TIME Opinion

The Fanny Pack: Symbol of Male Liberation

In defense of the world's greatest supply bag

America’s national arbiter of Southern Cool, Matthew McConaughey, declared his love for the fanny pack to the world while at Fenway Park Sunday.

“I’m not afraid of the fanny pack,” said McConaughey, when confronted about his accessory. “You gotta kind of put it on the side to make it look a little not as nerdy, but still, practicality wins out. I got so much gear in here that I don’t want in my pockets.”

The Houston Astros Vs. The Boston Red Sox At Fenway Park
Actor Matthew McConaughey stands for the national anthem at the Red Sox game at Fenway Park on August 17, 2014. (Photo by Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images) Boston Globe—Boston Globe via Getty Images

For those not in the know, a fanny pack is a small pouch worn around the waist like a belt. Supposedly once the pouch was worn over the buttocks, hence the name, though no one wears them that way today. They peaked as a fashion item in the 1980s.

McConaughey’s love for the fanny pack is all good and well and I offer him my sincerest stamp of approval but his statement deserves a lingering glance. He speaks not only to today’s evolving fashion trends and the utility of the fanny pack but to the society’s sexist fashion standards and the plight of modern man, especially when it’s hot outside.

Consider the options available to a man wishing to carry a few supplies out into the world (excluding winter time, when the giant coat and the fact that going out is awful anyway renders the conundrum moot).

The briefcase—No one took you seriously when you carried one in high school and no one takes you seriously now, unless there are actual briefs (the legal kind) in that thing.

The backpack—We could rename it “The backsweat.” Also kind of juvenile, but it’ll do in a pinch.

The satchel—Known to everyone talking out of earshot as your “murse,” this bag is actually pretty handy but it can be a bulky when you’re trying to feel light and free and summery.

The hand—Real men carry things with their hands. But we are not real men and haven’t been since the end of the Stone Age so moving on.

The purse—Bless you bold purse carriers, but no. Getting an arm into the strap is impossible and there is just no way to hold these things other than with hand on strap arm extended at 90 degrees. Ergonomically out of the question. I am not alone.

The fanny pack— Small, light and comfy. The flip flop of supply bags. Liberator of male-kind. The fanny pack will get you where you need to go along with your carmex, knife, road beer, sunglasses, or whatever else. You will not be dependent (in the supply arena, anyway) on a purse-wielder, nor will you be weighed down by any aforementioned bulky or discomfiting bags.

Through the centuries man has known it to be true that the fanny pack is tops. Only recently, in this dark age of meggings and other fashion crimes, have we lost sight of our centuries old love for the fanny pack. See here, symbol of manly freedom and fanny pack pioneer, The King of the Wild Frontier himself, Davy Crockett.

Davy Crockett, King Of The Wild Frontier
Silver Screen Collection—Getty Images

Follow McConaughey, men. Follow Crockett. Embrace the fanny pack. You have nothing to lose but your chains. You have the world to win.

TIME Advertising

One Fashion Brand Takes the ‘No Photoshop Pledge,’ Who’s Next?

ModCloth is the first retailer to officially promise not to retouch its models, but its not the only company eschewing Photoshop

ModCloth has taken the pledge. The online fashion retailer became the first brand to officially pledge not to retouch its models by signing the Heroes Pledge for Advertisers agreement last week.

The pledge was created by group behind the bipartisan bill called The Truth in Advertising Act, which was introduced in March and asks the Federal Trade Commission to develop regulations regarding retouched advertisements.

By signing the pledge, which is self-regulated, ModCloth has effectively promised three things:

  • To do their best not to change the shape, size, proportion, color or remove or enhance the physical features, of the people in ads in post-production.
  • That if the company does make post-production changes to the people in their ads, they will add a “Truth In Advertising” label.
  • They will not run any ads that include retouched models in media where children under 13 might see them.

It’s not surprising that ModCloth chose to sign the pledge. The San Francisco-based company is known for its vintage-style clothing and accessories marketed to the younger set. “We’ve always believed in celebrating and showing real women in our marketing,” ModCloth chief marketing officer Nancy Ramamurthi told Today, noting that company hasn’t used professional models since its launch in 2002 and has never used Photoshop to retouch them. “It was a no-brainer to sign on and participate.”

