TIME 2014 Election

South Carolina Congressional Candidate Calls Gay Couples ‘Gremlins’

“They’re these creatures that are so destructive," Anthony Culler said

A South Carolina Congressional candidate called same-sex couples “gremlins” out to “destroy our way of life” in a seven-minute Facebook video released Monday.

The video followed a lengthy statement the candidate posted to Facebook on Oct. 14 urging South Carolina voters to stand with him if they were for traditional marriage. “I made a comment that same-sex couples that want to destroy traditional marriage and our way of life, they’re gremlins,” said Republican Anthony Culler, who is challenging incumbent Democratic Rep. James Clyburn. “They’re these creatures that are so destructive.”

Culler went on say that while the 6th District where he’s challenging Clyburn is often referred to as “the black district” he believes it’s also a “Christian district” where many people share views like his.

“The people here—black, white, Democrat, Republican—we believe in family,” Culler said. “We believe in traditional family. We believe in the way that is has always been: one man, one woman. Government can make up any laws it wants to, it doesn’t make it right. Evil is evil. Wrong is wrong. “

The Republican has almost no chance of beating the 11-term congressman in the strongly Democratic district. The state Republican Party denounced Culler’s statements, saying “most people learned in kindergarten not to call other people names.”

“Our party believes in the conservative definition of marriage, but we also believe in loving our neighbors and treating them with respect,” South Carolina GOP chairman Matt Moore said. “Mr. Culler’s desperate, attention-seeking antics in no way represent the good, decent South Carolinians I’ve met across our state.”

TIME 2014 Election

On the Road with Rand Paul

Can he fix what ails the GOP?

The tattooed and pierced longhairs never showed up to see Senator Rand Paul speak with students at the University of South Carolina in Columbia last month. Those in attendance drew instead from the preppy set, with brushed bangs, blue blazers and proper hemlines, some wearing sunglasses on neck straps like jock jewelry. They mostly hailed from college Republican circles, and the room where they gathered, a wood-stained memorial to the state’s old power structure, was named for the politician who led the fight to protect school segregation in the 1960s.

You could call them activists, even rebels in their way. But this was not a gathering of losers and outcasts. Paul knew this. And that was the whole point…

Read the full story here.

TIME celebrity

Bill Murray Crashed Another Party and This Time He Danced to ‘Turn Down For What’

Another day, another instance of Bill Murray being ridiculously candid and awesome

Bill Murray is quickly becoming one of the most prolific party crashers of his generation. This weekend, he showed up at a birthday celebration in the suburbs of Charleston, South Carolina, and, of course, was totally the life of the party.

As always, the details of why and how Murray ended up at this gathering are a bit hazy. According to the Post and Courier, the actor’s invitation came from Marvin Larry Reynolds, who hosted the party. Charleston chef Bret McKee, who the Post and Courier describes as Murray’s “long-time friend,” catered the event and was kind enough to share photos and videos on Facebook.

Here he is at the head of the table:

Here he is dancing to “867-5309/Jenny”:

And also “Turn Down For What”:

And then, since Murray’s own birthday is coming up (he’s turning 64 on Sep. 21), he blew out some candles:

The actor owns a home in Charleston and it seems like he’s been spending a decent chunk of his time there recently, so if you’re in the area, keep your eyes peeled. He could be anywhere. Though if you see him, no one will ever believe you.

TIME South Carolina

Mark Sanford’s Ex-Fiancée Surprised by Facebook Breakup Post

U.S. Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., discusses his first months back in Congress during an Associated Press interview in his district office in Mount Pleasant, S.C. on Dec. 18, 2013.
Congressman Mark Sanford discusses his first months back in Congress during an interview in his district office in Mount Pleasant, S.C., on Dec. 18, 2013 Bruce Smith—AP

María Belén Chapur learned about South Carolina politician's Facebook breakup post the same way the rest of us did

When Republican South Carolina Congressman Mark Sanford announced the end of his engagement to the Argentine woman with whom he had an affair five years ago, it didn’t just surprise his constituents — it also surprised his now ex-fiancée, María Belén Chapur.

Chapur says she learned about the announcement at the same time the rest of the world did, according to an interview with the New York Times. Though she had asked Sanford to make their breakup public, Chapur says she wasn’t given any warning about the lengthy, 2,346-word Facebook update he posted that discussed the strain his child-custody battle with his ex-wife Jenny Sanford put on their relationship.

“I learned it from the press today,” Chapur told the paper Saturday. She says the relationship fell apart partly over disputes about setting a wedding date and how she did not “want to continue in the category of mistress.” Chapur disagreed with Sanford’s explanation for their split and said that he should not “leave blame on Jenny.”

In 2009, Sanford’s staff infamously claimed the politician, then South Carolina governor, was hiking the Appalachian trail when he went mysteriously absent from office. Sanford later admitted he was visiting Chapur in Argentina.

