MONEY Budgeting

Americans Spend More on Taxes Than Food, Clothing and Shelter Combined

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Getty Images

The surprising math on how we spend

Every year, the Tax Foundation compares the total amount of taxes paid in America and the amount of spending on the necessities of food, clothing, and shelter. In most recent years, the Tax Foundation has concluded that Americans spend more on taxes than on necessities — and 2015 is no different.

The Tax Foundation projections show a total of $4.85 trillion in taxes paid in 2015, divided between $3.28 trillion in federal taxes and $1.57 trillion collected at the state and local level. According to the Tax Foundation, total taxes are approximately 31% of the national income. Using data available from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), the Tax Foundation calculated approximately $4.3 trillion in spending for the basics with food at around $1.8 trillion, clothing at $0.3 trillion, and housing at $2.2 trillion.

Here’s the real question: Is this spending comparison indicative of a problem or of a correct and equitable tax structure? Should any of us be outraged? Probably not, although there are reasons for concern.

Certainly, the trend is not promising. The gap between taxes and spending on the essentials in 2012 was approximately $150 billion, rising to almost $300 billion in 2014 and around $550 billion in 2015. It’s hard to spin that as a positive development.

The Tax Foundation’s report also says nothing about equity of taxes and spending. Certainly, the Tax Foundation can leave the impression that taxes are too high for all Americans by using aggregate values. More progressive sites such as the Center on Budget and Priority Policies (CBPP) call these values misleading, pointing out that with our progressive tax system, poorer Americans clearly pay a greater share of their income for the essentials and less in taxes.

Meanwhile, the wealthy pay more in taxes and while they may make more discretionary purchases in food, clothing and shelter, it isn’t enough to make up the difference. Therefore the “average” (middle-class) American probably does not pay more in taxes than for the basics, and the lower income levels certainly do not.

This conclusion implies a higher amount of wealth transfer to help lower-income Americans with spending on their basics. Indeed, a graph created by the Tax Foundation shows a steady rise in transfer payments as a percentage of the cost of living, from 0.5% to nearly 35% in 2011. The Tax Foundation acknowledges some double-counting inflating the value, but the trend is still valid.

This illuminating graph and other explanations may be found in a 2012 article on the Tax Foundation website. For example, the amount spent on taxes was roughly equal to that spent on food, clothing and shelter from 1929 until the 1990’s, when the divergence began. Since then, taxes have increased disproportionately in a sawtooth pattern, with dips corresponding to economic crashes (2001 and 2007-2009).

If you have a budget — and you should have if you don’t — you can certainly figure out whether or not you paid more in taxes than you did in 2014, and can probably make a good estimate for 2015. What you do with that information is up to you.

You may well conclude that you pay too much in taxes, but use the exercise as an opportunity to analyze your spending on the basics. Are you getting the best value out of your dollar for your food, clothing, and housing payments? We’ll just ignore the subject of whether you’re getting your money’s worth out of your taxes. Save your outrage for that topic.

More From MoneyTips:

MONEY Economy

5 Reasons Cheap Gas Isn’t Fueling Consumer Spending

Getty Images/Tom Merton

Why you're just not feeling that confident.

The American consumer is difficult to figure out these days.

We currently enjoy substantial, if not strong, tailwinds. Despite a recent hiccup, employment numbers are improving, and wage growth has (kinda sorta) started to kick in. While gas prices have crept up a bit lately, drivers will most likely spend hundreds less at the pump this year than last. And a strong dollar has improved our purchasing power overseas.

Nevertheless, Americans are not translating these positives into more spending—except perhaps at bars (more on that below). And readings of how people feel about the economy and their stake in it are all over the map.

To demonstrate, here’s a snapshot of how consumers are behaving in five key areas:

Spending Is Flat

Last week the Commerce Department announced that retail sales were flat in April, and up only 0.9% from the year before. That’s the smallest year-over-year increase since the fall of 2009. The economy struggled in the first few months of 2015, with GDP increasing by just 0.2%, which economists blamed on, among other things, severe winter weather. But the poor retail figures in April make the bad weather theory a bit less compelling.

One area of the economy that’s seeing lots of cash? The service sector. Spending at bars and restaurants has boomed lately. “It is clear that this is the place where U.S. consumers are spending some of the money they are saving by buying cheaper gasoline,” per Wells Fargo Securities senior economist Eugenio Alemán.

