TIME tanzania

The Grim Reason Tanzania Has Decided to Ban Witchdoctors

TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY JEAN-MARC MOJON
Tony Karumba—AFP/Getty Images Albino children study on January 28, 2009 at the Mitindo Primary School for the blind, which has become a rare sanctuary for albino children.

Around 70 albinos have been murdered in the past three years in order to harvest their body parts

Tanzania instituted a nationwide ban on witchdoctors this week in a move to protect albino citizens.

Witchdoctors commonly believe that body parts of people with albinism — a condition that represents the lack of a particular pigment in the skin — bring good luck and wealth, prompting several attacks on albinos recently.

The country’s Home Affairs Minister Mathias Chikawe said any practicing witchdoctors will henceforth be arrested and taken to court, the BBC reports.

Around 70 albinos have been murdered in the past three years, but only 10 people have been convicted over the killings.

[BBC]

TIME HIV/AIDS

African Countries Should Spend More in AIDS Response, Study Says

A mother holds the hand of her Aids stricken son in Rakai, Ugand
Getty Images

To meet AIDS eradication goals, study says funding should be re-allocated

Twelve African countries with the highest prevalence of HIV/AIDS are currently the largest recipients of international AIDS funding. But it’s now possible for many of them to make domestic spending on the disease a priority, a new study says.

As countries in sub-Saharan Africa gain better financial footing, funds from donor countries are tightening. Researchers from Harvard School of Public Health and the Results for Development Institute decided to test a couple of scenarios to see whether funding for the AIDS response could be re-allocated so African countries would finance a greater share.

Their results, published in the journal The Lancet Global Health, show that overall, the 12 countries—Botswana, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia—could provide a greater share of the costs of AIDS programs in their countries over the next five years. However, several countries will still need support from donors, even if they were to provide their maximum funds.

MORE: The End of AIDS

By looking at factors like expected growth and total government spending, and then comparing them to the countries’ AIDS needs, the researchers found that in most scenarios, AIDS expenditures for three of the upper-middle-income countries (Botswana, Namibia and South Africa) exceed their needs. In many cases, they found, these three countries could actually fund their needs solely from domestic resources. Other low-income countries like Mozambique and Ethiopia would still need to largely rely on donors.

Currently, the dozen countries are home to more than 50% of AIDS cases worldwide, as well as 56% of financial aid for the disease. They also account for 83% of funding from the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), which makes up one of the largest shares of international donations. In 2014, the United Nations program UNAIDS estimated that a “fast-tracked” response to ending the AIDS epidemic would mean we’d need $35 billion each year by 202o, but in 2012, only $19 billion was available and almost half came from international sources. To meet such goals, the researchers suggest their new funding strategy.

Almost none of the 12 countries meet possible financing benchmarks that the study authors believe to be reasonable. If the countries spent more domestically, researchers say that self-funding could increase 2.5 times and could cover 64% of future needs. That would still leave a gap of about $7.9 billion.

“Coupled with improved resource tracking, such metrics could enhance transparency and accountability for efficient use of money and maximize the effect of available funding to prevent HIV infections and save lives,” the study authors conclude. Sharing the financial burden of AIDS more equitably may be one strategy for eradicating the disease faster.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: December 5

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Peak gas: According to some forecasts, the fracking boom could be a bust.

By Mason Inman in Nature

2. To end the conflict with Boko Haram, Nigeria needs to address the alienation of its Muslims.

By John Campbell at the Council on Foreign Relations

3. “Protecting our coal workers is critical to successfully solving the climate problem.”

By Jeremy Richardson in the Union of Concerned Scientists

4. Tanzania can fight child marriage and protect the next generation of women by keeping girls in schools.

By Agnes Odhiambo in Human Rights Watch

5. When the last baby boomers move into retirement around 2030, today’s youth will carry the weight of our economy. They need support now.

By Melody Barnes in the World Economic Forum Blog

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Nov. 4, 2014

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Marcus Bleasdale’s work on child marriage in Tanzania, East Africa, where four out of 10 girls marry before their 18th birthday. The photographs, made on assignment for Human Rights Watch, draw attention to young girls and women who have been pressured or forced to marry as adolescents and undergo female genital mutilation. It’s a blunt, compelling look at the hardships these girls face.


Marcus Bleasdale: Child Marriage in Tanzania (Human Right Watch)

Lynsey Addario: Amid Record Waves of Refugees, Italy Finding Limits to Its Compassion (National Geographic News) These photographs from Sicily show how the island has become the entry point for migrants trying to reach Europe by sea.

Tanya Habjouqa: Widows of Syrian ‘Freedom Fighters’ (The New York Times Lens) These pictures document the poverty and uncertainty faced by Syrian widows and their families in Jordan.

Luca Locatelli: Where Ferraris Are Born (Wired Raw File) Inside the famed car factory in Maranello, Italy.

Twelve Views on Israel (Le Monde) Pictures from a project, This Place, for which 12 international photographers were invited to document Israel. NB The post is in French. Also published on TIME LightBox in April 2014.


Photojournalism Links is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen, Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.


TIME tanzania

Rats Sniff Out Danger: 15 Years of Land Mine Progress

In Tanzania Giant African Pouched Rat rats are being used to identify and sniff out land mines.

Correction appended, June 23

Fifteen years after the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention gathered for the first time with a signed treaty in Mozambique, its leaders met again Monday to asses the progress that has been made. In the past 15 years, 161 countries have signed on. The meeting, which will last through Friday, will evaluate the advancements that have been made banning the use of land mine weapons, helping land mine victims, and clearing minefields.

In the bordering country of Tanzania, Giant African Pouched Rat rats are being used to identify and sniff out land mines. These enormous rodents are bred and trained by a Belgian NGO called APOPO, which has it’s headquarters based in Tanzania. Once the rats have undergone the six-step training process to become experts at sniffing out TNT and detecting mines they are known as HeroRATs. These photo show what the training process is like for these life-saving rodents.

Correction: The original version of this story misstated when the meeting of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention will end and when members first met as signatories to the treaty.

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