TIME Crime

Father of 5 Dead Children Faces Murder Charges

Timothy Ray Jones, Jr. is pictured at the Lexington County Detention Center in Lexington, South Carolina in this handout photo
Timothy Ray Jones, Jr. is pictured at the Lexington County Detention Center in Lexington, South Carolina in this September 11, 2014 handout photo. Handout —Reuters

Authorities allege Timothy Ray Jones killed his children "willfully and maliciously"

A South Carolina man has been extradited to his home state, and booked in connection with the deaths of his five children, after being arrested in Mississippi on Sept. 6.

Timothy Ray Jones, 32, was transported back to South Carolina on Thursday and booked into a jail in Lexington County, the Los Angeles Times reported. Jones was stopped at a checkpoint in Raleigh, Miss., six days ago on suspicion of drunk driving. The strong smell of chemicals from his car led police to investigate further, which led to the discovery of his children’s clothes along with blood.

On Tuesday, Jones led law-enforcement officers to a spot just off the Alabama highway where they found the bodies of his five children, aged 1 to 8, in plastic bags. Authorities told the Times they believe he drove almost 700 miles through four states before finally dumping the bodies in Alabama.

According to warrants, Jones will face five murder charges for allegedly “willfully and maliciously” killing his children in his Lexington home. He had primary custody of the children from his ex-wife, who reported them missing on Sept. 3.

Jones is expected to appear in court on Friday.

MONEY

How College Football Sacked the NBA and MLB

Houston football fans singing the National Anthem
Dave Einsel—AP

With the college football season upon us, it's time to take stock of just how valuable this "amateur" sport has become.

Want to know how rabid fans have become for college football?

Well, the season kicks off in earnest tonight when the South Carolina Gamecocks (ranked 9th in the country) take on the Texas A&M Aggies (ranked 21st).

The game will be played in Columbia, South Carolina, in front of 80,000 screaming fans — an amazing feat given that Columbia has a population of just 133,000. The Aggies, for their part, play in Kyle Field, which in 2015 will be able to hold almost every single College Station, Texas, resident.

Last year, the Gamecocks opened with a game against the University of North Carolina, and 3.7 million people across the country tuned in. That may not sound that impressive, but consider that Columbia is just the 77th largest television market in the U.S., behind cities like Omaha and Toledo.

There’s no doubt about it. Americans love football.

More people watched the NFL Sunday Night pregame show last year than watched the Boston Red Sox win the World Series. In fact, professional football games comprised all but four of the 50 most-watched sporting events of 2013. The National Football League is the most popular spectator sport in America.

What’s No. 2? Not the NBA, not Major League Baseball—but college football. And with college football introducing a new-fangled playoff system this year, expect America’s infatuation to only grow.

Here are a few measures of its influence.

Ratings

The 2013 NBA finals featured perhaps the most popular athlete in the world, Lebron James, as his super team battled against the San Antonio Spurs for seven unforgettable games. An average of almost 18 million viewers saw James secure his second NBA title. A few months later, 15 million baseball fans saw the Red Sox win their third championship since 2004.

How many viewers watched Florida State beat Auburn in the 2014 BCS title game? Twenty-six million, per Nielsen ratings.

This isn’t a one-off event. On average, 2.6 million people watched NCAA regular season football games last year, according to Nielsen. Take Saturday, October 5, 2013. Both the University of Georgia and Tennessee were enduring less than stellar seasons. Nevertheless, 5.6 million people tuned in to see the two Southeastern Conference schools play each another on CBS.

Viewer demand is only likely to increase. Starting this year, college football will institute a four-team playoff to decide the national champion, and rejiggered rules allow the biggest football programs more control over their finances. According to USA Today, these developments will lead to the biggest schools earning 71.5% of the $470 million annual television revenue for the playoff.

Baseball and basketball simply don’t attract as many eyeballs. About 700,000 people watched an MLB regular season game on television in 2013, and 1.4 million watched a non-playoff NBA game in the 2012-13 season. (All are based on nationally televised games.)

The total attendance for 835 NCAA Division I football games was a little more than 38 million, with a per-game attendance of 46,000. The NBA, which has almost 400 more total games in its season, drew 21 million people, while the MLB attracted 30,500 per game. (Major League Baseball has almost three times as many games and brought in a total of 74 million fans.)

Reach

Part of college football’s popularity might be its reach. While the NBA and MLB have 30 teams collected mostly around large metropolitan areas, college football programs exist where there are colleges – which is everywhere. Consider that New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco have 15 professional baseball and basketball teams. That’s a quarter of all the teams in only four cities.

Now look at NCAA football. The top five teams play in Tallahassee, Tuscaloosa, Eugene, Norman, and Columbus. While it’s true that a number of the West Coast schools play in big cities (UCLA, Stanford, and the University of Washington), most of the big-time schools are the only game in town. If you live in Boise, Idaho, do you really care about anything else the way you care about Boise State Broncos football?

Riches

There is something a bit unsettling about college football’s popularity, and corresponding affluence. A college football coach is the highest paid public employee in 27 states – including South Carolina and Texas. Alabama’s Nick Saban made more than $5.5 million last year, despite the fact that his and every other team’s players weren’t paid anything. (Many were given athletic scholarships, but those can be taken away if a “student-athlete” becomes injured. Just for some perspective: the University of Texas’s football program earned $82 million in profit last year.)

