TIME Google Doodle

New Google Doodle Honors Duke Kahanamoku, the Father of Surfing

The Hawaiian first built his reputation as a swimming champion

Monday’s Google Doodle wants to wish a big happy birthday to Duke Kahanamoku, the father of surfing.

Known as the Ambassador of Aloha, Kahanamoku traveled the world, bringing surfing to the likes of California, Australia and New Zealand over his lifetime. Aug. 24 marks what would’ve been Kahanamoku’s 125th birthday — he passed away in 1968.

On his native Hawaii, Kahanamoku was known for much more than just riding waves. He first built his reputation as a swimming champion, winning five Olympic medals over the course of his career. His success also enabled him to raise the profile of Hawaii’s true passion of surfing.

Kahanamoku was also elected the sheriff of his home county 13 times and starred in over a dozen movies. Most importantly, he is credited with helping the Hawaiian islands achieve statehood in 1959.

For Monday’s Google Doodle, illustrator Matt Cruickshank decided to honor Kahanamoku’s birthday by sketching his 16-ft. wooden surfboard along with a friendly likeness of the icon’s face.

Read next: How Duke Kahanamoku Saved Lives With His Surfboard

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TIME World

Teen Finds Gold Bar While Swimming in a Lake in Germany

The photo released on Aug. 12, 2015 shows a gold bar that was found by a teenager when swimming in a lake near Berchtesgaden, Germany.
Polizeipraesidium Oberbayern Sued/AP A gold bar tha found by a teenager when swimming in a lake near Berchtesgaden, Germany.

No one has any idea where the bar came from

(BERLIN) — A teenager has made an unexpected find while swimming in a lake in the German Alps: a 500-gram (17.6-ounce) bar of gold.

Police said Wednesday that they are still trying to figure out where the bar comes from and how it got into the Koenigssee lake, a popular tourist destination near Berchtesgaden on the border with Austria.

The 16-year-old girl, who was on vacation, found it around 2 meters (6 ½ feet) under the surface on Friday and handed it in to police.

Divers on Tuesday carried out a thorough search of the area around where the bar was found, but didn’t find any more gold or other valuables.

TIME swimming

American Teen Katie Ledecky Breaks World Swimming Record

Russia Swimming Worlds Katie Ledecky
Michael Sohn—AP United States' Katie Ledecky celebrates after winning the women's 800m freestyle final at the Swimming World Championships in Kazan, Russia on Aug. 8, 2015.

"I'm just proud of how I handled my races and how all this week has gone"

Correction appended: August 10, 2015.

(KAZAN, Russia)—There’s no stopping Katie Ledecky. The speedy teenager virtually raced herself at the world swimming championships, and she was unbeatable.

The 18-year-old American ended her meet in spectacular style Saturday night, lowering her own world record by 3.61 seconds in the 800-meter freestyle for her fifth gold medal.

She swam the 16-lap race in 8 minutes, 7.39 seconds, bettering her time of 8:11.00 set last year on home soil.

“I knew that I was capable of going sub-8:10,” she said, “so to go 8:07 means a lot.”

Ledecky completed a sweep of the 200, 400, 800 and 1,500 freestyles in Kazan. She swam the anchor leg on the victorious 4×200 free relay, too.

“It’s really neat to say that you’ve done something nobody has done before,” Ledecky said. “I’ll enjoy this for a few days and then I’ll get back to work and hopefully there’s more to come.”

She improved her results from two years ago in Barcelona, where she won four golds and set two world records. In Kazan, she won the 400 by 3.89 seconds, the 800 by 10.26 seconds and the 1,500 by 14.66 seconds, taking down her old world record in the preliminaries and the final.

Her closest race was the 200 free, when she rallied from fourth to win by 0.16 seconds.

“It could have been really tiring and it was,” Ledecky said. “But I recovered very well. I did what I needed to do to set myself up well each time that I got up on the blocks. I’m just proud of how I handled my races and how all this week has gone.”

On the men’s side, Sun Yang of China is poised for a nearly similar feat. He won the 400 and 800 freestyles and is favored to add the 1,500 on the last day Sunday. Sun finished second in the 200 free by 0.06 seconds.

