TIME Food & Drink

You Won’t Believe Where the World’s Best Whiskey Comes From

Taiwan Whisky Winner
Wally Santana—AP A visitor walks past casks at the Kavalan whiskey distillery in Yilan County, Taiwan

Sorry, Scotland. Nice try, Japan

Taiwan’s Kavalan Solist Vinho Barrique is now officially the best single malt whiskey on earth, according to the World Whiskies Awards.

The contest’s judges described the malt as “surprisingly smooth on the palate” and added: “it’s like Bourbon infused milk chocolate.”

The spirit is produced at the King Car distillery in northeastern Taiwan’s Yilan County, where the whiskey is aged in American oak barrels that once stored white and red wines.

The distillery, which went operational just a decade ago, has been racking up a plethora of awards in recent years and getting nods from some of the world’s top single-malt connoisseurs. In 2012, the acclaimed guide Jim Murray’s Whisky Bible named Kavalan’s Solist Fino Sherry Cask malt the “new whisky of the year.”

Read next: Calorie Count Coming Soon to a Can of Guinness Near You

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TIME Internet

New Google Doodle Honors Instant-Noodle Inventor Momofuku Ando

Google

Peel off lid. Pour boiling water. Steep for three minutes. Stir well and serve.

Thursday marks the 105th birthday of Taiwanese-Japanese inventor Momofuku Ando, whose instant noodles revolutionized the food world, and Google is honoring this king of quick cuisine with a new Google Doodle.

As TIME wrote back in 2006, “In 1958, Momofuku Ando, an unassuming entrepreneur living in Osaka, created the instant noodle — and a continent has been feasting on his invention ever since.”

However, the road was not easy for the founder of Nissin Food Products. Ando struggled to find the right balance and create noodles that were tasty but did not become mush when boiled. The secret, learned from his wife, was to spray the noodles with chicken soup and then fry them in tempura oil.

The instant noodle, a dietary staple for every college student from Asia to America, had come to fruition.

Ando was born during the Japanese occupation of Taiwan in 1910, moved to Japan at the age of 23 became a Japanese citizen following World War II. He died in Osaka on Jan. 5, 2007, at the age of 96.

Read next: New Google Doodle Honors Inventor of Flat Map Gerardus Mercator

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TIME portfolio

The Best Pictures of the Week: Jan. 30 – Feb. 6

From New York’s deadly train crash and night surfing in the Mediterranean sea to China’s traditional eagle hunters and a Fifty Shades of Grey inspired “Fifty Shades of Cake” exhibition in England, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

TIME Taiwan

TransAsia Death Toll Hits 35 as Officials Point to Engine Failure

At least one of the engines failed just seconds into the flight

TransAsia Airways Flight 235 experienced engine failure shortly before it crashed in the Taiwanese capital, Taipei, on Wednesday, says Thomas Wang, executive director of Taiwan’s Aviation Safety Council.

According to the Associated Press, Wang said that one of the engines failed 37 seconds after the flight became airborne. The other engine, based on a preliminary review of the flight-data recorder, may have been shut down by the pilots in a bid to restart them both. But it is still too early to draw firm conclusions.

In a distress call made by the pilot before the plane went down, he can be heard saying, “Mayday mayday, engine flameout.”

The news comes as TransAsia announced that the death toll had risen to 35, after search teams recovered more bodies from Taipei’s Keelung River.

Officials said 15 people were injured and eight, all Chinese nationals, were still missing, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Flight 235 clipped a bridge and crashed into the river shortly after takeoff from Songshan Airport on Wednesday. The plane lost communication with air-traffic control four minutes after takeoff. It was heading to the Kinmen islands and most of those on board were Chinese tourists.

[WSJ]

TIME Taiwan

TransAsia Crash Death Toll Reaches 32 With 11 Passengers Still Missing

TransAsia Airways Plane Crashes In Taipei
Ashley Pon—Getty Images Rescuers check the wreckage of the TransAsia ATR 72-600 on the Keelung river at New Taipei City on Feb. 4, 2015

Experts suspect a "flameout" in one of the engines may have been to blame

Taiwanese search-and-rescue teams continued to search for 11 missing passengers from a TransAsia flight that crashed in Taipei on Wednesday morning, as the confirmed death toll from the disaster reached 32.

Flight 235 went down soon after takeoff after banking hard to the left, clipping a taxi driving on an overpass and slamming into Taipei’s Keelung River. Local broadcasters have released a recording of an unidentified crew member uttering “Mayday” three times before losing contact with the control tower.