Though ModCloth is the first retailer to sign the pledge, thankfully it isn’t alone when it comes to moving away from unrealistic perfection in their catalogues. Earlier this year Aerie, American Eagle’s lingerie brand, released ads that proclaimed, “No more retouching our girls and no more supermodels.” The words went with a series of ads featuring unretouched models complete with tattoos and normal, everyday folds and bulges. (Though they were all slim, young and beautiful…) The brand also redesigned its website to include a bra guide with each product modeled in every size to give the average customer an idea of how the garment would look on them — and not a size zero model.

“This is now our brand,” Aerie’s senior director of marketing Dana Seguin told Fast Company in January. “It’s not a seasonal campaign for us. It is now how we’re talking to our customers.”

And then there’s sportswear company Title Nine, which, unsurprisingly given its name, has a pro-woman outlook. The company uses athletes as their models and, according to the website’s model mission statement: “It’s our models that best represent who we are here at Title Nine. All are ordinary women capable of extraordinary things…. We hope as you look through our online store and our catalog, you’ll see a little bit of yourself in each picture.” Similarly, Betabrand used non-professional models in its spring campaign; instead, online retailer selected women who had PhDs or were doctorial candidates to model the clothes.

Considering that study after study has found that depictions of women in the media have an impact on the way women and girls feel about their own bodies, it’s heartening to know that some companies are taking care about their own portrayals of women’s bodies. But while it would be wonderful to see more companies sign the Heroes Pledge for Advertisers, it would be even more wonderful for such a campaign to be unnecessary.

TIME celebrities

Tavi Gevinson: A Power Teen’s New Direction

"This Is Our Youth" Cast Photo Call
Actress Tavi Gevinson attends the "This Is Our Youth" Cast Photo Call at Cort Theatre on August 14, 2014 in New York City. Cindy Ord—Getty Images

Tavi Gevinson became a hero to a generation of girls — then she graduated from high school

This article originally appeared on Rolling Stone.

Recently, Tavi Gevinson – editor-in-chief of Rookie magazine, budding Broadway star and possibly the most influential 18-year-old in America – went to her first and last high school rager. Earlier that day, she’d graduated from Oak Park and River Forest High in suburban Chicago, tromping around the football field in the blazing heat. In terms of doing the classic high school party thing, she thought, it was now or never. “It was at this guy’s house,” she says, “and I was like, ‘Oh, you know what makes social anxiety better is if you just keep drinking.'” Which she did until things got messy (“There was vomit”), though not too messy (“I didn’t try to seduce anyone”), after which Gevinson made her way home, where her mom helped her into bed: “In the morning she gave me a flower and explained why drinking is extremely dangerous and why not to mix stuff and to eat first and to not do it until I’m 21. Then my dad came in, and they both laughed at me.”

If Gevinson has failed to indulge in such iconic teenage pastimes to date, that’s thanks to her many pressing duties as our culture’s Teenager Par Excellence. Gevinson’s role as universal expert on all things teenage has, somewhat ironically, left her little time for iconic teenage experiences like this one. At 11, she started Style Rookie, a blog that garnered the attention of fashionistas the world over with its pictures of a tiny, unsmiling Gevinson, standing in a suburban backyard and wearing the most fantastical of garments. Soon she was flying to Paris for Fashion Week, meeting Karl Lagerfeld and Anna Wintour. Sporting a dyed silver-blue bob, thick glasses and Iris Apfel-inspired outré-granny chic (“People talked about how when you’re a woman of a certain age you stop caring about certain things, and I was like, ‘If I can try that now I will be ahead of the curve'”), she became a sort of high-fashion mascot, half prodigy, half pet.

MORE: In Pics: 9 Shocking Teen Star Meltdowns

And then, just like that, Gevinson decided to leave these childish things behind. “I was like, ‘This is so goofy: We’re watching people wear clothes.'” Inspired by now-defunct alt-teen magazine Sassy, and with the guidance of Sassy‘s founding editor, Jane Pratt – who was listed on the masthead as “fairy godmother” – and This American Life‘s Ira Glass, Gevinson launched Rookie. It since has become the Web’s most famous one-stop compendium of what it is to be a teenage girl, ruminating on everything from Carl Sagan to how to wear a leotard “without giving a damn,” and casting all of its topics through a smart, feminist lens (instead of dating advice, it has a column called “Ask a Grown Man,” to which Jon Hamm and Thom Yorke have contributed).