Ledecky was under world-record pace throughout the 800, leaving the other swimmers trailing well behind her wake. She tore off one of her two swim caps and smashed the water with her hand in celebration of her third world record in Russia.

“I really love to see what she can do,” said Lauren Boyle, the silver medalist from New Zealand. “It shows what is possible for the human body. It’s very inspiring for me.”

Chad le Clos defended his title in the 100 butterfly, rallying late to edge Laszlo Cseh of Hungary in the absence of Olympic champion Michael Phelps, who beat Le Clos in London three years ago.

The South African was second at the turn and then poured it on down the stretch, touching in 50.56 seconds. Cseh was second in 50.87.

Joseph Schooling of Singapore, who led at the turn, finished third in 50.96.

Le Clos slapped the water with his right hand, then pounded his chest and nodded his head as if to say yes. His father frantically urged him on from the stands, bellowing when his son got to the wall first.

Phelps has missed the last two worlds, and Le Clos has emerged as the fly king in his absence. The American qualified for the meet in Kazan, but was forced to sit out as a result of his suspension by USA Swimming for a second drunken driving arrest.

Half a world away in Texas, Phelps swam the 100 fly preliminaries at U.S. nationals in 52.12 on Saturday, hours after winning the 200 fly with his best time since setting the world record in 2009.

“I’m just very happy that he’s back to his good form, so he can’t come out and say, ‘Oh, I haven’t been training’ or all that rubbish that he’s been talking,” Le Clos said. “I’ll relish the opportunity to race him again.”

Le Clos was coming off a disappointing second-place finish in the 200 fly behind Cseh, who has emerged as a medal threat for next year’s Olympics with a resurgence in Kazan.

“I was going to bounce back strong,” Le Clos said. “The last three days that’s all I thought about really was Laszlo and the silver medal.”

Florent Manaudou of France won the 50 free to go with his Olympic title. His time of 21.19 is fastest in the world this year.

Nathan Adrian of the United States finished second in 21.52. Bruno Fratus of Brazil took third.

Three-time defending champion Cesar Cielo of Brazil left Kazan earlier in the week because of a nagging shoulder injury.

Defending champion Missy Franklin faltered in the 200 backstroke, getting overtaken down the stretch by Emily Seebohm of Australia, who touched in 2:05.81 to complete a sweep of the backstroke events.

The men’s 100 and 200 back titles went Down Under too, with Seebohm’s teammate, Mitchell Larkin, claiming both in a double that inspired Seebohm.

Franklin, the Olympic champion, settled for silver in 2:06.34. In seven events so far, Franklin has five medals, but no individual gold two years after she won a record six golds in Barcelona.

“This is probably one of the hardest races to get second, just because I love it so much,” Franklin said. “But I’m honestly really happy with that. I fought my heart out. I went out after it and I swam it like Missy Franklin swims a two backstroke. I’m just not there at the end yet, and that’s all right.”

Katinka Hosszu of Hungary finished third.

Franklin returned later to anchor the U.S. team to victory in the mixed 4×100 free relay. Ryan Lochte, Adrian, Simone Manuel and Franklin won in 3:23.05, a world record. The Netherlands was second and Canada third.

Sarah Sjostrom of Sweden won the 50 butterfly, a non-Olympic event, in 24.96.

Correction: The original version of this story misstated the nationality of Joseph Schooling. He is from Singapore.

TIME swimming

After Two DUIs, Michael Phelps Says He Won’t Drink Again Until After the Rio Olympics

Michael Phelps won the Men's 200IM championship in a time of 1:59.39 during the Championship Finals of at the George F. Haines International Swim Center, on Jun 21, 2015.
Bob Stanton—USA Today Sports/Reuters Michael Phelps won the Men's 200IM championship in a time of 1:59.39 during the Championship Finals of at the George F. Haines International Swim Center, on Jun 21, 2015.

"If I'm going to come back, I need to do this the right way"

There was a time when Michael Phelps’ coach worried about what state he’d find the swimming champ in when he turned up for training in the morning.

But after two DUI arrests, a stint in treatment and a six-month suspension from competing, the Olympian with the most gold medals in history is trying to put those days behind him once and for all.

