TIME Research

How Having Oily Skin Might Help Prevent Wrinkles

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And why wrinkles tend to be more noticeable around your eyes than on your forehead

Have you ever heard the old wives’ tale that people with oilier skin get fewer wrinkles? There may be some small grain of truth in that after all, according to a new study published in the journal Clinical Anatomy.

For the study, Japanese researchers analyzed the skin on the foreheads and around the eyes in cadavers aged 20 to 90 years old, looking at the wrinkles, the number of sebaceous glands (which are what secrete the skin’s oil), as well as the skin’s elasticity and density. In the end they found that the depth and length of wrinkles correlated to the amount of sebaceous glands in these areas, with areas with more glands tending to have wrinkles that weren’t as deep or long.

This may explain why wrinkles tend to be more noticeable around your eyes (hello, crow’s feet) than on your forehead, since there are more oil-secreting glands in the forehead than around your eyes.

While the authors say it’s possible that oilier skin (thanks to having more glands) prevents dry and deeper wrinkles from forming, the presence of the oil isn’t the only thing that seems to help keep skin smooth. It could also be that the skin on the areas with more glands tended to be thicker and have more elasticity. As the researchers put it: “Such properties will suppress the deformation of the skin.”

Another interesting finding: the density of oil glands was lower in women, than it was for the men, though they didn’t see a big difference in wrinkle depth between the sexes.

Ultimately, what matters more for your skin is the total picture: protecting yourself from the sun’s rays, exercise, eating a healthy diet with lots of foods that are good for your skin, and getting enough sleep.

But hey, if this makes you feel a little bit better about your oily skin, we won’t blame you.

This article originally appeared on Health.com

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TIME advice

6 Mosquito Repellent Plants to Keep Pests Away

From basil to lavender

Summer means it’s time to fire up the grill and invite friends over for a barbecue, but it seems like unexpected guests always crash the party. No, not your in-laws — we’re talking about pesky bugs.

There are ways to keep mosquitoes and other insects away besides drowning yourself in bug spray. For a more green approach, try installing some of these insect-repelling plants around your yard.

  • 1. Marigolds

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    Not only do they make your landscape more attractive, but marigolds also have a distinct smell that repels mosquitoes. Plant from seed or get a starter plant from a nursery or floral department. Place potted marigolds near mosquito entry-points, such as doors and windows, or on a deck or balcony where you spend a lot of time outdoors. They also deter insects that prey on tomato plants — an added bonus for gardeners.

  • 2. Citronella

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    Citronella is one of the most common ingredients in insect repellents, due to its strong smell, which masks mosquito attractants. The perennial clumping grass grows 5 to 6 feet, and can be planted in the ground or kept in large pots. Citronella plants thrive best in full sun and areas with good drainage.

  • 3. Catnip

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    Warning: Your catnip might bring all the cats to the yard. The perennial herb, related to mint, is easy to grow. While it repels mosquitoes in close proximity, some people apply crushed leaves for more protection.

  • 4. Lavender

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    In addition to smelling lovely, aiding in relaxation and promoting restful sleep, lavender dissuades mosquitoes and gnats from invading your outdoor dinner party when planted in the garden or in pots placed by windows, doors and entertainment areas. The dried flowers can also be placed in wardrobes to repel moths.

  • 5. Basil

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    Enjoy delicious pesto dishes, and keep mosquitoes at bay, with this insect-repelling herb. Basil is one of the few herbs in which you don’t have to crush the leaves to reap its benefits. Lemon basil and cinnamon basil are the best varieties to prevent unwanted pests.

  • 6. Lemon Balm

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    Also known as horsemint, lemon balm’s aroma wards off mosquitoes, but attracts pollinators like bees and butterflies. It’s fast growing, drought resistant and reseeds itself, so consider planting in a pot rather than in your yard to avoid a lemon balm takeover.

