TIME apps

Tinder CEO Sean Rad Is Stepping Down

TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2014 - Day 3
Tinder Co-Founder and CEO Sean Rad speaks onstage at TechCrunch Disrupt at Pier 48 on Sept. 10, 2014 in San Francisco. Steve Jennings—Getty Images

IAC plans to replace Rad with “an Eric Schmidt-like person"

Tinder’s CEO Sean Rad is out of the top role at the dating app that he helped to found over two years ago, a report says.

The side-swiping application is majority-owned by Barry Diller’s IAC, which has plans to replace Rad with “an Eric Schmidt-like person,” reported Forbes. Rad will remain on Tinder’s board and will act as president once the new CEO comes on board. Until then, he will stay on as the acting chief executive.

Rad has faced a tumultuous year, despite helping the dating service log 600% growth over the past 12 months. A sexual harassment lawsuit that led to the ouster of Tinder Chief Marketing Officer Justin Mateen also cast a pall over Rad’s leadership.

Whitney Wolfe, a co-founder of the app who was forced out, accused Rad and Mateen of sexually harassing her. The suit was settled in September, but not before Mateen resigned.

Rad’s demotion comes as Tinder launches an aggressive new monetization initiative for the dating service. The premium service will be an option on top of the otherwise free application and is the company’s first attempt to generate cash flow from the service.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com

TIME social

How Facebook Uses Ad Feedback to Alter Your Timeline

A few years ago, Facebook rolled out functionality to all users that lets us hide advertisements we find objectionable. Many ignore this “I don’t want to see this” feature, hiding in the down arrow at the top right corner of the ad, because hidden advertisements are quickly replaced with new ones.

Some do click and give their reasons for reporting ads, however, giving Facebook a wealth of data about which ones users find objectionable. Facebook has taken to its official Newsroom blog to explain how the site now uses that feedback to making your experience on the social network better.

According to Facebook Product Manager Max Eulenstein, when people start reporting an ad, the site’s algorithm takes note and adjusts our News Feeds accordingly:

When testing this update, we looked at when people told us that ads were offensive or inappropriate and stopped showing those ads. As a result, we saw a significant decrease in the number of ads people reported as offensive or inappropriate. This means we were able to take signals from a small number of people on a small number of particularly bad ads to improve the ads everyone sees on Facebook.

This change means Facebook is collecting more data on you, but in this case, it may be a good thing. Each time you report an ad, Facebook also learns about the type of ads you, specifically, dislike. Once your ad profile is built, Facebook will intentionally avoid showing you ads it thinks “there is even a small chance” you might hide. The company says this change has already reduced the rate at which people hide ads by 30%.

Of course, this is only the latest “advertising innovation” to hit the social network. Last year, Techlicious revealed how Facebook algorithms stretch well beyond the boundaries of the site itself, collecting data on you even as you shop in supermarkets. And the site landed in hot water last year when it asserted the right to feature everyday users of the site, including minors and their photos, as unpaid endorsers in ads on the site.

This article was written by Fox Van Allen and originally appeared on Techlicious.

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TIME social

Facebook Is Testing Disappearing Status Updates

Wish that the status updates you want to share on Facebook weren’t so permanent? Soon, you may be able to make your posts on the social network vanish without a trace – after a set period of time of your choosing, of course. Similar to popular self-destructing message app SnapChat, your Facebook messages may soon have a limited lifespan of your choosing.

As reported by TheNextWeb, Facebook has begun rolling out these temporary status updates to a select group of users of its iOS smartphone app. Those who have access to the feature can select “expiration” times ranging from one hour to seven days. So if you want to talk about a TV episode, for example, you can have your discussion automatically disappear from your Timeline after it stops being relevant. That means less clutter and more focus on the more important events in your life that you have shared.

There’s always a catch with Facebook, though. The one here is that even though your messages can disappear in as soon as an hour, they’ll remain on the Facebook servers. And any information you share will likely still be mined for advertising data, so there’s that to consider when posting, too. Remember that anything you share on Facebook reveals a little bit more about your lifestyle, buying habits and interests.