Saving Is Up

In the years leading up to the financial crisis, Americans’ personal savings rate—a ratio of savings to disposable income—bounced between 2% and 3%. These days it’s up to 5.3%. Moreover, household debt relative to GDP has fallen dramatically since the end of the recession. My spending is your income, and vice versa, so more savings and less debt can limit wage growth for workers.

Confidence Is Iffy

All of the above has led to a lot of noise when it comes to gauging the economy’s animal spirits. Consumer sentiment recently hit a seven-month low, as the initial cheap gas sugar high faded. Gallup’s economic confidence index has dipped lately, too, and rests in negative territory. That said, surveys show substantial improvement from a year ago. A recent Bankrate poll, for example, found that only 16% of Americans say their financial situation has deteriorated over the past 12 months, down from 35% in August 2011.

And while you’re paying more at the pump than a couple of months ago, prices are still much lower than last year. The Energy Department estimates that you’ll spend almost $700 less in gasoline, making this summer look to be the least expensive for car travel since 2009. That should boost household confidence a bit.

More People Are Quitting

Though the quit rate has held relatively steady this year, people are quitting their jobs at much higher rates than in the years following the recession, which suggests they are feeling good about their ability to land a new gig. With good reason: The jobs picture is pretty healthy despite a lackluster report in March. Employers have added roughly a quarter-million jobs a month since 2014, and the unemployment rate has dropped to 5.4%. Still, for many people there’s one major thing holding them back.

Wages Are Stagnant

What’s missing is wage growth. Median household income is still well below pre-recession levels, and wage increases have hovered around 2%, which is only slightly more than inflation. That’s pretty abysmal, so it’s not difficult to see why households might be cautiously optimistic in the face of good news—i.e. lower gas prices.

One silver lining can be found in a gauge called Employment Cost Index, which measures benefits as well as salary. The ECI rose 2.6% in the first three months of 2015 compared with 12 months ago. Per the Labor Department, that’s the best showing since the end of 2008. While it’s still in the early days, workers may be in for the raises they so desperately need.

MONEY Odd Spending

Mother’s Day is Big Business for Everyone…Including Hooters

With Mother's Day spending expected to top $20 billion this year, here's the holiday by the numbers.

MONEY Family

Here’s What Your Mom Really Wants for Mother’s Day This Year

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Getty Images

The best part: It won't cost you anything.

Forget buying flowers or jewelry or making reservations at that fancy brunch spot. While your mother or wife might be happy to receive these tokens of affection, what she really craves on this day meant to celebrate mothers is a day off from being the mom.

So put that $170 back in your wallet (that’s the average amount people plan to spend on Mother’s Day) and roll up your sleeves. Here, according to popular mom bloggers we consulted, are the ingredients for a perfect day. Try them at your house.

Let Mom Sleep Late

“I’m still a pretty new mom, and the thing that I would appreciate the most is the gift of sleep. If my husband gave me a few ‘sleep-in’ coupons that I could cash in whenever I wanted, I would be completely overjoyed. It wouldn’t cost him a cent, and I would be so grateful.” —Anna Newell Jones, andthenwesaved.com

Take Over the Cleaning

“I want a laundry fairy to swing by the house and wash, dry, fold and put away all of the clothes (especially mine)” —Anna Luther, mylifeandkids.com

“My ideal Mother’s Day gift would be my family all pitching in together to clean up the house, do the dishes, fold and put away the laundry, and make me something yummy to eat while I took a bubble bath or read a good book.” — Crystal Paine, moneysavingmom.com

“Aside from the little sweet, self-made gifts from my toddlers (which I love), the Mother’s Day gift I want the most is a self-cleaning house. Like a Roomba, but it would clean every facet of our place. I’d never have to clean again! And I would be the happiest mama in the world! I would settle for no cleaning for a week though, or even a day.” —Alana Pace, parentingfromtheheartblog.com

Close the Kitchen

“I want a day off in the kitchen. No making 17 breakfasts (for three kids) and 22 snacks and a lunch that no one but the dog will eat.” —Anna Luther, mylifeandkids.com

“The best gift I have received for Mother’s Day was a surprise family picnic by the river. I didn’t have to worry about any of the planning. My husband had the car packed with blankets and food and drinks and towels. The kids were all ready to go and had swim suits and sunblock and cards they had made for me. All I had to do was relax and enjoy a day outside.” —Scarlet Paolicchi, familyfocusblog.com

