TIME Drones

Space Needle Guests Say Drone Crashed Into Window

Drone Enthusiasts
Similar drone design to that involved in the Space Needle incident. Ryan Lusher—Moment Editorial/Getty Images

There is no evidence to suggest Amazon’s drone delivery program has become sentient and gone rogue

Seattle’s iconic Space Needle looks to be completely undamaged after a small, white quadcopter drone operated by an Amazon employee may have crashed into an observation deck window Tuesday evening, police say.

Witnesses reported seeing an unmanned aerial vehicle buzzing around the Space Needle before “possibly” colliding with the structure, then zipping over to a nearby hotel room, they told police. The Seattle Police Department then contacted the resident of the room, who admitted to piloting the drone but said he merely approached, and did not collide with, the Space Needle.

The Amazon employee showed the police video of his drone flight, none of which suggested the drone actually hit the building. The video has been taken down from YouTube, but a few Vines posted by BuzzFeed have survived:

Commercial use of drones is generally prohibited in the United States while the Federal Aviation Administration works out how to integrate them into the national airspace. Flying drones recreationally, however, is allowed, though certain FAA rules and local laws apply. FAA guidance, for example, says recreational pilots should keep their aircraft below 400 feet above ground level and away from populated areas.

The Space Needle incident does not appear to have had anything to do with Amazon’s in-development drone delivery program.

TIME nation

First Recreational Marijuana Legally Sold in Seattle Donated to Museum

In this July 8, 2014, file photo, Deb Greene, 65, Cannabis City's first customer, displays her purchase of legal recreational marijuana at the store in Seattle. Elaine Thompson – AP

A marijuana milestone saved for posterity

The first marijuana sold for recreational purposes in Seattle is being donated to the city’s Museum of History and Industry, the Associated Press reports.

Deb Greene, a 65-year old grandmother, purchased it at the store Cannabis City on July 8, when the state’s first legal, recreational marijuana stores opened. The retiree brought “a chair, sleeping bag, food, water and a 930-page book” so she could camp out overnight and be the first in line, the AP reported at the time.

She purchased two bags of legal weed, one for personal use and another that was signed by Cannabis City owner, James Lathrop, so it could be “saved forever,” Greene told the Seattle Times. “You don’t use history.”

As Greene told the Puget Sound Business Journal, “I wanted to be a part of this, this is part of the history of our city.”

MORE: The Rules About Pot Just Changed in Washington D.C.

MORE: House Votes to Help Pot Businesses Use Banks

TIME U.S.

Man Tries to Kill a Spider and Ends Up Burning His House Down

Getty Images

And after all that, it's not even clear if the spider died

A man who apparently took the expression “kill it with fire” just a tad too literally caused his house to go up in flames after he attempted to kill a spider with a lighter and a can of spray paint.

He spotted the eight-legged intruder in the laundry room of his West Seattle home Tuesday evening and promptly went after it, local ABC affiliate KOMO reports. Firefighters arrived at the scene and eventually extinguished the blaze, but the fire had already caused significant damage. It will cost around $40,000 to repair the house and another $20,000 to repair or replace the items inside.

We’d like to take this opportunity to advise people to STOP DOING THIS. This keeps happening. Do not use fire to kill bugs. Don’t do it. Just say no.

You’re probably thinking, Well, at least the fire must have killed the spider! Ha-ha-ha! But no. Nobody can confirm if the spider survived or not. So basically, this spider could have gotten out alive and then watched the house burn from the safety of a nearby tree, probably petting a white cat and laughing maniacally.

TIME technology

Amazon Wants to Test-Fly Its New Delivery Drones

The online retail giant is moving toward its planned “Prime Air” drone delivery system

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Amazon has formally asked regulators permission to test its controversial and much-hyped delivery drones in outdoor areas near Seattle. The move, made in a letter posted to the Federal Aviation Administration’s website Thursday, escalates an ongoing debate about the safety of commercial drones and privacy concerns associated with the technology. In its July 9 letter from Amazon’s head of global public policy Paul Misener, the company said drone delivery will one day be “as normal as seeing mail trucks on the road today,” Reuters reports. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos unveiled the company’s still-in-development “Prime Air” drone delivery service on the 60 Minutes television program last year but said it was still about five years away from actual implementation. The company has been conducting delivery drone test flights indoors and in other countries, but now Bezos wants to conduct tests in the open air, according to the letter. “Of course, Amazon would prefer to keep the focus, jobs and investment of this important research and development initiative in the United States,” the company said in its letter. The U.S. government has designated six sites where tests can be conducted for commercial drone applications—in Alaska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Texas and Virginia—but such tests are currently prohibited in the Seattle area, where Amazon is based.