Rookie‘s popularity is such that it has created a sort of clubhouse effect, spawning an annual yearbook and a nationwide tour – in which girls crammed into ice cream parlors and record stores from Brooklyn to L.A. in the hopes of meeting Gevinson – and turning its petite founder into both a media juggernaut and a generational spokeswoman with friends like Lena Dunham (who once stopped by for takeout when Gevinson was grounded) and Lorde, who tells me, “Had I not been fortunate enough to grow up with the never-ending wisdom and confusion of Tavi, I wouldn’t be the same. She is fearsome. Her writing, her aesthetic leanings, her need to have more, to know more, sparked that in me and infected everyone young today. I’m lucky to have her as my friend.”

MORE: 50 Things Millennials Know That Gen-Xers Don’t

Gevinson, the daughter of a Jewish high school English teacher and a Norwegian weaver, grew up the youngest of three sisters, watching Friends and That ’70s Show, hiding out in the bathroom at school when she felt overwhelmed (“A girl would come and be like, ‘Mrs. Carter sent me to see if you’re OK,’ and I’d be like, ‘I’m pooping'”) and, until recently, getting an allowance of $8 a week. Then there was the toggling between her middle-class Midwestern upbringing and her international fame; the endless recording of her youth for the masses, which, she says, “made it hard for me to live in a moment because I was always narrating it,” and the juxtaposition of standard adolescent milestones with very nonstandard ones. “I went on The Colbert Report. I came home. The next day I went to school, then I lost my virginity,” she declares matter-of-factly before cracking a wry smile. “Now someone’s going to be like, ‘Oh, I’m gonna go watch that video and see if I can sense that she’s about to be deflowered.'”

As Gevinson is saying all this, she’s sitting cross-legged on the sofa of a high-rise Chicago apartment that represents a decidedly more adult moment for her. After a memorable turn in the 2013 movie Enough Said, she’s starring opposite Michael Cera and Kieran Culkin in a Steppenwolf Theatre remounting of Kenneth Lonergan’s This Is Our Youth, which moves to Broadway in September. The play skewers the rudderless angst of suspended adolescence. Gevinson’s performance has drawn raves. Last night, the cast had gathered in Culkin’s apartment to play Mario Kart and guitar until 4:30 a.m., at which point Gevinson retired to her place to take a bubble bath and eat chocolate before falling asleep to The Last Days of Disco. When she’d answered the door just past noon, her hair was still wet from the shower, and she was cheerfully dunking a bag of green tea into a cup of hot water. “This morning,” she’d said, “I was really pleased at my desire to meet the day.”

MORE: In Pics: Millennials’ Most Earth-Shaking Sexual Moments

The apartment is the only place she’s lived besides her childhood home, where her room was “the size of a van” and the hundreds of items sent to her over the years by Rookie readers are packed in the basement – an anthropological trove that she “prays doesn’t just deteriorate.” Only the most meaningful artifacts of her girlhood have accompanied her, among them a box made for her by a Rookie reader labeled FOR WHEN YOU FEEL LIKE SHIT and a book of haunting illustrations by German artist Sulamith Wülfing given to her by Stevie Nicks. “Tavi, study this,” reads the inscription. “It will change your life. She is one of us. The eldest angel. I love you, Stevie.”

Living alone is still so novel that Gevinson is excited by the mundane chores of housekeeping. “I really like grocery shopping, probably because I’m not a real adult, so it’s like a novelty to me,” she says. “Kieran and Michael were teasing me yesterday because I was like, ‘I can’t wait to go home and eat my groceries.’ And they were like, ‘That’s not a type of food. No one’s like, “I’m really in the mood for groceries.”‘”

Though Gevinson grew up acting in school plays and community theater, it’s a pursuit she’s only recently decided to revisit. And yet, she says, it taps into something that’s been an impulse for her all along: a way to try on different identities. “When you’re onstage, you can’t think, like, ‘Oh, how is the audience responding to me as a person?’ I mean, it just helped to kind of feel like more of a clean slate.”

Which, preparing for her life ahead, is what she feels she needs. This Is Our Youth runs on Broadway through January 4th, and next fall she’ll be attending NYU. While her role as top editor and curator of Rookie will remain unchanged, the magazine will not age with her – it will maintain its focus on teen girls.

And, at least for the minute, Gevinson’s own focus has returned to fashion: She has begun creating a wardrobe for New York, costuming the version of herself she thinks she’ll be then (“I bought a lot of sequined tops”). In the meantime, she’s still feeling out what it means to be who she is now. “I know I’m not the person I was in high school,” she muses. “But I’m not a new person yet either. It’s just that kind of in between.”

