefits as possible both in 2015 and beyond.

Anyone who has ever taken a look at their Social Security planning knows how complex the program can be. With a huge number of variables involved in calculating your benefits, it can be a huge challenge to estimate exactly what you’ll receive when you decide to retire. But that doesn’t mean you should give up on trying to figure out what Social Security is likely to mean for you. To help simplify your planning, below you’ll find six key numbers related to Social Security in 2015 that everyone should know about.

1. Social Security tax wage limit: $118,500

Wage earners pay 6.2% of their earnings in the form of Social Security taxes, with employers matching that amount out of their own pocket. Self-employed individuals pay both halves of the tax, adding up to a 12.4% rate. But the Social Security tax only applies up to a certain wage limit, and benefits are therefore calculated based on those maximum taxed earnings, rather than your actual income for a given year. Each year, that number rises with the increase in the national average wage index, so 2015’s rise of $1,500 represents about a 1.3% gain from last year’s figure. As a result, the maximum amount of Social Security taxes that employees could pay will rise by $93 to $7,347 for those at or above the wage limit.

2. Cost-of-living increase for Social Security benefits: 1.7%

Each year, Social Security benefits are adjusted to reflect changes in the cost of living. Over the past year, the relevant measure of inflation rose 1.7%, defining the rise in Social Security benefits that will take effect in January 2015. The change makes 2015 the third year in a row that Social Security recipients will see a rise of less than 2% in their benefits, as tepid levels of inflation have held back the cost-of-living adjustment from its typical higher level.

3. Earnings required to receive one coverage credit: $1,220

In order to receive retirement benefits, you need to earn 40 coverage credits over the course of your career. Each year, you can earn a maximum of four credits, and the amount of income you need each year rises according to changes in wages. The 2015 figure is up $20 from 2014, so as long as you make $4,880 or more in 2015, you’ll get the full four credits available and get that much closer to locking in your Social Security benefit eligibility.

4. Maximum monthly benefit for worker retiring at full retirement age: $2,663

The most that you can receive from Social Security is based on work histories that have the maximum taxable earnings for at least 35 years during a worker’s career. Because Social Security benefits are progressive, increases in maximum earnings don’t translate to proportional increases in the monthly payments that retirees receive. The 2015 figure is $21 higher than the $2,642 maximum for 2014. For those who choose to wait beyond retirement age to claim benefits, though, additional amounts are still available: Delayed-retirement credits amount to an extra 8% in benefits per year beyond full retirement age.

5. Average monthly Social Security benefit for retired workers: $1,328

Most workers don’t come close to receiving the maximum amount of Social Security benefits possible. The average monthly benefit expected in January 2015 amounts to just less than half of the maximum. That’s up $34 from the $1,294 average of January 2014, reflecting both the 1.7% cost-of-living adjustment and changes in the typical work history for those receiving benefits in 2015.

6. Maximum amount those under full retirement age can earn in wages and salaries without forfeiting benefits: $15,720

Those who take Social Security early have limits imposed on their benefits if they continue to work. Specifically, those who earn more than a certain threshold have their benefits reduced, losing $1 in benefits for every $2 they earn above the limit. For 2015, that limit is $15,720, up $240 from the 2014 figure.

Losing benefits isn’t necessarily as bad as you think, because for each month in which benefits are eliminated, the Social Security Administration will essentially treat you as though you had started getting benefits a month later than you actually did. That will pump up your future monthly benefit amount, helping to offset the money that was taken away from you.

Understanding the ins and outs of Social Security can be a mind-boggling challenge. But by keeping these simple numbers in mind, you can get the basics of what the program will give you when you retire and make sure you’re on course to get as much in Social Security benefits as possible both in 2015 and beyond.

MONEY Taxes

9 Rules for Tax-Smart Charitable Giving

donating money to box
Jeffrey Coolidge—Getty Images

When you support a good cause, make sure you also get the tax benefits you deserve.

Year-end is peak charitable giving season. To make sure your generosity pays off on next April’s tax return, know the rules for writing off your donations.

You have to itemize deductions. Sorry, but if you take the standard deduction, you can’t write off your gifts to charity on top of that.

You need to give to a legit charity. To check if a nonprofit is a qualified charity in the eyes of the Internal Revenue Service, use the IRS’s Select Check tool. You can also deduct donations to your church, synagogue, mosque, or temple.

You can donate right down to the wire. For a gift to qualify for a deduction, you simply need to get your check in the mail by December 31. Need more time? You can put your gift on a credit card before year-end and then pay the bill in January. (Keep in mind, though, that when you pay by credit card, processing fees may reduce the value of your gift.)

You should save your backup. Make sure you have a receipt for your gift. A cancelled check or credit card statement may be enough. But if you make a donation worth $250 or more, you must get a written acknowledgment from the charity.

Your time can be worth money. As a volunteer, you can’t deduct the value of your time. But you can deduct 14¢ for every mile you drive as part of your volunteer work, so keep track.

You shouldn’t take credit for giving away actual junk. If you donate clothes or household items, you’ll be able to deduct the fair market value—as long as the items are in good condition or better. Keep any paperwork you have for valuable items, and take photos of your donations for your records. It’s up to you, not the charity, to assign a value to your stuff. To do that, you can use thrift store guides published by the Salvation Army, Goodwill, and others, or the ItsDeductible app.

You can’t inflate the value of your old car. When you donate your old wheels to charity, your deduction is generally limited to what the nonprofit brings in by selling your car, not the Kelley Blue Book value. Plus, when you donate a car or other property worth more than $500, you’ll need to file IRS Form 8283.

You can get two tax breaks if you donate winning investments. Another way to save on taxes is to give highly appreciated stocks, bonds, or mutual funds directly to a charity. You won’t owe any taxes on your capital gains. And you can deduct the full market value of the investment as a charitable gift.

You can contribute a big sum now and give it away later. If you open what’s called a donor-advised fund, you can deduct the entire gift on your 2014 tax return and parcel out the money to good causes later. With as little as $5,000, you can open a donor-advised fund at firms such as Fidelity or Schwab.

More tax tips from MONEY 101:
When does it makes sense to itemize?
What kind of expenses can I write off if I’m self-employed?
How can I reduce my tax bill?

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