“I want to finish the day with a dinner out, so not only can I be cooked for, I don’t have to clean up a tornado size mess in my kitchen.”—April McCormick, firsttimemomanddad.com

Leave Her Alone

“Prior to becoming a mother, I thought Mother’s Day was all about showering mom with love, hugs, and kisses, while following her around all day. Oh, how wrong I was. Now that I’m a mother, I’ve realized that’s the last thing I want. For Mother’s Day, I want to finish a cup of coffee, without any interruptions. I want to sit in a lawn chair and read a good book for more than five minutes, without any interruptions. Mother’s Day is the one day of the year that mothers deserve to be appreciated for all they do, without having to do anything, or be bothered by anyone.”—April McCormick, firsttimemomanddad.com

“As a stay-at-home mom the greatest gift my husband can give me is time to myself. I want to go into a store and shop without having to worry about leaving when a battle of wills breaks out between me and my preschooler. I want to slip into a quiet corner of a coffee shop with my E-reader and an iced caramel macchiato. I want just a few minutes to let my mind rest from the constant awareness of where my child is and what he is doing. When my husband gives me time off of my mom duties, he’s speaking straight to my heart. More importantly, I come back refreshed and can give my family the best version of me.” —Kim Anderson, thriftylittlemom.com

“I want to do all the stuff I used to do when I wasn’t a mom. I want to know where all my stuff is, listen to music with swears in it, take an uninterrupted shower, an uninterrupted nap, start drinking at 4 pm, stay up way past my bedtime, and sleep until I felt like it the following morning. Now that would be the ultimate Mother’s Day gift.” — Susie Johnson, not-your-average-mom.com

MONEY

One-Third of Americans Are Making This Silly Financial Mistake

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SuperStock

And it could cost them money.

Didn’t check your credit report this past year? Or ever? You’re not alone.

Despite having access to one free credit report a year from each of the three major credit agencies, 35% of Americans chose not to monitor their report, according to a survey released today by Bankrate.com. Two age groups particularly averse to ever requesting credit reports are senior citizens (44%) and millennials (41%). Moreover, about one-seventh of adults wait more than a year between credit checks.

Of course this is silly behavior. After all, you are entitled to a free credit report from TransUnion, Equifax and Experian, and can receive one by going to AnnualCreditReport.com. And a credit report is important: It’s a history of your interaction with all kinds of credit operations and is a guide by which your bank, boss, and others will gauge your ability to deal with debt. If you consistently pay your credit card late, or miss a mortgage payment here or there, that’ll show up on your report. Your credit score is derived from the information on your report, and your credit score helps to determine how much interest you’ll incur when you borrow money. So a mistaken report can cost you serious money. Errors are not altogether rare, per a 2013 FTC study, which found that 5% consumers had incorrect information on one of their credit reports.

To get a sense of how much mistakes can potentially cost you, check out this cost of debt calculator by Credit.com. A New York man in his late-30’s with fair credit will spend around $603,000 on interest payments over his lifetime. That same man with good credit will spend around $80,000 less. Mistakes on your credit report can lead to lower credit scores, and are likely to blight your credit history unless you take action. Which will be hard to do unless you check your report.

 

MONEY couples and money

How to Get Your Tightwad Spouse to Loosen Up

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Chris Gash

If you've ever felt frustrated by your partner's frugality, try these 4 tactics for untying the family purse strings.

Lauren Greutman’s couponing began as a practical way to trim her family’s household budget, but the Oswego, N.Y., mom’s mission to save quickly escalated to the point where she wouldn’t buy anything that wasn’t at a deep discount. “I went overboard,” she now admits.

Her husband, Mark, concurs—and says he frequently felt frustrated by her frugality. “There were many eye-roll moments,” he recalls not too fondly.

Perhaps you can empathize? When one spouse is more anxious than the other about spending, marital discord over money is pretty common. In fact, one study found that “tightwads” tend to marry “spendthrifts”—and those couples are 23% more likely to fight about money. “Everyday spending decisions can gnaw at them,” says study co-author Scott Rick, a professor of marketing at the University of Michigan. If your partner is economical to a fault, use these tips to pry open the wallet.