The 30-year-old, who has his sights set on competing at the Olympics in Brazil next year, is determined to stay sober.

“Before I even went to court, I said to myself that I’m not going to drink until after Rio – if I ever drink again,” he said in an interview with the Associated Press on Wednesday. “That was a decision I made for myself. I’m being honest with myself. Going into 2008 and 2012, I didn’t do that. I didn’t say I was going to take a year off from drinking and not have a drink.”

Phelps, who is not competing in the world championships in Kazan, Russia, because of his suspension, will be taking to the pool this week at the U.S. championships in San Antonio and is training hard.

“If I’m going to come back, I need to do this the right way,” he said. “I’ve got to put my body in the best physical shape I can possibly get it in. Is it a challenge? No. I go to bed earlier. I sleep more. I wake up every day and have a completely clear head. I don’t feel like my head went through a brick wall. There are so many positives to it.”

He admits there are days when he’d like to have a beer, but he’s resisting the temptation.

“I have a year left in my career,” he said. “If I really want it bad enough, I will make that sacrifice.”

The 18-time gold medalist, who announced his engagement to Nicole Johnson in February, said that therapy has helped him deal with his demons.

“I feel like I am okay and I am happy with who I am,” he said. “I feel like I’ve learned so much about myself, who I truly am. I can honestly say there aren’t many people who have seen who I really am.”

This article originally appeared on People.com.

TIME free diving

The World’s Greatest Free Diver Is Missing and Presumed Dead in Spanish Waters

She set 41 world records and won 23 world championships in the sport

Natalia Molchanova, regarded by many as the greatest free diver in the history of the sport, is missing and presumed dead after she disappeared during a dive off the Spanish island of Formentera on Aug. 2.

Molchanova, who set 41 world records and won 23 world championships in the sport, was diving for fun with friends close to the village of La Savina in an area where currents can fluctuate powerfully, the New York Times reports. Because she was diving for leisure and not to set a record, she was not attached to the line that divers often use to mark depth and guard against emergencies.

Her personal records in competition include a dive of 233 feet without the use of fins and almost 300 feet with a monofin. She also held the world record for “static apnea,” in which a diver floats face-down in a pool, managing to stay 9 minutes 2 seconds without taking a breath.

Search efforts begun after her disappearance continued for two days, but her son, Alexey Molchanov, who is also a respected free diver, told the Times on August 4 that she is now not expected to be found alive.

“Free diving is not only sport, it’s a way to understand who we are,” Molchanova said in an interview with the Times last year. “When we go down, if we don’t think, we understand we are whole. We are one with world.”

[NYT]

TIME swimming

U.S. Swimming Prodigy Katie Ledecky Beats Her Own World Record

Russia Swimming Worlds
Sergei Grits—AP Katie Ledecky smiles after setting a new record in a women's 1500-m freestyle heat at the Swimming World Championships in Kazan, Russia, on Aug. 3, 2015

It's the fourth time Ledecky has broken the record

(KAZAN, Russia) — American teenager Katie Ledecky has improved her own world record in the 1,500-meter freestyle at the swimming world championships.

The 18-year-old Ledecky completed the marathon-like race in 15 minutes, 27.71 seconds — shaving 0.65 seconds off the mark she set at last year’s Pan Pacific championships in Australia.

The swim came during morning heats Monday. She’ll have a chance to improve it again in Tuesday’s final.

It’s the fourth time Ledecky has broken the record in the 1,500. She also holds world marks in the 400 and 800 free.

TIME tennis

Australian Sporting Icon Tells the Country’s Top Two Tennis Players to ‘Go Back to Where Their Parents Came From’

Former Australian swimmer Dawn Fraser smiles during a Reuters interview in Sydney
© Daniel Munoz / Reuters—REUTERS Former Australian swimmer Dawn Fraser smiles during a Reuters interview in Sydney April 7, 2011.

"We don't need them here in this country to act like that," says veteran Olympian Dawn Fraser

Legendary Australian swimmer Dawn Fraser has apologized for the inflammatory remarks she made about Nick Kyrgios, the Australian tennis player who is being accused of throwing his fourth-round match at Wimbledon against Richard Gasquet.