If you don’t have access to the feature yet, you’ll have to be patient: Vanishing messages are only available as a “small pilot” program, according to Facebook, and only for iPhone, iPod and iPad app users. Still, if it proves both useful and successful, we could all see the functionality soon. Want to learn more about using Facebook? Check out these 5 biggest Facebook mistakes people make, then read up on social network etiquette. And be sure not to miss Techlicious’ updated guide to Facebook privacy settings.

This article was written by Fox Van Allen and originally appeared on Techlicious.

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TIME How-To

5 of the Biggest Facebook Mistakes (and How to Fix Them)

Facebook
Andrew Harrer -- Bloomberg / Getty Images

The world’s biggest social network turned 10 this year. With 57% of the American population — and 73% of teenagers — among its user base, Facebook has morphed from a way for college undergrads to communicate to a multi-tentacled service that has become an integral part of our everyday lives, from connecting us with long-lost friends to serving as the Internet’s de facto photo-sharing service to doubling as a universal login to thousands of sites and apps across the Internet.

But with regular introductions of privacy-flouting new features and different sets of etiquette for connecting with colleagues, friends and family, it can be all too easy to make a Facebook misstep that sends the wrong message into the world.

Below are five of the most-common Facebook faux pas – and how to avoid them.

1. Not putting a professional face forward

If you haven’t been keeping an eye on your privacy settings, photos and posts intended for friends can end up on your boss’s newsfeed. A CareerBuilder study found that nearly 39% of employers use social media to screen job candidates, and a 2012 report from technology research company Gartner predicted that by 2015, 60% of employers will be monitoring employees on social networks.

If your boss is your Facebook friend, you can prevent them from seeing what you post by going to Settings > Privacy > “Who can see my future posts,” selecting “Custom” from the dropdown menu and adding their names. To keep them from seeing posts and photos you’re tagged in, go to Settings > Timeline and tagging > “Who can see things on my timeline,” select Custom from the dropdown menu and add their names.

If your boss or potential employer isn’t your Facebook friend, simply go to Settings > Privacy then select “Friends only” as the audience for “Who can see my future posts” and “Limit past posts.” On the same page, you can also edit who can look you up — public, friends of friends, or friends only — and disable Google and other search engines from linking to your Facebook profile.

Finally, you can create a Restricted list — anyone on this list can only see the information and posts you make public. This can be an effective way to avoid looking suspiciously absent from Facebook, without giving up too much information. Head to Settings > Blocking, and edit “Restricted List.”

In all cases, if you and your boss have mutual friends, he or she will still be able to view any posts or photos you may be tagged in with those friends.

2. Oversharing, oversharing, oversharing

We’ve all done it, but now there’s proof that oversharing is the easiest way to get unfriended on Facebook. A study by Christopher Sibona at the University of Colorado Denver found that the top four reasons people delete friends are because their posts are frequent or trivial posts, polarizing, inappropriate or too mundane.

“Share things that are meaningful, witty, newsy or interesting — and be discriminating in how often you post on Facebook,” recommends Jessica Kleiman, a communications specialist and co-author of the book Be Your Own Best Publicist.

Still, that doesn’t mean there isn’t an audience for that polemic on national politics (or what you had for breakfast). If there are particular people you think would appreciate more controversial — or more mundane — statuses, you can customize the audience for individual posts. Below the status box, click the tab next to “Post” and select Custom to bring up options for “Who Should See This?”. You can then select a specific audience such as Close Friends, or a custom list (if you made one), say for your sports league. You can also select Custom and manually enter friends that can or can’t view the post. You can make this setting your default to avoid future oversharing.

However, Kleiman cautions, “Even if you use filters on Facebook to keep your posts only visible by ‘friends,’ one of your 850 closest friends online is probably friends with someone you wouldn’t want to see that post.”