    This article originally appeared on Angie’s List

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TIME Healthcare

Why Your Rosy Cheeks Could Be Signaling a Health Problem

A red face might be more than just a flush

During my 20s, I saved a lot of money on makeup: I never needed blush, because I had a perma-rosy flush. But a few weeks after I turned 30, I noticed a squiggle on my left cheek that looked like a red pen mark yet turned out, upon closer inspection, to be a capillary. Soon, more joined it. I visited a dermatologist. That flushing wasn’t a gift from nature; it was rosacea.

An estimated 16 million Americans have this condition, though they may not know it. “Rosacea is one of the most undiagnosed medical disorders—people mistake it for acne, eczema or sensitive skin,” notes Whitney Bowe, MD, clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. It typically starts in your 30s, is more common among women and is peskiest now; in a poll of 852 rosacea patients by the national Rosacea society, 58 percent said their symptoms are at their worst during the summer. Here’s the scoop on those flare-ups.

What rosacea looks like:
Redness that won’t go away
It usually appears on your cheeks, nose, chin and forehead. Sometimes rosy patches also show up on the neck, chest, scalp and ears.

Visible blood vessels
They tend to crop up on the cheeks, chin and nose.

Dry skin
“One of the main issues with rosacea is a breakdown in skin barrier function,” Dr. Bowe says. “Skin may no longer be able to trap moisture, leading to dryness and itchiness.”

Bumps
Along with redness, pus-filled pimples and little red bumps are an issue for folks with papulopustular rosacea—the second most common kind. “With acne, breakouts occur on the jaw and hairline, but rosacea occurs in the middle third of the face,” says Anne Chapas, MD, a dermatological surgeon in New York City. Plus, there are usually no accompanying blackheads or whiteheads.

Why you’re caught red-faced
Light-skinned ladies, like me, of Eastern or Northern European descent are most at risk of rosacea. There’s also a genetic link, concludes a new study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

Sufferers tend to have blood vessels that dilate easily, increasing the rush of blood to the skin’s surface—particularly when spicy foods, red wine, exercise, stress, warm temperatures and sun are involved. The one-two whammy: You’re more prone to rosacea if you blush easily—and having the condition can make you even redder.

Not only can sun exposure trigger redness, but sunburns from your teens and early 20s (before you knew better, of course) can haunt you, making capillaries rear their heads. “Over time, sun damage breaks down healthy tissue that acts as a barrier between your blood vessels and the surface of the skin, and they become more visible,” Dr. Bowe says.

Scientists have pinpointed one icky culprit for papulopustular rosacea: Demodex, a microscopic mite that lives on all our faces but can be found in 10 times greater number on those with rosacea. “When they die, they release bacteria, leading to skin inflammation and pustules,” says Kevin Kavanagh, PhD, a microbiologist at Maynooth university in Ireland, who researches Demodex. The little buggers proliferate on weathered skin, according to a review of studies published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology—thanks again, sun!

Your best treatment plan:
While none of these solutions can erase the mental image of critters crawling over your face, they are proven to fight rosacea.

Rx gels and creams
In 2013, Mirvaso became the first prescription medication approved by the FDA to ease redness from rosacea. Brand new: Soolantra (ivermectin), used to reduce bumps, has both anti-inflammatory and antiparasitic properties, so it’s a Demodex foe. Finacea (azaelic acid) is another common prescription for papulopustular rosacea. A dermatologist might recommend a combination of meds to address different symptoms; insurance typically pays. People with severe rosacea could additionally need an antibacterial and antimicrobial antibiotic, such as doxycycline.

Lasers
Derms zap visible blood vessels with intense pulsed light and KTP lasers, heating and disintegrating them, Dr. Chapas explains. No worries; the procedure feels like the snap of a rubber band, and swelling and redness should resolve in a day. Patients typically need one to three sessions, with more as other squiggly lines appear. Most painful of all: sessions can run $250-plus a pop, and insurance won’t cover them.

Probiotics
Growing evidence suggests that creams with probiotics can keep out “bad” bacteria and help contain inflammation. Pill versions may come in handy, too. A study in the journal Beneficial Microbes found that oral probiotic supplements can strengthen the skin barrier. And ingesting more kefir, miso soup, kombucha tea, sauerkraut and yogurt with active cultures—all high in probiotics—could help.