On Tuesday, the morning after Kyrgios’ controversial defeat, Fraser appeared on Australia’s Today Show to decry his behavior on the court as “absolutely disgusting,” and to advise him and fellow Australian tennis player Bernard Tomic to “go back to where their parents came from.”

“We don’t need them here in this country to act like that,” she said.

Kyrgios was born in Canberra but is of Malaysian and Greek heritage; Tomic was born in Germany but moved to Australia in 1996, when he was 3 years old.

After Fraser’s remarks, Kyrgios posted a message to Facebook calling her a bigot and denouncing what he saw as a double standard.

“Throwing a racket, brat. Debating the rules, disrespectful. Frustrated when competing, spoilt. Showing emotion, arrogant. Blatant racist, Australian legend,” he wrote.

Fraser apologized shortly thereafter in a public statement, though she did not redact her chief complaint — that Kyrgios, who currently faces a possible $20,000 in fines for his behavior at Wimbledon, acted unbecomingly.

“Australians have a rich sporting heritage made up of individuals from a variety of different countries of origin,” she said. “Nick’s representing Australia, and I want to see him representing Australian tennis in the best possible light … Not only do you represent yourself, your team, your fans and your family but you are representing the heritage of the competition and acting as a role model for young Australians.”

Fraser, who is 77, earned eight Olympic swimming medals for Australia between 1956 and 1964. She attracted some national controversy at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, when authorities accused her of swimming across the moat surrounding Emperor Hirohito’s palace to steal an Olympic flag.

TIME public health

3 Things You Can Catch from a Pool

tube-rings-swimming-pool
Getty Images

Outbreaks of illnesses from hot tubs and pools have been increasing in recent years

Think a chlorinated pool is a safe, sterile place? Think again. There are a few dangers lurking in a shared pool, whether at a gym, a community center or even a fancy resort. In fact, outbreaks of illnesses from hot tubs and pools have been increasing in recent years, with 90 outbreaks causing 1,788 illnesses and one death between 2011-2012, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Learn what icky things you can pick up, plus how to ward them off.

Diarrhea

One of the top causes of post-swim illness is a parasite called cryptosporidium (crypto for short), which leads to diarrhea, stomach pain and nausea. According to the new CDC report, of the 69 outbreaks associated with treated water, more than half were caused by crypto. Symptoms can last for up to two weeks. The parasite ends up in the water if feces (even trace amounts from someone who didn’t shower first) of an infected person gets in the pool. The bug is resistant to chlorine and survives outside the body for long periods.

Protect yourself: Crypto spreads when you accidentally swallow contaminated pool water or you touch your mouth before washing your hands. Don’t touch your face until you’ve had your post-swim shower, with soap and hot water.

Pinkeye

Burning eyes, excessive tearing and redness can occur because of an allergic reaction to chlorine, or an infection if the pool isn’t chlorinated enough. It can also happen if people aren’t showering before swimming or are (ugh!) peeing in the pool. Urine, as well as cosmetics and other chemicals that can wash off people’s skin, can irritate your eyes.

Protect yourself: You can shield your eyes from all of this by wearing a pair of well-fitting goggles every time you go for a dip.

Hot Tub Rash

This is an itchy skin infection that can lead to a bumpy, red rash, often worse in the areas covered by your bathing suit. Chlorine can easily kill the germ that causes it, but the warm water in a hot tub makes chlorine break down faster, so it’s more likely you’d pick it up there.

Protect Yourself: The risk of hot tub rash goes up the longer the contaminated water touches your skin, which is why it seems to show up in areas your wet bathing suit clings to. Save your dip in the hot tub for the end of your pool day, shower and change shortly after your soak and wash your swimsuit before wearing it again.

Contributed reporting by Amelia Harnish.

This article originally appeared on Health.com

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TIME Parenting

What to Tell Your Kids about Water Safety

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Jordan Siemens—Getty Images

Drowning is leading cause of accidental death for children

Summer means a lot of us will head for the water.

But when we do, says Tom Griffiths, founder of the Aquatic Safety Research Group, and former Director of Aquatics and Safety Officer for Athletics at Penn State University, we need to be alert. Because, depending on their age group, drowning is consistently the first or second leading cause of accidental death for children.