MORE: 50 Things Millennials Have Never Heard Of

TIME Style

North West Makes Her Solo Modeling Debut Dripping With Chanel

Baby North West makes her modeling debut in he latest issue of CR Fashion Book.
Baby North West makes her modeling debut in he latest issue of CR Fashion Book. Michael Avedon—CR Fashion Book

Kimye's one-year-old daughter appears in the pages of "CR Fashion Book"

In the words of Karl Lagerfeld, “It is never too early to care about fashion.” The same seems to be true when it comes to modeling, as least in the case of little North West. The 13-month-old daughter of Kanye West and Kim Kardashian has made her modeling debut in this fall’s issue of CR Fashion Book.

The photo, taken by photographer Michael Avedon for an editorial spread called “Legends,” is captioned with Lagerfield’s words and dubs the littlest West the “Future” of fashion. Carine Roitfeld, the former French Vogue editor and the found of CR Fashion Book, styled little North for the shoot, pairing her with a Chanel brooch and bag, and some Lorraine Schwartz diamond earrings.

Did we mention that this is a baby we’re talking about here? But while it might all sound just a wee bit ridiculous, it’s important to remember that North isn’t just any baby: She’s already appeared in the pages of Vogue, along with her parents, and is due to appear in the upcoming wedding episodes of Keeping Up With The Kardashians. Then there’s the countless paparazzi photos she’s already appeared in throughout her young life, not to mention her mother’s Instagram feed. With that in mind, a black-and-white photo shoot wearing high-fashion labels doesn’t really seem all that out of line.

TIME Style

Kendall Jenner Appears On Not One, But Two Teen Vogue Covers

Emma Summerton for Teen Vogue

Move over Kim!

Kendall Jenner has taken her sibling Kim Kardashian’s lead and landed herself not one, but two major magazine covers. The teenager graces the cover of Teen Vogue‘s September issue and the magazine’s editors not only gave her two different shots, they also dubbed her “fashion’s new IT GIRL.”

Jenner, 18, who rose to international fame along with the rest of the Kardashian/Jenner clan on their reality show Keeping Up With The Kardashians, broke into high-fashion modeling earlier this year at New York Fashion Week, taking to the catwalk for Marc Jacobs’ fall show in February.

But according to Jenner, her pre-modeling fame didn’t exactly pave an easy route into high-fashion. “People didn’t want to take a chance on me, I think because I was sort of known,” she tells Teen Vogue. “They were a little bit on the fence about it. Some people might think that what I’ve done before made it easier for me to get jobs, but it was actually a disadvantage. I had to work even harder.”

Of course, despite any doubts fashion insiders had about Jenner’s credentials, the Teen Vogue September issue cover will likely lock her in as a rising star in the modeling world. And with that, the Kardashian/Jenner march toward total cultural domination marches on.

TIME Culture

The Unforgettable Fashion of Seinfeld‘s Elaine Benes

In honor of the 25th anniversary of the famous sitcom's premier, here's a gallery of some of our favorite Elaine looks. (If only we could order them directly from the J. Peterman catalog.)

Twenty-five years after the premiere of Seinfeld, there’s no question about the show’s outsize cultural influence. In its nine-season run, Seinfeld changed the way we talk, the way we joke and even influenced our spending habits. And, yes, the way we dress. You can see deep Seinfeld influences in what’s now called “Normcore,” a fashion trend New York Magazine identified with a photo essay in February 2014. It’s a look best described as the clothes your dad wears when goes to the mall. You know, ill-fitting jeans, fleece vests, flat sandals or white sneakers that are all about comfort.

But forget about Jerry and his famous Puffy Shirt for a second. We should be focusing on the show’s real fashion star: Elaine Benes, played by the incomparable Julia Louis-Dreyfus. We’re not the first publication to point out that many of her outfits look like something you’d find today on a hipster in Williamsburg or an American Apparel mannequin, but that doesn’t mean we can’t take a minute to appreciate her. Elaine’s real strength came from her ability to look modest but stylish: just check out the pattern mixing, the oh-so-90’s light-blue denim, the shoulder pads, floral dresses and more.

So give your BFF a shove, tell them to “Get Out!” and start doing the Little Kicks dance: It’s time to celebrate Elaine.