1. Find out what fuels the fire. Rather than passing judgment (again) on your spouse’s stinginess, discover what’s driving it. Break the ice with, “Honey, I’ve noticed that you are very conscious about our spending. Tell me what concerns you.” Is it a fear of going broke? Patterns learned as a kid? A countermeasure to your overspending? “The reason doesn’t necessarily justify the behavior, but if you can understand the fear or goal, you may be able to find a more agreeable way to address it,” says Brad Klontz, a psychologist in Lihue, Hawaii.

2. Look at the bigger picture. While you may never see eye-to-eye on spending, you’re likely to value similar financial goals, like retiring at 65 or going on vacation. From this common ground, analyze your finances to gain perspective on what’s rational (or not) when it comes to purchasing. “You can see where you have room for improvement or relaxation,” says Ed Coambs, a marriage counselor in Charlotte. Seeing where you stand may convince your spouse that spending $10 on lunch or $10,000 on a renovation isn’t apocalyptic—or may convince you that it is.

3. Request free rein day to day. Keep yourself from feeling hamstrung by your partner’s rules by asking him or her to allow you a splurge limit—say, $200 a month or 5% of each paycheck. That way you have limited license to spend as you wish, no questions asked.

4. Put a price on penny pinching. At the same time, help your frugal spouse do a cost-benefit analysis of his or her deal hunting. You might show how driving around to gas stations to save 3¢ a gallon actually wastes money. Or help your partner assess the hourly wage of cost cutting, as Lauren now does with couponing. “If I spend two hours a week and save $50,” she says, “then I feel it was worth my time.”

More Love & Money:
How to Tell If Combining Finances With Your Partner Is a Bad Idea
A Simple Rule for Raising Unspoiled Kids
How Well Do You Know Your Spouse’s Financial Habits?

Farnoosh Torabi is a contributing editor at Money Magazine and the author of When She Makes More: 10 Rules for Breadwinning Women. Her new podcast So Money features intimate interviews with leading entrepreneurs, authors and influencers. Visit SoMoneyPodcast.com.

MONEY credit cards

3 Things Millennials Need to Know When Choosing a Credit Card

hand choosing credit cards from a fan of cards
David Malan—Getty Images

Here's what young adults should consider when they finally bite the bullet and sign up for a credit card.

Today’s young professionals have a complicated relationship with credit. A report last year found that more than three in five millennials did not own a credit card, while another survey, by Creditcards.com, found that 36% of 18-to-29 year olds have never had one.

Millennials, of course, had the distinct misfortune of entering the job market during the greatest recession in generations, which may have made the prospect of borrowing less appealing, says Creditcards.com senior industry analyst Matt Schulz. Unemployment can make the task of paying off your monthly bill rather onerous.

Nevertheless, those in Gen Y who eschew plastic endure real costs that can make borrowing later in life that much more difficult. “Credit scoring models look at the age of your credit history,” says Credit.com’s Gerri Detweiler. “Specifically they take into account the age of your oldest account, and the average age of all of your accounts.” The earlier you start, the better your score will be. And a higher credit score can save you thousands over the course of your life.

If you’re ready to take the plunge, here are three things to consider when you pick and use your plastic. (These are also good reminders for those who already carry a card.) Remember, credit cards are tools and can dramatically improve your bottom line when used correctly.

1. Make sure you reap the credit

One chief benefit of receiving a card is proving to the world that you can be responsible with credit. However, if your lender doesn’t actually report your pristine credit behavior to a credit bureau, you won’t get the benefit of a higher score. “Ensure that your card reports account activity to the three major credit bureaus—which it should if it’s issued by a major bank and is a Visa, Mastercard, or American Express card—so that this first card can help build a credit history,” says Ben Woolsey of CreditCardForum.com. You can confirm this with your lender before you sign up for the card.

2. Skip the annual fee

“Get a credit card with no annual fee, since the first card you will get will be the card you keep the rest of your life to maintain a long credit history,” says Nerdwallet.com’s Kevin Yuann. The point here is that you don’t want to be penalized for establishing credit. But when you finally get that more elite card, don’t get rid of the original. “As you start to qualify for better rewards, keep a phone bill or something recurring on automatic payment on this card to ensure it doesn’t get canceled,” Yuann advises.