Control triggers
Sure, you can avoid red wine, exercise, sun and stress—if you’re a hermit or a monk. As Dr. Bowe says, “You can’t stop living!” I spritz my face with water during workouts and at the beach to tamp down flushing. Some swear by rubbing on ice cubes made of green tea (which has anti-inflammatory properties) to reduce redness. “Work with a doctor to come up with a regimen that keeps symptoms under control,” Dr. Bowe urges. “And if you have a big event, lay off triggers the day before.”

This article originally appeared on Health.com

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TIME Diet/Nutrition

10 Foods That Make You Look Younger

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These foods pack the building blocks of healthy hair and skin

You can head off a lot of your most common beauty concerns simply by downing the right foods. That’s right—eating well not only does wonders for your waistline and bolsters your immune system but can also provide some very real get-gorg benefits, such as smoothing wrinkles, giving hair a glossy shine and strengthening flimsy nails. “Your diet directly affects your day-to-day appearance and plays a significant role in how well you age,” says Joshua Zeichner, MD. The smart approach, Dr. Zeichner says, is to create a plan that includes what he calls “the building blocks of healthy skin and hair”—nutrients, minerals and fatty acids—as well as antioxidants to protect your body from damaging environmental stresses. Get ready to nab some beauty-boosting perks by tossing these essential face-saving edibles into your grocery cart.

Coffee

Grabbing some java every morning doesn’t just jump-start your day—that cup of joe has bioactive compounds that may help protect your skin from melanoma (the fifth most common cancer in the U.S.), according to a recent report in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Researchers found that the more coffee people downed, the less likely they were to get the disease: Those drinking four cups daily had a 20 percent lower risk of developing malignant melanoma over a 10-year period than non-coffee drinkers.

Watermelon

The summertime fave is loaded with lycopene. “This antioxidant compound gives watermelon and tomatoes their red color—and helps skin stave off UV damage,” says nutrition pro Keri Glassman, RD, founder of NutritiousLife.com. Researchers believe that the melon contains as much as 40 percent more of the phytochemical than raw tomatoes; that’s the equivalent of an SPF 3, so use it to bolster (not replace) your daily dose of sunscreen.

Pomegranates

The seeds of this wonder fruit are bursting with antioxidants, like vitamin C, that prevent fine lines, wrinkles and dryness by neutralizing the free radicals that weather skin. A study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that higher vitamin C intake lessened the likelihood of dryness and wrinkles in middle-aged women. Also in the fruit’s arsenal: anthocyanins (which help increase collagen production, giving skin a firmer look) and ellagic acid (a natural chemical that reduces inflammation caused by UV damage).

Blueberries

Boost radiance by popping some of these plump little beauties. Blueberries supply vitamins C and E (two antioxidants that work in tandem to brighten skin, even out tone and fight off free-radical damage), as well as arubtin, “a natural derivative of the skin lightener hydroquinone,” Dr. Zeichner says.

Lobster

High in zinc, shellfish has anti-inflammatory properties that can help treat a range of skin annoyances, acne included. “Zinc accelerates the renewal of skin cells,” says Whitney Bowe, MD, clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “That’s why you find the nutrient in many acne medications.” In fact, research shows that people with acne have lower levels of zinc than people with clear skin.

Kale

On the long list of this leafy green‘s nutrients are vitamin K (it promotes healthy blood clotting, so the blood vessels around the eyes don’t leak and cause Walking Dead-like shadows) and loads of iron. “Insufficient levels of iron in your diet can cause your skin to look pale, making it easier to spot blood vessels under the skin,” explains Howard Murad, MD, associate clinical professor of medicine at UCLA. To max out the benefits, eat the veggie cooked, not raw.

Eggs

Your fingernails (toenails, too) are made of protein, so a deficiency can turn those talons soft. Keep yours thick and mani-pedi-ready by cracking smart: “Eggs are a good source of biotin, a B complex vitamin that metabolizes amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein,” says Frank Lipman, MD, director of Eleven-Eleven Wellness Center in New York City.