Plus, football is a dangerous game, and it’s an open question whether an institution of higher learning should even be in the business of promoting a sport that causes severe head trauma. (Google: Owen Thomas.)

College football, though, is inexorably linked to American history. The first intercollegiate game took place four years after the end of the Civil War, and the college game itself was saved by then President Teddy Roosevelt.

Otherwise normal, hard-working Americans revert to 20-year-old fanatics every fall Saturday afternoon and cheer on their alma maters. Tonight’s game in Columbia is just another page in the never-ending story of America’s love with her second-favorite sport.

MONEY Shopping

WATCH: Shop This Weekend and Escape the Sales Tax

Several states are suspending sales taxes to encourage shoppers to hit the stores.

TIME Food & Drink

The 24 Best Lobster Rolls in America

The Clam Shack J. Steven Kingston

In honor of National Lobster Day

Never mind the tired regional debate—whether they’re best Maine style (chilled, with mayonnaise) or Connecticut (warm, with drawn butter). Lobster rolls are delicious, and in addition to honoring the classic styles, seafood-obsessed chefs have embraced new possibilities. From a modern Asian spin with a charcoal-lacquered bun to a torpedo bun laden with a whole pound of meat, here are our favorites.

The Clam Shack

Kennebunkport, ME

Overlooking the scenic Kennebunk River, at the peak of the summer season, the cooks at the Clam Shack shell roughly 1,000 pounds of local lobster a day. For their assembled-to-order rolls, they pile a little of each part (claw, knuckle, tail) onto an oversize, locally baked burger bun. Customers choose between a swipe of mayo, a drizzle of warm butter or a little of both. The Clam Shack even sells lobster roll kits, shipped fresh overnight.

Neptune Oyster

Boston

This North End restaurant’s famous hot lobster roll features succulent pieces of lobster tail, claw and knuckle meat drizzled with clarified butter, served on a grilled and buttered brioche hot dog bun. A mayo-based cold roll is also available for purists.

MORE: 15 Epic Lobster Recipes

Bob’s Clam Hut

Kittery, ME

Bob’s Clam Hut hasn’t changed its lobster roll recipe in 50 years, for good reason: There’s no better way to serve their juicy chunks of Maine lobster than to toss them with a little mayonnaise and pack them into a grilled, buttered hot dog bun.

The Ordinary

Charleston, SC

Chef Mike Lata’s new seafood hall celebrates the “merroir” (ocean terroir) of the entire East Coast with a wide range of sustainably caught fish. His spin on the New England lobster roll includes a whopping half-pound of lobster meat bought straight off a Maine day boat. The mayo dressing is zingy with Tabasco, lemon, celery, garlic, mustard, chives, shallot and a light dusting of Old Bay.

Red Hook Lobster Pound

Brooklyn, NY

This food truck and storefront operation serves its Maine claw and knuckle meat rolls two ways: Maine style, with the lobster dressed in a lemony house-made mayo, or Connecticut style, the meat drizzled with melted butter. To keep things strictly New England, both versions come in a Country Kitchen-brand split-top bun from Maine.

READ THE FULL LIST HERE.

MORE: America’s Best Hot Dogs

MORE: Best Fried Chicken in the U.S.

MORE: Best Burgers in the U.S.

MORE: Best Ice Cream Spots in the U.S.

TIME celebrity

Bill Murray Pulled a Bill Murray and Crashed an Engagement Photo Shoot

This is becoming a second career for him

Apparently crashing a bachelor party was not enough to satisfy Bill Murray, so he decided to crash an engagement photoshoot too. You know, because he’s Bill Murray and this is simply the type of behavior we’ve all come to expect from him.

Lovebirds Ashley Donald and Erik Rogers were posing for their engagement photos in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, when their photographer, Raheel Gauba of Fia Forever Photography, noticed a commotion nearby. As he explained in a blog post:

I turn around and I see Mr. Murray standing there with his shirt pulled up and belly proudly on display which he is patting pretty loudly in an attempt to make the couple laugh – Needless to say I was stunned and I invited Mr. Murray to join the couple for a quick shot – He obliged and congratulated them and went on his way…

Lesson learned: if you want Bill Murray to be a part of your important life milestones, you need to start hanging out in Charleston.

TIME Crime

Loaded Gun Found in South Carolina Target’s Toys Section

Police are investigating how the firearm ended up in the aisle

A worker at a Target in South Carolina found a loaded gun in a toy aisle.

The employee at the Target in Myrtle Beach, S.C. told police that he saw the 9mm handgun on the shelf and at first thought it was a toy, before realizing it was fully loaded, The State reports. He said had seen a suspicious man walking around the toy section, though it’s unclear if he was the one who left the weapon.

Police are investigating and checking surveillance video to determine how the gun ended up there, according to The State. The gun has not been reported stolen.

[The State]

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