3. Pay your bill

“Many millennials incorrectly focus on the potential interest rate when shopping for their first card,” says CreditSesame.com’s John Ulzheimer. “This underscores a larger problem, which is that they are thinking about the cost of carrying a balance before they’ve even used their first card.”

Instead Ulzheimer recommends you consider other factors, like potential credit limit. (Aim to spend roughly 10%-20% of your monthly limit in order to optimize your score, which is a bit easier with a higher limit.) “Using the card only to the extent that they can pay off the balance in full each month makes the interest rate irrelevant.”

Still, credit cards are useful in cases of emergency, and sometimes you may find yourself with a revolving balance. That shouldn’t stop you from contributing something to your debt, says LowCards.com’s Bill Hardekopf. “Even if you can’t pay off the entire balance, it is critical to make the payment on time every single month. If not, this will significantly damage your credit score. That is something that will haunt you on future loans,” such as for a car or house.

Need help figuring out which card is right for you? Check out MONEY’s credit card matchmaker tool.

Read next: MONEY’s Best Credit Cards

MONEY Taxes

Is Your Tax Refund Too Big?

massive amount of cash in pocket
William Howell—iStock

Getting a big check from the IRS is exciting, but it might not be the best for your long-term financial health.

Taxpayers getting back money from the government this year have received an average refund of $2,893 so far, according to March 26 data from the Internal Revenue Service. That’s a nice bump up in cash flow, and a lot of people look forward to it as a chance to splurge, pay down debt or add to their savings.

But those people could have had that money all year, had they withheld less of their paycheck. Getting a big refund means you essentially gave the government an interest-free loan, when you could have put the money in a savings or retirement account to earn interest. You may see that money as a windfall, but you should really see it as the government making good on a year-long IOU.

There’s no right or wrong answer to how much of a refund you should aim to get, because it’s very much a matter of personal preference, and it can also be tricky to estimate. No matter how you choose to deal with your taxes, it’s worthwhile to regularly evaluate your withholdings. Here’s why.

Your Life Changes

About 82% of taxpayers receive refunds, but even if you’ve consistently gotten one, a significant life change may affect how much you receive or if you get one at all. Marriage, divorce, the birth or adoption of a child, or a drastic income change should trigger a review of how much you have withheld from your paycheck.

You Should Look for Patterns

Beyond re-evaluating your tax situation in the wake of a noteworthy life event, your tax-filing history will give you a good idea of when you should consider changing how much is withheld from your paycheck. It can be a difficult thing to estimate, because as much as you want may want to avoid owing the Internal Revenue Service in April, getting too much in return may not be the best for your long-term financial health.

“A good place to be is owing a little bit or getting a little bit back,” said Elliott Freirich, a certified public accountant in Chicago. But where exactly is that “good place”? “There’s no right answer. It’s a gray area, but I would tell people if they could kind of keep (their refund) under $1,000. … It’s not like it would go away and they would never have it if they reduce their withholding.”

Know Your Own Saving/Spending Habits

Some people feel that way — that they wouldn’t be disciplined enough to set aside the money they would otherwise get from a large refund.

“It’s sort of like forced savings,” said Jorie Johnson, a certified financial planner in New Jersey. She said she suggests her clients re-evaluate their withholding if their refund exceeds $5,000. “I encourage them to use half of their refund toward their IRA, if they haven’t already maxed it out, and the other half on themselves, as a reward — that’s assuming they don’t have any debt.”

Consider the big picture: Do you look forward to a large tax refund but struggle to meet your savings goals on a monthly basis? If you’re trying to work your way out of debt or regularly find yourself financing your lifestyle while also getting a large refund check every tax season, that’s a sign you need to revisit your withholding (you might need to re-evaluate your spending habits, too).

Remember that withholding is just an estimate of what you’ll owe, and it may take you a few years of consistent tax outcomes to confidently adjust that estimate to meet your tax needs without owing or receiving a large sum come tax time.

More from Credit.com

This article originally appeared on Credit.com.

MONEY Sports

4 Ways to Beat the High Cost of Bicycling

bicycle riders
Gallery Stock

Becoming an avid biker can be good for your health. But between the gear and the outfits, you could find yourself spending an unhealthy amount of money.

If you want to ask Jonathan Cane what he loves most about cycling, you might have some trouble catching up with him.

Chances are, the 51-year-old triathlon coach will be pedaling at 20 miles per hour on his Trek Domane, deep in the forests of New York’s Harriman State Park or alongside the cliffs of the New Jersey Palisades.