TIME Style

Graphic Designer Massimo Vignelli Dies at 83

Massimo Vignelli Dead
Massimo Vignelli poses on the Exhibition "Kkann: lacqua - il Flusso " of Artist Dario Milana, At Milan Stock Exchange Opening Days on Nov. 18, 2011 in Milan. Pier Marco Tacca—Getty Images

The renowned designer did work for Bloomingdale's, the National Park Service, Xerox, IBM and Ford and has been featured in many international exhibits

Acclaimed graphic designer Massimo Vignelli, whose most recognizable works include the original American Airlines logo and a 1972 New York City subway map, died Tuesday at age 83.

Yoshiki Waterhouse, who worked at the designer’s company, said Vignelli had been sick and died in his Manhattan home, the Associated Press reports.

Vignelli, who was born in Italy and immigrated to the United States in the 1960s, also created memorable work for Bloomingdale’s, the National Park Service, Xerox, IBM, Gillette and Ford, which has been exhibited in museums around the world, the New York Times reports.

But the most enduring, perhaps, is the subway map. His “contribution to improving the way New Yorkers find their way around the subway system is hard to overstate, and it will endure for a long time to come,” MTA spokesman Kevin Ortiz told the AP.

Vignelli is survived by his wife and business partner, Lella, as well as two children and three grandchildren.

On desktop, roll over this graphic to get a closer look; on mobile, click to zoom.

MTA

[AP]

TIME Style

Decoding Jackie O’s Signature Style

From oversize shades to all white everything, we break down the timeless look of an American icon

Twenty years ago today, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died of cancer at the age of 64. Today, she’s remembered as a wife, mother and graceful figure who championed the arts and literature. But Jackie is also a bonafide fashion icon who inspired millions with her chic wardrobe and effortless style. During her initial year as First Lady, she reportedly spent $45,446 more on her wardrobe than the $100,000 annual salary her husband earned as president (which he donated to charity). Below, a breakdown of the elements that defined Jackie’s signature style.

MORE: Jackie Kennedy in the Early Sixties: Making of an American Icon

  • Pillbox Hats

    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy on an official visit to Paris in 1961.
    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy on an official visit to Paris in 1961. RDA

    Jackie started more than a few trends during her first year in the White House, including popularizing the pillbox hat. Many of her stylish chapeaus, which she often wore in different colors, were designed for her by Halston. She famously wore a pink suit and matching pillbox hat on the day her husband was assassinated.

     

     

  • Oversize Sunglasses

    Jackie Onassis on the streets of New York City on Oct. 7, 1971.
    Jackie Onassis on the streets of New York City on Oct. 7, 1971. Ron Galella—WireImage/Getty Images

    Jackie’s signature shades were both stylish and functional. She has been quoted saying she liked the opportunity they gave her to watch people and that she kept multiple pairs of sunglasses in a basket by her front door.

  • Headscarves

    Jackie Onassis walks through a busy street in Capri, Italy, in the early 1970s.
    Jackie Onassis walks through a busy street in Capri, Italy, in the early 1970s. Hulton Archive—Getty Images

    Jackie had an ability to make even the most casual outfits look chic, and often paired headscarves with giant sunglasses when she was outdoors.

  • Perfectly Styled Hair

    Jackie Kennedy sits in the living room of her Washington, D.C., residence, March 27, 1960 during her husband's campaign.
    Jackie Kennedy sits in the living room of her Washington, D.C., residence, March 27, 1960 during her husband's campaign. AP

    Though her hairstyle evolved over the years, Jackie’s voluminous coif was an integral part of her signature lookl. Her iconic bouffant was created by Kenneth Battelle, the famed hairdresser to the stars who also styled Marilyn Monroe.

  • Elbow Length Gloves

    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy attends a luncheon with French President Charles DeGaulle (right) on June 2, 1961 in Washington, D.C.
    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy attends a luncheon with French President Charles DeGaulle (right) on June 2, 1961 in Washington, D.C. Paul Schutzer—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

    Gloves were another signature accessory for Jackie for both day and night. She favored white elbow length gloves at formal evening events, which were often commissioned by LaCrasia Gloves in New York City’s famed garment district.

  • Strapless Gowns

    U.S. President John Kennedy and First Lady Jackie receive French Minister of Culture Andre Malraux at the White House in Washington, D.C., on May 11, 1962.
    U.S. President John Kennedy and First Lady Jackie receive French Minister of Culture Andre Malraux at the White House in Washington, D.C., on May 11, 1962. Apic/Getty Images

    As First Lady, Jackie frequently wore shoulder-baring gowns to official events that showed off her slim physique — a daring move in the 1960’s.

