TIME cities

Seattle Bus Fares Are Now Based on Your Income

Mass transit officials have long offered discounts to certain commuters—seniors, veterans and government employees, to name a few. On Sunday, Seattle added people from low-income households to the list.

Under a new program, commuters with household incomes less than two times the federal poverty line pay only $1.50 for most trips on the region’s buses, light rail trains and street cars. The county estimates that the program could save workers who commute during peak hours more than $900 per year.

Seattle, like cities across the country, has seen a growing income gap between its highly-educated residents with high incomes and poorer residents. The commuter program is one of many efforts to assist those on the lower end of that spectrum. The city’s highly-publicized $15 minimum wage, another such effort, takes effect in April.

 

TIME NFL

See How Patriots Players and Fans Celebrated Super Bowl Win

The New England team celebrated their fourth Super Bowl victory after defeating the Seattle Seahawks 28-24 in Glendale, Ariz.

TIME Football

Twitter Reacts to Super Bowl XLIX

From your house to the White House

First things first. There was the food.

As the game kicked off, Seattle’s most famous rapper made it clear where he stood.

But even Mackelmore didn’t get the VIP treatment like Steven Tyler.

After the two teams traded punches and ended the first half tied 14-14, Donnie Walberg came through with epic analysis.

And of course, the Katy Perry’s Halftime performance created just as much of a stir as the game itself. Neil Patrick Harris approved…sort of.

So did Anderson Cooper.

R&B singer Anthony Hamilton thought there was another star of the show.

While Snoop Dogg claimed he was actually a guest performer.

But back to the game: Seattle wide receiver Chris Matthews was the surprise star of the Super Bowl.

A journalist for the Charlotte Observer voiced what we were all thinking.

The game turned in Seattle’s favor with Tom Brady’s second interception.

Rapper Gucci Mane knew the reason Seattle was pulling away in the 3rd quarter.

And naturally the ‘deflategate’ jokes were aplenty.

But the Patriots didn’t give up, and a 4th quarter touchdown by Tom Brady made the game interesting, in both English and Spanish.

That touchdown was also a huge milestone for Tom Brady—setting the all-time record for most career touchdown passes in the Super Bowl.

Five minutes left. New England is driving!

Along the way Brady set another record.

New England wide receiver Julian Edelman’s touchdown reception gave the Patriots a four point lead with two minutes left, which left Seattle with one final opportunity.

Jermaine Kearse’s unbelievable catch. Seattle is driving for the win!

But a goal line interception breaks Seahawk hearts.

And the decision to throw the ball instead of running it will be questioned for years.

The New England Patriots are your Super Bowl XLIX Champions!

Tom Brady was the MVP of Super Bowl XLIX.

And the White House issued their congratulations.

See you next year!

MONEY Sports

Not Going to the Super Bowl? That’ll Cost You $75

The National Retail Federation estimates the average person not going to the game will spend an average of more than $75 on clothes, food and even a new TV.

MONEY Sports

The Super-Size Numbers Surrounding the Super Bowl

How many wings will we eat this Sunday? Who's watching just for the commercials? How much money have people bet illegally on this game?

Click through the gallery for answers to all of the above, as well as other fun facts about what people are eating, drinking, and spending come Sunday.

 

  • $30 Million

    Fans outside the University of Phoenix Stadium before the 2015 Pro Bowl at University of Phoenix Stadium on January 25, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.
    Christian Petersen—Getty Images

    The amount Arizona will spend to host Super Bowl XVIX. That figure is low, though, compared with the $50 million San Francisco, the host for next year’s Super Bowl, estimates it will need to spend. Last year’s hosts, New Jersey and New York, spent $70 million.

  • 36%

    Seattle Seahawks' Chris Matthews (13) and DeShawn Shead celebrate after overtime of the NFL football NFC Championship game against the Green Bay Packers Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015, in Seattle.
    Elaine Thompson—AP

    Proportion of Americans rooting for the Seattle Seahawks to win the game. The Patriots hold only a little less of the public’s support, with 31% rooting for them, but more people (33%) simply don’t care who wins, the Emerson College Polling Society found.

  • $119.95

    New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady's jersey on the rack at the Olympia Sports store. The Patriots will face the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX on Sunday, Feb. 1, 2015, in Glendale, Ariz.
    Charles Krupa—AP

    The price of a New England Patriots’ jersey bearing star quarterback Tom Brady‘s name. A similar jersey for Seahawks’ quarterback Russell Wilson sells for $20 less on NFLshop.com.