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Most of the wisdom of the past, Griffiths says, focused on paying close attention while kids are in the water. But no parent can be alert enough to fully protect a child. In fact, some cognitive psychologists have come to the conclusion that “lifeguarding is really an impossible task,” he says. A busy waterside, filled with lots of kids, is just “too much stimulus for the human brain.”

His solution?

At all ages, he says, kids should be in Coast-Guard approved life jackets–ones that fit. “No one has ever drowned in a properly fitting life jacket,” Griffiths says. So until they can pass a standard swim test, Griffiths says, kids should be wearing one.

And while parents may worry that kids will resist, his research shows that when pools offer life jackets, attendance actually goes up–probably because both parents and kids feel safer with the extra protection. Even more important, the number of water rescues plummets, by as much as 90%.

In elementary school, Griffiths says, parents should begin by helping kids view life jackets as a standard safety measure, “like buckling up a seatbelt, or wearing a helmet on a bike.” Having to wear a life jacket can also give kids an incentive to learn how to swim, according to Griffiths: “now the prize is they get out of their jacket.”

Middle school kids should be encouraged to do whatever it takes to get comfortable in the water, whether that’s formal swimming lessons, or just spending time in water sports or activities. But Griffiths also encourages parents to help kids avoid risky behavior in the water. One that’s especially popular, and dangerous, is breath-holding contests. Instead, parents can encourage kids to concentrate on breath control and relaxation.

High school kids may get overconfident, Griffiths says. Many teenagers overestimate how good they are at swimming, even though studies show that almost half of Americans can hardly swim at all. That kind of bravado is especially common under peer pressure. So parents can talk with kids about being realistic about their abilities. Another warning Griffiths suggests parents give to older kids: never dive until they know how deep the water is, because “95% of injuries resulting in paralysis are in less than 5 feet of water.”

The good news, according to Griffiths, is that, with the right strategies, “drowning is so easily preventable.” And as more and more parents rely on a combination of life jackets and swim lessons, he believes the rate will decrease even further.

TIME Bizarre

Attention Hipster Swimmers, This Beard Cap Is the Answer to Your Prayers

Virgin Trains, official train partner to the Great North Swim, has launched an innovative swim cap for bearded men – the Beard Cap - which will be trialled with customers competing at the Great North Swim, Lake Windermere, June 12 – 14, 2015. Responding to debates on swimming forums about big beards causing drag, Virgin Trains commissioned its own research which revealed that over one in ten men (12 per cent) connected their beard to slower swim times, and nearly a quarter of men feel their beards hinder their sports performance. For swimmers, spectators and supporters planning a weekend away to the Lakes during the Great North Swim, there are exclusive discounts of up to 50%  across Virgin Trains First and Standard Advance Fares. To find out more information and buy tickets to travel to The Great North Swim visit http://www.virgintrains.co.uk/nova/
Mikael Buck—Virgin Trains Virgin Trains has launched an innovative swim cap for bearded men which will be trialled with customers competing at the Great North Swim, Lake Windermere, U.K., on June 12–14, 2015

Talk about shaving a few seconds off your swim time

Facial hair, especially the long unruly kind, can prove a severe impediment to a swimmer’s aquatic aerodynamic ability. A new invention from Virgin Trains called the Beard Cap, however, promises to change that forever.

The “innovative swim cap for bearded men,” as the rail company described the device in a press release, is just like a regular swimming cap, except it also extends to cover the wearer’s chin and press the beard closer to the face. The cap, which is “reusable, adjustable and perfect for keeping bushy beards under control,” will be launched at the Great North Swim in England’s Lake Windermere from June 12 to 14.

The invention is even backed by research commissioned by the company, which revealed that over 1 in 10 men attributed their beard to slower swim times, and nearly a quarter of men feel their beards negatively impact sports performance.

“At Virgin Trains we’re passionate about giving our customers the most awesome experience possible, and this extends to their sporting endeavors as they are traveling to the Great North Swim with us,” said Adrian Verma, the company’s senior partnerships and marketing manager. “In addition to the 50% discounted tickets to the event for spectators and competitors, we’re delighted to be offering customers this innovative cap to help them do their best.”

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