Walnuts

Omega-3 fatty acids (found in the natural oils that keep your hair hydrated) and vitamin E (which helps repair damaged follicles) are two secrets behind strong, lustrous strands—and these nuts are full of both, Dr. Lipman says. All you need is 1/4 cup a day. What’s more, walnuts are packed with copper, which will help keep your natural color rich: Studies show that being deficient in the mineral may be a factor in going prematurely gray.

Avocado

Like you need another reason to love them: These rich fruits are high in oleic acid, an omega-9 fatty acid that helps skin retain moisture in the outer layer to keep it soft, plump and supple, Dr. Bowe says.

Cantaloupe

The sweet melon contains beta carotene, or vitamin A, which is believed to regulate the growth of skin cells on your scalp and sebum in the skin’s outer layer, Dr. Zeichner says. This keeps pores from getting clogged and causing flakes.

Pop a pill to get pretty

Hearing more about beauty supplements? Nutraceuticals, as they’re called, are big news right now—and with good reason. “There is clinical proof that some of these supplements, which are basically a preformulated set of ingredients, really work,” notes Joshua Zeichner, MD. Here are four worth downing.

Biomarine complex

A lot of interesting stuff is lurking beneath the sea, according to Dr. Zeichner, who points to a study in the Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology showing that a supplement containing marine protein powder, along with other nutrients and vitamins, helped regenerate skin cells in the scalp, resulting in increased hair growth after 90 days. Go fish! A good source: Viviscal Extra Strength Dietary Supplements, $39; walmart.com.

Probiotics

To get healthy skin, you need a healthy gut. “Oral probiotics, filled with ‘good’ bacteria, help maintain a balance between good and bad bacteria in your system to help your body dial down the inflammation that can trigger a host of skin problems, including acne, rosacea and dandruff,” says Whitney Bowe, MD. A good source: Align Probiotic Supplements, $29; drugstore.com.

Green tea extract

By now you know there’s a great deal this bionic brew can offer—yep, younger-looking skin, too. Double down on the benefits by adding a supplement to your daily sips: “The high concentration of polyphenols, powerful antioxidants found in green tea, help make skin more resistant to UV damage that leads to premature aging,” says Frank Lipman, MD. A good source: Vitamin World Super Strength Green Tea Extract, $26; vitaminworld.com.

This article originally appeared on Health.com

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TIME public health

5 Essential Tricks for Treating a Sunburn

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Remember to constantly moisturize your skin

Of course you understand the importance of sunscreen, but sometimes, no matter how diligent you were with reapplying, you still end up getting too much sun. While the damage of a sunburn can’t be undone (sadly), there are things you can do to speed up the healing process and soothe your red, inflamed skin. We asked Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of cosmetic and clinical research in the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, about the best way to feel better fast.

Work from the inside out

So you’re on the way home from the beach, and one look in the rearview mirror tells you that you’re in trouble. As soon as you realize your skin is a little too red, take an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory pill like ibuprofen or aspirin, Dr. Zeichner recommends. This can help stop inflammation and redness from getting any worse and ease pain.

Cool down

Once you get to a shower, rinse off with cool water to soothe skin and remove any chlorine, salt water or sand that may be lingering and causing more irritation. Have a bath? Even better! Add a cup of whole oats to the cool bath water for extra calming power.

Moisturize

The sun zaps moisture from the skin, so be sure to replenish it regularly over the next few days with a rich moisturizer. Zeichner recommends looking for ones that contain aloe, glycerin or hyaluronic acid like Sun Bum Cool Down Aloe Spray ($12, nordstrom.com). If it’s a small area like your nose, neck or ears, try a 1% hydrocortisone ointment like Cortizone 10 Hydrocortisone Anti-Itch Cream Plus 10 Moisturizers ($9, walgreens.com) to reduce inflammation. Hot tip: Keep your moisturizers in the fridge for an extra refreshing treat.

Use a DIY compress

Try using a cool compress soaked in skim milk, egg whites or green tea. The proteins in milk and egg whites coat and calm the burn while green tea reduces inflammation.

Drink up

Not only does the sun take away the moisture from your skin, it also dehydrates the rest of your body as well, which is why you may also feel extra tired after a long day in the sun. Counteract the sun’s damage by drinking lots of water and eating water filled fruit like watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, or grapes.