  • 158 Million

    150129_EM_SBNumbers_Avocados
    Getty Images—Getty Images

    The number of avocados Americans will consume around the championship game. After all, when you’re eating 11 million pounds of chips, you need a lot of guacamole. Don’t forget those beloved chicken wings: We’ll order up 1.23 billion of them on game day. And how will we wash all this food down? With 325 million gallons of beer, of course.

  • 2,400

    table of high calorie fast foods
    fStop Images—Alamy

    The number of calories in the snacks the average person will consume during the game. That makes this Sunday the second biggest day for gluttony after Thanksgiving, according to the Calorie Control Council.

  • $3.8 Billion

    Super Bowl proposition bets are displayed on a board at the Westgate Superbook race and sports book Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015, in Las Vegas.
    John Locher—AP

    The worth of all illegal bets the American Gaming Association expects to be made on this year’s game. That figure is 38 times greater than the $100 million that will be bet legally.

  • $4.5 Million

    Bud Light 90-second "Coin" Super Bowl Commercial
    Anheuser-Busch Bud Light 90-second "Coin" Super Bowl Commercial

    Cost of 30 seconds of air time during the Super Bowl, up $500,000 from 2014. Another big change: More of this year’s commercials will be paid for by companies you’ve never heard of. But no matter who is behind the ads, only 5% of people find them bothersome. The vast majority of viewers, 77%, find them entertaining.

  • 111.5 Million

    Denver Broncos fans watch their team play the Seahawks during the first half of the Super Bowl, inside Jackson's, a sports bar and grill in Denver.
    Brennan Linsley—AP Denver Broncos fans watch their team play the Seahawks during the first half of the Super Bowl, inside Jackson's, a sports bar and grill in Denver.

    The record-breaking number of people who tuned into last year’s game, when the Seahawks defeated the Denver Broncos. About seven out of 10 households watched, according to Nielsen.

  • 19%

    Victoria's Secret Super Bowl advertisement featuring Victoria’s Secret Angels playing football
    Michael Seto

    The percentage of people who say that the commercials are the most important part of the Super Bowl. Another 9% tune in for the halftime show, while 12% value getting together with friends. Only 36% of people said the actual game was most important. The remaining 24% planned to skip the game all together, the National Retail Federation reports.

  • 25.3 Million

    150129_EM_SBNumbers_TweetsSent
    Kacper Pempel—Reuters

    Tweets sent out during the course of last year’s game by the 5.6 million people who logged on to share their thoughts, according to Nielsen.

  • 26%

    150129_EM_SBNumbers_SBParty
    Lund-Diephuis—Getty Images

    Proportion of people who plan to attend a Super Bowl party this Sunday. Another 18% will host their own parties.

  • $78

    refrigerator of beer
    Simon Battensby—Getty Images

    Average amount people who will watch the Super Bowl plan to spend on food, beverages, and team merchandise, up from $68 last year, according to the NRF.

  • $69,241,725

    New England Patriots players warm up during practice Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015, in Tempe, Ariz. The Patriots play the Seattle Seahawks in NFL football Super Bowl XLIX Sunday, Feb. 1, in Glendale, Ariz.150129_EM_SBNumbers_Payroll
    Mark Humphrey—AP New England Patriots players warm up during practice Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015, in Tempe, Ariz.

    Payroll total for the Seattle Seahawks this year. The Patriots “only” spent $53,952,046 on salaries this year.

  • 26%

    goalposts with light flare from sun
    iStock

    Percentage of people who say that God plays a role in determining the outcome of a game, the Public Religion Research Institute found.

  • $92,000

    Superbowl Ring
    Elaine Thompson—AP

    The salary bonus each player on the winning team received last year, because, you know, a diamond-encrusted title ring and lifetime bragging rights aren’t enough. Players on the losing team got a $46,000 consolation bonus, Sports Illustrated reported.

  • $7,114

    A general view of the exterior of MetLife Stadium as a fan holds his Super Bowl XLVIII ticket prior to the Super Bowl XLVIII game between the Seattle Seahawks against the Denver Broncos in East Rutherford, New Jersey on Sunday, February 2, 2014. The Seahawks defeated the Broncos 43-8.
    Scott Boehm—AP

    Price of the cheapest Super Bowl ticket on secondary market ticket sale site TiqIQ as of Thursday afternoon.

  • Watch Now

TIME animals

Super Chill Dog Takes the Bus to Meet Her Owner at the Dog Park

Owners: who needs 'em?

Sometimes a dog just really wants to go to the dog park — and if that means taking the bus alone, so be it.