“There’s something nice and pure about being on two wheels,” says Cane, a Harlem resident who typically rides around 100 miles a week. “It’s like being a kid and getting on your bike for the first time.”

In fact, for many, cycling is not just a pastime—it’s something of an addiction. And it can be expensive.

Americans spent $2.3 billion on bicycles in 2013, up 4% from the year before, according to the National Sporting Goods Association. Meanwhile, also in 2013, we spent $188 million on helmets, $669 million on apparel, and even $75 million on special bike shoes.

When you separate out enthusiasts who ride an average of 140 miles a month, they spent an average of $1,622 on a new bike in 2014, according to the American Bicyclist Study from consulting firm Gluskin Townley Group.

Even if you subtract the bike itself, top biking buffs still forked out an average of $1,659 on other bicycling-related products.

All those lofty numbers don’t surprise Jonathan Cane at all. “If you see a pack of 50 guys racing around the park, that’s probably a quarter of a million dollars worth of bikes right there,” he says.

Throw in maintenance, other accessories like gloves and gear, along with a few race entries here and there, and you’re very easily looking at over $1,000 a year, he says.

Ben Davidson, an artist from British Columbia, Canada, spent almost $10,000 on his cycling habit in the past year, purchasing two bikes and doing a 1,000-mile charity ride for a children’s hospital.

“I’m not the best person to ask about saving money on bikes,” Davidson says. “It’s the one thing I love to spend money on.”

Thanks to a spike in city living, plus growing amenities for cyclists like bike lanes and European-style rideshare programs, there are more bike aficionados like Cane and Davidson than ever: The number of bike commuters grew by 40% between 2000 and 2010, according to the Sierra Club.

But you don’t have to go broke in the process. Here are a few strategies to cut your cycling costs.

1. Buy used

If you don’t know the first thing about bicycle mechanics, it probably makes sense to buy new, along with the manufacturer warrantees and routine maintenance checks.

If you’re handy, and want to save potentially hundreds or even thousands of dollars, there is no shame in buying a used bike.

In fact, during the recent recession, used-bikes sales exploded, says Gluskin Townley Group co-founder Jay Townley, and now comprise around a quarter of the total market.

Local bike shops often act as exchanges for used bikes, and you can feel more secure about your purchase there, says Townley. For deeper discounts, check out eBay or Craigslist, but buyer beware.

2. Use timing to your advantage

As this epic winter finally recedes and racing season starts up, you can forget about getting amazing deals. Especially since top manufacturers are increasingly insistent on fixed pricing, says Townley.

But the end of the racing season, like October, is when riders typically sell bikes and gear as they plan ahead for next year. That’s when to pounce.

3. Forget top-of-the-line

Yes, you could certainly spend $5,000 on an ultralight racing bike that will have your buddies drooling.

Unless you’re Olympics-bound, take it down a notch and get a perfectly excellent high-performance bike for $2,000 or less. If one pricey bike weighs two pounds less than a cheaper alternative, why not just lose two pounds yourself and save thousands of dollars, asks Cane.

4. Be immune to peer pressure

Some bike stores are rather snobbish, Cane says, and won’t give you the time of day unless you’re a muscled Adonis who’s ready to pay for the most elite gear.

Forget them, and stick to your budget. In fact, if you have a friend who’s an experienced rider, bring him or her along for any shopping excursions. They will know the lingo, what you really need and what you don’t, and won’t let you get bamboozled by salespeople who are just salivating over fat commissions.

TIME Aviation

Here’s How Much Spare Change the TSA Collected Last Year

People are leaving more and more coins behind at screening points

Harried travelers are increasingly leaving their nickels and dimes in the bins used during airport security screenings, which has led to a growing source of revenue for the Transportation Security Administration.

In the fiscal year 2014, the TSA collected almost $675,000 in loose change, according to the agency’s internal data, up from $638,000 in fiscal year 2013. The amount of money collected has been steadily increasing since 2010, even though Americans are increasingly reliant on digital payment methods rather than cash. Overall, the agency has collected about $3.5 million in loose change since 2008. The cash is used to fund TSA security operations.

Fliers at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport left the most change behind, $43,000. Los Angeles International Airport ranked second at $42,000 and San Francisco International Airport ranked third at $35,000.

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