3. Allowing Facebook apps to overshare for you

Along with posts about that ham and cheese toastie you were eating, oversharing may take the form of posts by apps you’ve linked to Facebook.

Privacy protection company Secure.me found that 63% of apps request the ability to post on the user’s behalf. While giving this permission may allow your info to be shared where it shouldn’t, more irking is the fact that, say, Spotify can post what ‘80s pop ballad you’re listening to, or Candy Crush Saga can update all your friends on your progress.

You can allow or disallow third-party apps to post to Facebook when signing up, but if you didn’t do that, you can edit all permissions from a single page. Select Activity Log from the top right dropdown menu on your profile or news feed, then All Apps (on the left) to view posts made by apps.

To prevent individual apps from posting, hit More (under All Apps), scroll to the offending app, then click the top-right arrow to customize where the app can post to on your behalf — certain friends, all friends, or not at all. You can also tweak the audience for each post by clicking its lock icon. Click the neighboring pen icon to remove the post from your Timeline, mark it as spam or delete the app from your Facebook profile entirely.

4. Allowing others to post content about you that you don’t like

A Pew Research Center survey found that one of the aspects users most disliked about Facebook was that friends can post personal content, such as photos, about a user without his or her permission.

If you’ve been tagged in an unflattering photo, you can remove the tag by clicking on the photo, hovering over its base, and selecting Options / Remove Tag, so that the picture will not turn up in “Photos of You.” To stop it from appearing on your profile page, you must separately toggle “Allow on Timeline” to “Hide from Timeline” in the top-right of the window. However, the photo can still be viewed in other people’s News Feeds and the poster’s albums page, so if you abhor the picture, contact your so-called friend and ask them to take it down.

You can also disable certain — or all — people from posting on your Timeline. Go to Settings > Timeline and Tagging > “Who can add things to my timeline” and select “Only Me.” *(Friends will still be able to view your Timeline.)

To block particular people, head to Settings > Blocking, and add the names to the Restricted list. Then go to Settings > Timeline and Tagging > “Who can add things to my Timeline,” and select “Friends.” Friends on the restricted list won’t be able to post on your Timeline, or view it unless you have set it to be public.

5. Being resigned to a boring news feed

Does it feel like you’re reading more and more posts from friends you don’t really care about? You’re probably not imagining it. In December, Facebook updated its News Feed algorithm to push up posts with links and push down memes. Links with more comments were also favored. Stories that show up are also influenced by which friends you interact with the most.

Meanwhile, a Stanford University study found that user posts that aren’t liked or commented on tend to be viewed by fewer people, so you may find that your college buddy’s engagement announcement floats to the top of your feed, while your best friend’s gripe about the cost of daycare is nowhere to be seen.

To get around this, head to your feed, click on “News Feed” in the top left, and toggle the option to show Most Recent instead of Top Stories. To ensure particular friends’ posts pop up on your feed, add them to your Close Friends list. On your news feed, scroll down the left-hand menu, hover over Friends and click More > Close friends, then add their names in the right-side text bar. Hit Manage List in the top right to select the particular types of updates you get — for example, photos and status updates, but not games or comments.

If someone’s status updates are getting on your nerves but you’re not quite ready to unfriend them, you can unsubscribe from their updates entirely by clicking in the top right of the offending status in your news feed, then selecting “Hide All.”

This article was written by Natasha Stokes and originally appeared on Techlicious.

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TIME World Cup

U.S. Soccer Captain Clint Dempsey Posts Adorable Father’s Day Instagram

U.S. soccer wins Instragram

Clint Dempsey may be the captain of the United States’ men’s national soccer team but he’s also apparently the team’s captain of adorable-ness. Dempsey posted this amazing photo to Instagram just a day before the American striker leads the U.S. squad in its opening World Cup contest against team Ghana (Monday at 6 p.m. EST folks — get your caxirolas ready!). A pair of tickets to the next World Cup says that the young lad summiting Dempsey’s shoulders and the two in his lap are quite possibly the happiest kids in the world tonight. The aww-inducing pic has already racked up thousands of likes on Instagram.

