TIME National Monuments

84 Years Later: The Making of Mount Rushmore

The memorial that immortalized four presidents took more than a decade to carve out of the rock. But on July 4th, 1930, in the early days of construction, a dedication was held for the head of George Washington.

The Danish-American sculptor Gutzon Borglum began carving the heads of four presidents out of South Dakota’s Mount Rushmore in 1927, embarking on an ambitious project to build one of America’s most iconic memorials. Today, the heads of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt attract more than 2 million visitors every year.

But construction was predictably laborious, and Borglum died in 1941 before he could see his project finished. His son, Lincoln Borglum, completed the sculpture later that year. Today, on the 84th anniversary of the Fourth of July dedication of Washington’s head in the early years of carving, TIME looks back at the construction of the memorial that immortalized four presidents.

TIME States

For $400,000 You Can Be a Town’s Owner, and its Bartender

A road marker highlights Swett, S.D.'s small borders on June 26, 2014.
A road marker highlights Swett, S.D.'s small borders on June 26, 2014. Eric Ginnard—AP

The entire town of Swett, South Dakota is up for sale, and there's a bar included

Ever wished your local bar was a little less crowded? Well wish no more. For a mere $400,000 you can become the proud owner of a bar, and the one-man town it’s based in, the Associated Press reports.

Lance Benson, a wealthy businessman, has put the town of Swett, S.D. up for sale. Benson bought the hamlet in 1998, lost it in a divorce and reclaimed it in 2012. Now he’s looking for a buyer so he can spend more time on his business.

The new owner of Swett will inherit a workshop, three trailers, Benson’s house, and, of course, the bar. Though the town is uninhabited, solitary drinkers need not make an offer. The Swett Tavern is the bar of choice for local cowboys and farmers within a 10-mile radius.

Gerry Runnels, a patron of the bar commented: “This place is pretty much where the highway ends and the Wild West begins.”

Benson put the town on the market last week, though a new proprietor is yet to be found. Its current owner isn’t too bothered though. Benson said if Swett doesn’t sell in a year, he’ll keep it.

[AP]

TIME weather

Baseball-Size Hail Rains Down on Nebraska as Thunderstorms Inundate Midwest

Severe Weather
A car with its windows damaged by hail hangs over a creek following a severe thunderstorm in Blair, Neb., Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Nati Harnik—AP

Wild weather sweeps across the Midwest

Hard rain and hailstones inundated large swaths of the Great Plains on Tuesday as officials issued tornado watches in Nebraska that will continue late into the evening in the Cornhusker State.

“Storms may contain very heavy rain, large hail and a few tornadoes,” warned the National Weather Service in a bulletin posted on its website on Tuesday.

Baseball-size hail reportedly fell across northeast Nebraska on Tuesday, causing extensive damage.

The hail knocked out car windshields in affected areas, while the roof of at least one hotel in Missouri Valley, Iowa, was ripped off by high winds, according to CNN.

The National Weather Service predicted that another string of heavy thunderstorms is likely to move across the heartland from the Texas panhandle to western South Dakota on Wednesday.

TIME politics

GOP Senate Candidate Declares War on Sexism: ‘Our Country Has a Problem’

Conservative women fight back

A Republican Senate candidate from South Dakota has a message for the people calling her vulgar names on the Internet: conservative women fight back. Annette Bosworth, a current state Representative and medical doctor, held a press conference Tuesday openly condemning the misogyny she says she’s encountered throughout her campaign for the U.S. Senate, largely at the hands of “supposedly tolerant liberals.” Bosworth’s passionate diatribe hit a nerve at a moment when much of the country is turning its attention to misogyny in the wake of a mass killing in California, where a young man stabbed and shot his way through a college town, driven by his sexist views.

“Good morning, and welcome to the state of political discourse in 2014, “ Bosworth said while standing in a profane graffiti-covered room. She called the exhibit a representation of what’s facing women who “dare to challenge the status quo.”

“What you see around you are the words which have been written about me on blogs, on the Internet throughout this campaign,” Bosworth said. “They are hateful, they are hurtful and no person should have to endure it. It is its own form of abuse.”

Bosworth, who is challenging former Gov. Mike Rounds in the upcoming June primary, said she asked local artists to Google her and “pick a name. Spell it just as it’s spelled on the Internet and represent that on my campaign signs.”

“The Democrats talk about a war on women, but much of what you see is written by the supposedly tolerant liberals. Their message is clear: conservative women are fair game. If you are a female and a Republican, anything goes. Look at these signs. Look at the messages sent by our country. We have a problem, and it’s not being talked about.”

She called attention to the Santa Barbara massacre:

“I would like you to try and find a word that correlates to that in a man with the same connotation and the same disrespect that when their children Google it, it makes them cry. The misogyny is real. Go to the shootings in California. Look around. South Dakota is not unique. Our country has a problem.”

She may be considered a “long-shot” as a Senate candidate, but her powerful stance against the vulgarity sends a much needed, powerful message to hatemongers: enough is enough.

Watch the full video at Talking Points Memo.

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