Speculation as to why the plane ditched has revolved around the possible failure of the aircraft’s left engine that appeared to be malfunctioning in footage posted online.

“Before it hit the taxi, it made a hard left bank that’s indicative usually of the pilot trying to either avoid something or an uncontrolled event,” Mike Daniel, an international aviation-safety consultant based in Singapore, tells TIME.

However, authorities have refrained from commenting on possible causes until the official investigation concludes. On Wednesday, rescue teams successfully recovered the plane’s flight recorders and pulled its fuselage from the Keelung River after nightfall.

At least 32 people were killed during the crash. Fifteen passengers survived with injuries.

“I’m simply amazed that there were survivors,” says Daniel. “It actually speaks well to the construction of the aircraft to have survivors after that type of impact — not only after hitting the bridge but also cartwheeling into the water.”

TransAsia representatives said the ATR-72 turboprop had been in service for less than a year; however, after being delivered, one of the engines was immediately replaced after functioning improperly, reports the Wall Street Journal.

“Actually, this aircraft in the accident was the newest model. It hadn’t been used for even a year,” Peter Chen, TransAsia’s director, told reporters at a press conference, according to the Associated Press.

Wednesday’s accident marks the airline’s second deadly crash in less than 10 months. In July a TransAsia flight went down near the airport at Magong on Taiwan’s Penghu Island during a rainstorm, killing 48 people and injuring 10.

TIME Taiwan

Witness the TransAsia Plane Crash in Taiwan

At least 23 people were killed in Taiwan on Wednesday after a TransAsia plane crashed into a bridge shortly after take-off

TIME Aviation

At Least 26 Dead as Taiwanese TransAsia Plane Crashes in Taipei

Officials say at least 26 people killed during crash

A TransAsia Airways flight departing the Taiwanese capital Taipei on Wednesday morning crashed into a river nearby the terminal after coming into contact with an elevated roadway soon after takeoff.

The ATR-72 turboprop aircraft was bound for the offshore island of Kinmen with 58 people onboard, according to Taiwan’s Central News Agency. At least 26 people were killed during the crash, the Associated Press reports.

Rescue operations were ongoing and first responders in rubber boats were at the scene trying to enter the aircraft. Rescuers later used a crane to hoist wreckage out of the water.

Wednesday marks the second deadly incident for TransAsia in the past year after a plane crashed July 23 near the airport at Magong on Taiwan’s Penghu island during a thunderstorm, resulting in 48 deaths and 10 injuries.

TIME

Morning Must Reads: January 27

Capitol
Mark Wilson—Getty Images The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC.

Blizzard Skirts New York City

Up to four inches of snow an hour fell in parts of the Northeast early Tuesday as tens of millions of people hunkered down for a historic blizzard that shut down travel – but New York City and Philadelphia escaped the worst of the weather

Taiwan Targets Kids’ Screen Time

Taiwanese parents are now legally obligated to monitor their children’s screen time, in light of a new law allowing the government to impose fines

FBI Nabs Alleged Russian Spy

The FBI on Monday arrested an alleged Russian spy in NYC accused of conducting economic espionage — and his ‘spymasters’ may be to blame

Benedict Cumberbatch Apologizes After Race Row

Benedict Cumberbatch apologized Monday after talking about ‘colored actors’ on a U.S. talk show, ironically during a discussion on the lack of diversity in British acting. The Sherlock star said he’s “devastated to have caused offense”

Obama Pledges $4 Billion of Investment in India

U.S. President Barack Obama pledged $4 billion in investment and loans to India on Monday, soon after attending the South Asian nation’s 66th annual Republic Day celebrations as the guest of honor earlier in the afternoon

‘I’d Probably Do It Again,’ Says Lance Armstrong of Doping

Lance Armstrong claims he would never dope today. But if he had to go back in time, the 43-year-old cyclist who was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles would probably do it all over again. “People don’t like to hear that. That’s the honest answer,” he said

The U.S. Is Exonerating More People Than Ever

The U.S. exonerated a record number of people in 2014, according to a new report, continuing a steady increase over the last decade as cultural shifts have made some law enforcement agencies more willing to re-examine long-closed criminal cases

Emma Watson to Play Belle in Beauty and the Beast

The Harry Potter actress’ latest role will be another bookish heroine — Belle in Disney’s new live-action adaptation of the classic fairy tale. “Time to start some singing lessons,” the actress posted on her Facebook page