TIME human behavior

Peer Pressure Lasts Only Three Days, Study Says

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Image Source—Getty Images/Image Source

Wait a few days before you decide whether to follow the pack

Feeling pressure to go on a date with someone all your friends told you was so cute? Just wait three days and your true feelings might be revealed. It turns out the influence of others may not have as big an impact on your decisions as psychological researchers previously thought, according to a new study published in Psychological Science. In fact, their opinion may only be impactful for a short period.

Researchers at Chinese universities asked men to rate the attractiveness of 280 female faces. After they rated each face, the study participants were shown the average ratings the rest of the experimental group gave the face. They were then asked to rate the same faces after one day, three days, one week or three months. The research team found that individuals’ initial judgments could be altered by others’ opinions in the first three days. After that, they stuck with their initial assessment.

Our findings suggest that because the social-conformity effect lasts several days, it reflects a short-term change in privately held views rather than a transient public compliance,” the authors of the study said in a statement.

Obviously, peer pressure can be constant and doesn’t work in the limited, fleeting way tested in this experimental setting. Still, it’s good to know we are capable of making our own decisions independent of our friends — after a few days go by.

TIME social

7 Ways to Shop Online with Friends

Shopping with friends used to be an event. You’d meet a girlfriend or two for lunch, then amble through the mall or down the street together perusing items and sharing opinions about what might look good on the other person or work well in their house. Thanks to Pinterest and a slew of other social shopping sites, you can come close to replicating this online. Here are the websites and apps we like that help you shop with friends virtually.

Pinterest

Pinterest

Ever since it came onto the scene four years ago, Pinterest has defined the category of visual discovery by letting users create and collect “pins,” or bookmarks, to online content. With a predominantly female user base, the platform features mostly images of food, fashion and home and garden that link to other websites such as recipe blogs or shopping sites. Pinterest is a social network as well, letting you follow the Pinterest activity of friends from Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Gmail and Yahoo (and they yours), as well as strangers who pin material you find interesting. Most recently, Pinterest launched a feature called Guided Search that helps you explore pinned content with similar content; for example, it might suggest “Bachelorette Party” or “Summer” if you search for “little black dress.” If you click on “little black dress,” you can then choose from “all pins” to mine the entire platform or “Just my Pins” if you want to find one you already pinned. Want to make it super simple to pin cool things you find while surfing the web? Install a Pin It bookmarklet to your browser. One click sends that content over to Pinterest, which also can be accessed via free iOS and Android apps.

Wanelo

Wanelo

Named with a combination of the words want, need and love, Wanelo is more of a pure shopping site than Pinterest. You populate your feed with clothing, accessories and home goods images by following other users as well as stores such as Victoria’s Secret, Crate and Barrel and Banana Republic (plus scads of others you probably haven’t heard of). Save items you find to collections you name such as “Things I Like” or “Dresses”; if you click to buy them, you’ll leave Wanelo and go to the store where they’re offered. If you find something you think a friend would like or want someone else’s opinion on an item, you can send it to your friends on Facebook and Twitter if you’ve connected those accounts to Wanelo. Like Pinterest, Wanelo offers a bookmarklet you can add to your browser to make it easy to save things to Wanelo, and it’s also accessible via free iOS and Android apps.

The Hunt

The Hunt

Have you ever found the loveliest outfit that you would never be able to afford or coveted something worn by Angelina Jolie? Or maybe you own an item but can’t figure out what goes well with it. The Hunt community will help you find items that are similar or exactly the same as photos you upload from any website or bring in from Tumblr, Instagram or Pinterest. Follow other people’s hunts — items you also wouldn’t mind having — and stay in the loop when people post URLs to websites where you can find them. Even better, become a fashion detective yourself and post a link to a store website that sells something being hunted. The Hunt is available as a free iOS app.