  • Bows

    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy wears a fitted silk apricot dress and triple strand of pearls, walking through crowds at Udaipur during visit to India on March 1, 1962.
    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy wears a fitted silk apricot dress and triple strand of pearls, walking through crowds at Udaipur during visit to India on March 1, 1962. Art Rickerby—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

    Jackie often accented her famously tiny waist with strategically placed bows.

  • Capes

    U.S. President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jackie Kennedy at the Inaugural Ball on Jan. 20, 1961 in Washington, D.C.
    U.S. President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jackie Kennedy at the Inaugural Ball on Jan. 20, 1961 in Washington, D.C. Corbis

    Few people can carry off a cape, so it’s no surprise the dramatic accessory was a part of Jackie’s signature style as First Lady.

  • Amazing Coats

    Jackie Kennedy visits Paris c. the late-1960s.
    Jackie Kennedy visits Paris c. the late-1960s. Michael Ochs Archives—Getty Images

    Long before Olivia Pope rocked every conceivable style of cold-weather cover-up, Jackie dazzled with her seemingly endless array of fabulous, covetable coats.

  • Equestrian-Inspired Style

    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy at the Piedmont Foxhounds Races in Upperville, Virginia on March 26, 1961.
    U.S. First Lady Jackie Kennedy at the Piedmont Foxhounds Races in Upperville, Virginia on March 26, 1961. Bettmann/Corbis

    Having grown up riding horses, Jackie made equestrian garb look effortlessly chic.

  • Matching Offspring

    Jackie Kennedy with John F. Kennedy Jr. on Easter Sunday April 14, 1963, in Palm Beach, Fla.
    Jackie Kennedy with John F. Kennedy Jr. on Easter Sunday April 14, 1963, in Palm Beach, Fla. AP

    Jackie’s fashion sense extended to her children, which meant John and Caroline wore outfits that frequently complemented or matched their mother’s.

  • White on White on White

    From right: U.S. President John F. Kennedy First Lady Jackie Kennedy attend the first America's Cup race on Sept. 9, 1962 in Newport, R.I.
    From right: U.S. President John F. Kennedy First Lady Jackie Kennedy attend the first America's Cup race on Sept. 9, 1962 in Newport, R.I. Courtesy of Kennedy Library Archives/Newsmakers/Getty Images

    Jackie understood the power of the simple monochromatic look, and may have been the originator of the All White Everything look that’s back in fashion.

TIME royals

Kate Middleton Makes the Best Faces While Playing Cricket in Heels

The Duchess got game.

Kate Middleton doesn’t let a gorgeous red peplum get in the way of a good game of cricket. The Duchess may have forgotten her gym bag at home with her Latin notebook, but unlike the rest of us, she didn’t sit around playing M*A*S*H in the locker room with Becca from Spanish class.

She still made a face at having to do sports in heels in front of a bunch of people.

The Duke And Duchess Of Cambridge Tour Australia And New Zealand - Day 8
CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND – APRIL 14: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge bats during a game of cricket in Latimer Square on April 14, 2014 in Christchurch, New Zealand. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are on a three-week tour of Australia and New Zealand, the first official trip overseas with their son, Prince George of Cambridge. (Photo by Samir Hussein/WireImage) Samir Hussein—WireImage

But because she’s a Duchess (and an athlete) she was able to pull it together:

The Duke And Duchess Of Cambridge Tour Australia And New Zealand - Day 8
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge bats during a game of cricket in Latimer Square on April 14, 2014 in Christchurch, New Zealand. Samir Hussein—WireImage

It helps that she’s able to control the ball with her eyes because she’s royal.

The Duke And Duchess Of Cambridge Tour Australia And New Zealand - Day 8
The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge travel to Christchurch, New Zealand and played cricket with local children. Photograph by Ian Jones ©2014. Pool—Getty Images
TIME Style

VIDEO: Tom Ford Says He’s Married

Ford married journalist Richard Buckley, his partner of 27 years

+ READ ARTICLE

Designer Tom Ford is now sporting a gold wedding band, but somehow no one noticed until he nonchalantly showed it to the audience during an interview Monday at the London Apple Store.

“Richard, yes, 27 years, and we’re now married, which is nice,” Ford said.

He was referring to his long-term partner journalist Richard Buckley, with whom he shares a one-year-old son.

The couple met at a fashion show in the ’80s when Ford’s career was just beginning and Buckley was an editor at Vogue. The two have been together since.

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