This article originally appeared on Health.com

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TIME

3 Skin Products You Need to Stop Using

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You may think that as long as an item is on store shelves, it’s got a proven health and safety record. But the truth is, the long-term impact of personal-care creations aren’t always fully understood until years after they go to market.

That’s the case with several high-profile health and beauty products on the market today: Doctors and scientists are discovering that despite their popularity and “healthy” image, they may not be so good for us, or for the planet. So we asked Lisa Donofrio, M.D., associate clinical professor of dermatology at Yale University, for her take on the recent headlines. Here’s her advice on which ingredients to avoid, plus her recommended alternatives.

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Antibacterial soaps and body washes
Liquid hand and body soaps that boast “antibacterial” claims often contain an ingredient called triclosan, which has been linked to antibiotic resistance and hormone disruption. (Triclosan is also present in some toothpastes and cosmetics.) “It gets into the water supply and kills off beneficial bacteria,” says Dr. Donofrio. Plus, she adds, research hasn’t shown a true health benefit to antibacterial products. “We need to be a little dirty; it’s good to give our immune systems something to do so they don’t turn on us.”

The FDA has warned manufacturers that in the coming years, they’ll need to prove that products containing triclosan are more effective in preventing illness and reducing the spread of infection than regular soap and water, or they’ll have to reformulate their products. And Minnesota recently issued a ban on triclosan, which will go into effect in 2017.

Antibacterial bar soaps can contain a similar chemical, called triclocarban, that should be avoided as well. Instead, says Dr. Donofrio, choose bars, liquid soaps, and body washes with natural antimicrobials (she likes formulas that contain benzoyl peroxide or sulphur, which are gentler on the environment and don’t foster drug resistance), or use an alcohol-based sanitizer to clean your hands when you’re not near soap and water.

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Face and body scrubs with microbeads
These tiny plastic beads are added to face and body washes as an exfoliant, and they help scrub away dead skin. The problem is, recent studies have shown that they also slip through water filtration systems and are making their way into our streams and oceans, potentially hurting fish and wildlife. The synthetic ingredient was recently banned by Illinois, and several other states are following suit.

In light of this news, a “natural” exofoliant may seem like the way to go—but Dr. Donofrio cautions against face and body washes that contain ground up pieces of nuts, seeds, and pits, which can have jagged edges and scratch or irritate skin. Her best alternative? “A coarse washcloth is a great exfoliator, as are scrubs that contain fine sea salt or sugar.”

Health.com: 13 Everyday Habits That Age You

Anything with parabens
These preservatives are found in everything from shampoos to soaps to lotions, and are used to prevent bacteria growth and extend shelf life. But they are also absorbed into our bodies, and research suggests that they may be tied to hormone disruption and certain cancers. “They bind to estrogen receptors and pose a potential health risk since they are stored in body fat,” says Dr. Donofrio. “Since we are uncertain if they pose a real or theoretical health problem, why tempt fate?”

Parabens are listed on ingredient labels—as methylparaben, propylparaben, or other words ending in -paraben—so it’s easy to choose products that don’t contain them, says Dr. Donofrio, or to limit your exposure by keeping their use to a small amount of skin area. Preservative-free products, or those with natural preservatives (such as grapefruit-seed extract, rosemary extract, or citric acid), likely won’t last as long, but if you use them regularly you should still finish them before their expiration date.

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

TIME Research

This Scent Can Help Heal Wounds, Study Says

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By activating olfactory receptors in your skin

Get a whiff of this: Skin cells have olfactory receptors, and when those receptors are exposed to sandalwood, a popular ingredient in perfumes and incense sticks, the resulting changes in cell activity could facilitate wound healing, says study author Dr. Hans Hatt of Ruhr-Universität Bochum in Germany. The research was published Wednesday in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

While people typically think of olfactory receptors as having to do with smell, this isn’t always the case. Humans have about 350 olfactory receptors in the nose, but previous studies have shown they also exist in sperm, in the prostate, in kidneys and in our intestine. This is the first time that olfactory receptors have been found in keratinocytes—cells that form the outermost layer of the skin. And Hatt’s team discovered that when those receptors in the skin—called OR2AT4—were in proximity to synthetic sandalwood, they became activated, prompting cell proliferation and cell migration.