Eclipse, a self-sufficient 2-year-old black lab, has taken to riding public transit to the dog park alone when her owner misses the bus. “We get separated. She gets on the bus without me, and I catch up with her at the dog park,” said Eclipse’s owner Jeff Young, speaking to Seattle’s KOMO News. “It’s not hard to get on. She gets on in front of her house and she gets off at the dog park, three or four stops later.” No word on how she pays the fare with her cute little paws.

Since Lassie, Benji and Milo and Otis have helped pave the way for such precocious canine behavior, neither the dog, the owner, the bus driver, nor the other commuters seem to view the pup’s behavior as anything but adorable. “All the bus drivers know her. She sits here just like a person does,” commuter Tiona Rainwater, told KOMO. “She makes everybody happy. How could you not love this thing?” A spokesman for Seattle’s Metro Transit said the agency loves that a dog appreciates public transit.

While Eclipse is apparently capable of riding the streets of Seattle alone, helpful Seattleites frequently stop the dog on her travels. Young told KOMO that he gets a phone call once a week or so from good Samaritans anxious to help reunite a lost dog with its owner: “I have to tell them, ‘no. She’s fine.’ She knows what she’s doing.” Lassie probably never had to put up with that.
[H/T KOMO News]

TIME Korean War

America’s ‘First Korean War Bride’ Comes Home

Recalling a wartime story that, at its heart, is less about warfare than about the simple, indomitable power of love

Occasionally, when working with the seemingly boundless treasure that is the LIFE magazine archive, one comes across series of pictures, or long-forgotten articles, that clearly and undeniably capture something telling about their own time — while casting an unexpected light on our own imperfect era.

Such is the case with Wayne Miller’s marvelous photographs — and, perhaps especially, with the sympathetic text — from an article that ran in LIFE in November 1951. Titled “A War Bride Named ‘Blue’ Comes Home,” the two-page feature captured the scene when a woman LIFE dubbed “the first Korean war bride to arrive in America” and her husband, Sgt. Johnie Morgan, landed in Seattle, where Johnie’s mom and dad were anxiously waiting to see their son and meet their new daughter-in-law.

In LIFE’s words, “As the troop transport General M. M. Patrick pulled into Seattle’s harbor, the band on the dock loudly struck up Here Comes the Bride.”

Crowds cheered excitedly, whistles tooted. Seattle and the U.S. were welcoming the first Korean war bride to arrive in America, Mrs. Johnie Morgan, home with her sergeant husband.

To soldiers in Korea Mrs. Morgan had been known as “Blue” because when she refused to tell them her name (it was Lee Yong Soon) they said, “Okay, you’ve got a blue sweater so your name’s Blue.” She first met Johnie Morgan (he was christened “Johnie,” not “John”) in Seoul in 1949 where Blue worked for the U.S. Army as communications supervisor. By the time Korea was a word on the lips of every American, Johnie and Blue were in love. But love in Korea in 1950 was precious and brief. In late June, with the North Koreans coming in on Seoul, Johnie’s outfit withdrew 200 miles south to Pusan, and Blue was left behind. Three weeks later, her feet bare and bleeding, Blue reached Pusan and Johnie Morgan. She had walked across country to Johnie. “I knew then,” says Johnie, “how much I loved the kid,” and he asked her to marry him. It took five months for marriage permission to clear the Army. Then, after their wedding last Valentine’s Day, which is Blue’s birthday, Johnie passed up innumerable chances to return to the States until Blue’s papers could be cleared.

Before the transport docked in Seattle a little boat pulled alongside and an official greeter climbed aboard to give Blue a $100 savings bond — a homecoming gift from the city of Seattle. When the couple came ashore, Johnie’s mother rushed up to kiss Blue. “I’m so glad you’re here,” she said.

Seven decades later, as Americans spend Veterans Day honoring those who served — with parades and with other, quieter remembrances — it’s also fitting that we take a moment and recall a wartime story that, at its heart, is less about warfare than about the simple, indomitable power of love.

[See more of Wayne Miller’s work at Magnumphotos.com]

MONEY online shopping

Amazon Launches Competitor to Angie’s List and Yelp

Amazon is testing a home contractor recommendation service that puts the e-commerce giant in competition with sites like Yelp, Angie's List and Craigslist.

TIME Ferguson

See the Nation React to the Ferguson Decision

Citizens from L.A. to New York City staged protests following the announcement that a grand jury would not indict Officer Darren Wilson

Should Ferguson Protestors be Person of the Year? Vote below for #TIMEPOY

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