[Reuters]

TIME Drugs

Photos: This is What the First Day of Legal Weed Looked Like in Washington

Lots of cash, long lines and big smiles marked the launch of the second legal, recreational marijuana market in the U.S. Here are more scenes from opening day of Washington state's experiment with over-the-counter weed.

MONEY freebies

Where to Watch the USA-Germany World Cup Match for Free

140626_EM_WorldCupViewing_1
Max Herman/Corbis

Cities around the U.S. are getting in the World Cup spirit by hosting free public viewing parties of the big USA-Germany match on Thursday. Here a dozen places where you can catch the action.

If you’re a soccer fan, you may want to take an extra long lunch break (or breakfast for those in the West) and watch the match on a big screen—typically a really, really big screen in a city park or popular gathering place—with thousands of fellow fans who are doing the same thing. Here are a dozen U.S. cities where the public is being welcomed to watch the match as a group. Admission is free at all venues, and drinks and food are generally available on site.

Ann Arbor, Mich.: At the office of the Ann Arbor News, 111 N. Ashley St.

Boston, Mass.: City Hall Plaza

Buffalo, N.Y.: Canalside

Chicago, Ill.: Petrillo Music Shell in Grant Park

Dallas, Tex.: AT&T Plaza outside American Airlines Arena

Detroit, Mich.: Cadillac Square

Kansas City, Mo.: KC Live! Block

Los Angeles, Calif.: Hermosa Beach Pier

New York City: Bryant Park in Manhattan and under the Manhattan Bridge in Brooklyn

Orlando, Fla.: Wall Street Plaza (21+ only)

Salt Lake City, Utah: Energy Solutions Arena

Seattle, Wash.: Phinney Center

TIME Food & Drink

Starbucks Raises the Pride Flag Above Seattle Headquarters

Starbucks marked the 40th anniversary of Seattle Pride by raising an 800-square-foot flag at its corporate headquarters as a group of employees and CEO Howard Schultz watched from below in Seattle on June 20, 2014.
Starbucks marked the 40th anniversary of Seattle Pride by raising an 800-square-foot flag at its corporate headquarters as a group of employees and CEO Howard Schultz watched from below in Seattle on June 23, 2014. Nate Gowdy

Starbucks gets into Seattle's Pride Weekend

Starbucks made a very prominent declaration of its support for LGBT rights on Monday when company headquarters raised a rainbow flag in honor of the Seattle Pride Parade.

This isn’t the first time the national coffee chain has used its prominent brand to advocate for the gay community. In 2012, Starbucks was on a list of companies endorsing the legalization of same-sex marriage in Washington state, the Seattle Times reported.

“Given our public stance on diversity and inclusion of all people, particularly on this issue, it makes sense to raise the flag in celebration,” Executive Vice President Lucy Helm said in a statement.

The flag will remain raised throughout the weekend.

MONEY Amazon

WATCH: Amazon Smartphone Will Be Exclusive to AT&T

Amazon's first smartphone will launch exclusively on AT&T according to multiple reports.

TIME Transportation

Two Killed in Crash of WWII-Era Plane

The two-seater wrecked in Washington state

Two men were killed Wednesday when a small World War II-era airplane crashed in Washington state.

The two-seater aircraft crashed at about 3:30 p.m. in a wooded area after sputtering and flying low, a local station reported. The Federal Aviation Administration identified the plane was a North American AT-6C, King 5 News said.

The National Transportation Safety Board has reportedly been informed of the incident.

[King5 News]

TIME Minimum Wage

Seattle Approves $15 Minimum Wage

The sharp increase would be the first time a major U.S. city has committed to such a high base level of pay

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Seattle is set to have the highest minimum wage in the country, after it passed Monday legislation that would gradually increase the figure to $15 an hour, the Associated Press reports.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray said last month the plan to increase minimum wage demonstrates how Seattle “can lead the conversation and the nation to address this growing problem of income inequality.”

The city’s landmark legislation is part of a nationwide push to combat income inequality at a time when President Barack Obama’s efforts to raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 per hour have floundered on Capitol Hill.

Seattle’s new measure begins taking effect on April 1, 2015.

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