Hatt said it was difficult to convince the scientific community of his team’s findings. “I feel a mission to convince my colleagues, and especially clinicians, that this huge family of olfactory receptors plays an important role in cell physiology,” says Hatt.

Hatt is curious about the other discoveries this research could lead to, including applications for cancer, because some cancer T-cells have olfactory receptors, as well as in cosmetic or wound-healing applications.

“It will be a lot of work to study the function of these receptors, but it may open an enormous group of exciting targets,” Hatt said.

TIME skin care

3 Ways to Exfoliate Without Using Microbeads

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Illinois is banning microbeads in facewash. Here's what to use instead

News about Illinois’ ban on facewashes that contain microbeads raise serious environmental concerns that are being heeded by a number of states. But for the vain among us, it begs the question: What to use instead of microbeads if you want that squeaky-clean feeling?

First, it bears a reminder that aggressively scrubbing your face is not a good idea, both because it can cause tiny tears in the surface of your skin—making it prone to infection and inflammation—and also because you don’t want to disrupt the skin’s acid mantle, which is there to keep in moisture and keep out pathogens.

There are thousands of products that claim to safely remove dead skin cells, but sometimes, simple is best. Here are three easy ways to clean your face that won’t break the bank, expose you to harsh ingredients or ruin your face.

Make Your Own, With Honey

Honey has long been a mainstay in DIY natural beauty, and for good reason. Honey is naturally antimicrobial, which makes it an effective cleanser on its own. You can rub a tablespoon between your hands and will find it gets nice and slippery—the consistency of a fancy face wash. It’s also humectant, which means it attracts and retains moisture and can help keep your skin dewy—something a lot of harsh exfoliating scrubs cannot claim to do—and it contains gluconic acid, a mild acid that is considered benign by public health experts.

A recent review in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology concluded that: “Honey is particularly suitable as a dressing for wounds and burns … dandruff … In cosmetic formulations, it exerts emollient, humectant, soothing, and hair conditioning effects, regulates pH and prevents pathogen infections.”

Some natural beauty mavens like to mix their honey with baking soda—which is something you want to be careful with because it’s quite alkaline. Your skin’s pH is widely thought to be around 5.5 (though a 2006 study placed it closer to 5), and it has what’s called an acid mantle on it. That’s an important barrier to keep intact, both to protect against infections and to keep in moisture. Try honey on its own, and if you want that scrubby feeling, mix in just a pinch of baking soda.

Use a Konjac Sponge

You could spend upwards of $150 on an electronic face scrubber, or you could drop $11 and get yourself a reusable sponge made, as the name suggests, of fibers from the root of a konjac plant. It comes rock hard, but put it under warm water and it softens into a springy dome that you can use with or without a cleanser to slough off dead skin cells. It’s gentle enough that you can use it daily. Some brands make konjac sponges infused with things like charcoal, which is a natural detoxifier for the skin. You could go that route if you want to, but I prefer the basic one. One konjac sponge will last you six weeks of twice-daily use.

Use A Gentle Peel With Lactic Acid

There are two main ways to get rid of the dead skin cells that dull the look of the surface of your skin. There are manual exfoliants—like scrubs and konjac sponges and face cloths—and there are chemical ones. The latter use acids to dissolve the material that keeps skin cells bound together, making dead cells easier to remove. (There is some evidence that some acids also support cell turnover. Cell turnover slows as we age, which is why these acids are also touted as antiagers.)

These kinds of exfoliants can be natural or synthetic, and can cause irritation in some people. There are tons of different acids in products on the market—well known ones include alpha hydroxy acid, lactic acid and glycolic acid. Lactic acid appears to improve water barrier properties, which helps the skin retain moisture, while also being an exfoliant. You should not use products containing acids in the morning because they can increase sensitivity to the sun. And always wear SPF on your face, whether you’re using a scrub or not.

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