2 Officers Injured in Minnesota Shooting

A man opened fire on two police officers after a swearing-in ceremony at New Hope city hall in Minnesota on Monday. The shooter, who has not yet been named, was fatally shot after exchanging fire with other officers at the scene

Tomas Berdych Stuns Rafael Nadal in Australian Open

Tomas Berdych ended his 17-match losing streak to Rafael Nadal, stunning the Spaniard to advance to the Australian Open semifinals. Berdych played an impossibly clean match to upend Nadal, who was seeking to advance to his fifth tournament semifinal

Fighting Intensifies in Ukraine

Clashes continued to escalate in Ukraine on Monday after a weekend of fierce fighting and shelling in the country’s southeast rendered a five-month-old peace accord all but dead. Russian President Vladimir Putin blames a “NATO foreign legion” for the war

Former Hollywood Exec Accuses Bill Cosby of Sexual Assault

Cindra Ladd, a former entertainment executive, is the latest woman to publicly accuse the 77-year-old comedian of sexual assault. Ladd kept silent about the incident for 36 years, and says she has no plans to sue or discuss the matter any further

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TIME Parenting

This Place Just Made it Illegal to Give Kids Too Much Screen Time

Excess screen time is now considered to be the equivalent of smoking, drinking and using drugs.

Taiwanese parents are now legally obligated to monitor their children’s screen time.

Taiwanese lawmakers approved the “Child and Youth Welfare and Protection Act,” which expanded existing legislation to allow the government to fine parents of children under the age of 18 who are using electronic devices for extended periods of times. The law follows similar measures in China and South Korea that aims to limit screen time to a healthy level.

Citing health concerns, the Taiwanese government can fine parents up to $1595 ($50,000 Taiwanese Dollars) if their child’s use of electronic devices “exceeds a reasonable time,” according to Taiwan’s ETTV (and Google Translate). Under the new law, excess screen time is now considered to be the equivalent of vices like smoking, drinking, using drugs, and chewing betel nuts.

The new amendment doesn’t spell out exactly what time limits should be set on electronic devices (which are called 3C products in Taiwan), but says parents can be held liable if their children stare at screens for so long that its causes them to become ill, either physically or mentally, as Kotaku reports. While that should be O.K. for children angling for 15 more minutes of Minecraft, it’s unclear what is considered “reasonable” under the law— or how the Taiwanese government plans to regulate or monitor screen time.

According to Kotaku, so far the response to the legislation has been negative—which it undoubtedly would be in the U.S. as well—with Taiwanese citizens citing privacy concerns.

There are some parents however, who might welcome a little help prying their children’s eyes off screens. Studies have shown that excessive media use can lead to attention issues, behavioral problems, learning difficulties, sleep disorders, and obesity. Too much time online may even inhibit a child’s ability to recognize emotions, according to a study by the University of California, Los Angeles. Despite these risks, as technology increasingly becomes a part of modern life, children are spending more and more time in front of screens. A recent study found that in the U.S. 8-year-olds spend an average of eight hours a day with some form of media, with teenagers often clocking in at 11 hour a day of media consumption. A 2013 study by Nickelodeon found that kids watch an average of 35 hours a week of television.

So how much is too much screen time? According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, children under the age of two should have no screen time at all. Entertainment screen time should be limited to two hours a day for children ages 3-18, and that should be “high-quality content.” Common Sense Media, a San Francisco-based non-profit, has suggestions for setting up a “media diet” that works for your family.

TIME family subscribers can read our in-depth report on Raising the Screen Generation here. And don’t forget to sign up for Time’s free parenting newsletter.

TIME Taiwan

Man Found Dead in Taiwan After Multi-Day Video Game Binge

Taiwan Video Game show
Pichi Chuang—Reuters People play computer games during the Taipei Game Show 2009 in Taipei, Taiwan.

The man was reportedly a regular customer who often played for days

A man was found dead in a Taiwanese Internet cafe after an apparent three-day video game binge.

The 32-year-old man with the surname Hsieh died from cardiac failure, and an employee found him motionless on the morning of Jan. 8, CNN reported Monday. Hsieh entered the cafe on Jan. 6, according to Jennifer Wu, a police spokesperson from Taiwan’s Hunei district.

Police said the man had likely been dead for hours before he was discovered. The Taipei Times reports that the man was a frequent customer who often played for days on end.

“He has been unemployed for a long time, and Internet cafes were the only place he could go to,” Wu said.

[CNN]

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