Glimpse by The Find

Glimpse

Glimpse mines your Facebook network for product likes and pulls in photos, prices and links where you can purchase them. Save your favorites in catalogs and customize your feed by clicking to subtract product categories and brands you’re not interested in. Glimpse is also accessible via free iOS and Android apps.

The Beauty Board by Sephora

Sephora

If makeup is your thing, you’ll love Sephora’s Beauty Board. The stream of selfies is a fantastic resource for ideas on how to do your makeup, and it gives you quick access via Sephora.com to the products people used to come up with these looks. Filter looks according to categories such as Eyes, Lips or Nails and share looks to Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter and Google+ in one click.

Luvocracy

Luvocracy

On Luvocracy, add your favorite items and links to where people can buy them to collections based on any kind of category you want, such as “Spring,” “Organizing Tools” or “Home.” The idea is to earn rewards via money from purchases or royalty checks. When someone you invite to Luvocracy joins the site, you earn 2 percent of their purchases on the platform for one year. You also make 2 percent when someone buys something that you’ve recommended and get royalties when someone re-posts one of your recommendations, although royalties diminish with the distance between your original post and successive re-posts. If you’re popular online — say, you run a well-read fashion blog or have lots of followers on Pinterest — you could qualify for the Tastemaker program and earn up to 10 percent when people buy the things you recommend. A Luvocracy Chrome extension lets you add things to the platform as you find them while you’re surfing the web.

nousDECOR

nousDecor

This unique interior design search engine makes it easy to create and affordably source the home looks you want. Browse photos of room designs and products on collections called moodboards created by nousDecor editors and users. Moodboards include an inspiration image along with a selection of products that fit the room theme. Hover your pointer to see product details, prices and where to find them (including well-known retailers such as Macy’s). Create your own look by uploading an inspiration image (perhaps from Pinterest or Tumblr) and then populating it with things that fit your style. Search by name, color, price or dimensions — or just browse through a list of suggestions. When you’re done, name, categorize and save your moodboard and then ask for design advice from the nousDECOR community.

This article was written by Christina DesMarais and originally appeared on Techlicious.

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TIME Shopping

The #AmazonCart Hashtag Lets You Shop Amazon Right from Twitter

Just in case you needed an excuse to a) never leave Twitter and b) buy more stuff from Amazon

Sensing that you might be interested in buying something that someone you know just bought, Twitter and Amazon have intermingled themselves to introduce the #AmazonCart hashtag.

If you see a tweet containing a product link to something on Amazon, all you’ll need to do is reply to that tweet with “#AmazonCart” and the same item will be added to your Amazon shopping cart.

The idea is that you can just keep adding products all day, swing by the bank for a second mortgage on your way home and then hit the checkout button later that night once you’ve moved some money around.

You’ll need to first connect your Amazon and Twitter accounts, and there are some failsafes – a tweet back from @MyAmazon and an email confirming you’ve added something to your cart – but this is another step toward a frictionless shopping experience.

[CNET]

TIME social

Twitter Reportedly Tests a Mute Button for Politely Ignoring People

An experimental feature would keep excessive tweets from clogging your feed.

Twitter is reportedly experimenting with a “mute” button, which would let you follow someone without seeing their posts in your feed.

The mute button is apparently just a test for now, appearing for at least a couple of people within Twitter’s iPhone app. Twitter acknowledged last fall that it’s been running more experiments, but there’s no word on whether mute will launch for everyone.

Mute would be helpful for whenever someone you follow is getting too noisy. While you can always just unfollow that person, doing so would prevent you from exchanging direct messages, and may also just come off as rude, especially if it’s a friend or family member. Some third-party apps, such as TweetDeck and Tweetbot, have their own mute buttons, but because those apps aren’t available on every platform, there’s no good way to mute someone across all your devices.

Last December, Twitter flirted with mute functionality by changing the way blocking worked, so that blocked users would still be able to view, reply and retweet whatever you wrote. The backlash was so strong that Twitter quickly reversed its policy. This only solidified the need for a separate mute button, so hopefully the feature will graduate from the lab soon.

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