TIME Britain

Prince Harry Needs a New Job

Prince Harry Hosts Coach Core Graduation Ceremony
Chris Jackson—Getty Images Prince Harry chats with Coach Core graduates during a Coach Core Graduation event at St James's Palace on Jan. 14, 2015 in London, England.

The 30-year-old prince is leaving the armed forces after 10 years and is looking for a new job

It’s official: Prince Harry is looking for a new job.

The 30-year-old royal is set to end his 10-year military career, Kensington Palace confirmed in a statement on Tuesday. That career has seen Harry qualify as an Apache pilot and complete two tours of Afghanistan. Yet come June, when he will leave the armed forces, the prince will be “actively considering other longer term employment opportunities.”

In the statement, Harry said that, “After a decade of service, moving on from the Army has been a really tough decision. I consider myself incredibly lucky to have had the chance to do some very challenging jobs and have met many fantastic people in the process.” He added, “I am considering the options for the future and I am really excited about the possibilities…. So while I am finishing one part of my life, I am getting straight into a new chapter.”

Harry, who already serves as the patron of several charities, already lined up volunteering stints that could very well lead to a full-time gig.

The prince will be be spending part of the summer volunteering with field-based conservation experts in Africa and spending time learning how local communities in sub-Saharan Africa are working to protect and conserve natural resources and wildlife.

Following his time in Africa, Harry will head back to London, where he is slated to volunteer with the U.K.’s Ministry of Defense’s Recovery Capability program, which supports wounded, injured and sick military staff. He’ll also continue to work with case officers at London District’s Personnel Recovery Unit, which he has been doing since last year, alongside both those who are administering and receiving physical and mental care. According to Kensington Palace, this work “will enable him to continue developing his knowledge of the entire recovery process, placing him in an informed position to further support wounded, injured, or sick servicemen and women into the future.”

Working with veterans makes sense for Harry, who last year founded the Invictus Games, a multi-sport event for wounded military men and women. In Harry’s statement on Tuesday, he revealed his plans to continue his work with the event, saying he was set on “making sure the next few Invictus Games are as amazing as the last.”

Finding a suitable working role can be challenging for a royal, especially one wanting to avoid a fully packed schedule of official royal appearances and overseas tours—and one who has a reputation as a party boy. Many royals, past and present, have spent their time working with charities. Harry’s late mother, Princess Diana, was particularly known for her charity work, serving as president or patron of more than 100 charities. Similarly, Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, serves as the patron of various charities, including the East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices and the National Portrait Gallery. Then there’s Harry’s older brother William, the Duke of Cambridge, who has opted for service-based work. After seven years in the military himself, William is now gearing up to work as an air ambulance helicopter pilot, based in Cambridge and Norwich. (William, who is second in line to the throne, after his father Charles, has said he’ll donate his salary to charity.)

No matter what job Harry eventually chooses, he’ll have to balance it with his other lifelong work as a member of the royal family. The prince knows this. According to Kensington Palace, Harry will continue to support his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, attending official engagements in her honor, including embarking on a royal tour to New Zealand in May.

Read next: Prince Harry: Behind ‘My Tough Decision’ to Leave the Army

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TIME Australia

The Aussies Just Made the Queen’s Husband a Knight

The First World War exhibition open - London
Eddie Mulholland—The Telegraph/PA Wire/AP Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, attends the opening of "First World War in the Air" exhibition at the RAF Museum in Hendon, England, on Dec. 2, 2014

That's like "giving a Beyoncé CD to Jay-Z" says Aussie comic Adam Hills

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott spent Monday morning mired in controversy after his office kicked off Australia Day celebrations by making Britain’s Prince Philip a Knight of the Order of Australia.

Australians have long been acquainted with the 93-year-old royal, who is notorious for uttering headline-worthy gaffes. During a trip to the Lucky Country in 2002, the Duke of Edinburgh, as he is officially titled, asked an Aboriginal man: “Do you still throw spears at each other?”

Nevertheless, Abbott praised Prince Philip’s “long life of service” during a flag-raising ceremony in the Australian capital, Canberra, on Monday morning.

“This honor recognizes the contribution of the Duke of Edinburgh to Australia throughout the Queen’s 62-year reign,” read a statement released by Abbott’s office. “For three quarters of a century, Prince Philip has served the Crown, and the wider Commonwealth.”

Following the announcement, Australians took to social media to slam the decision to give the nation’s top honor to the Prince rather than an Australian.

Abbott attempted to defend the decision during an Australia Day function in Canberra.

“Social media is kind of like electronic graffiti and I think that in the media, you make a big mistake to pay too much attention to social media,” he told reporters, according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

TIME

Morning Must Reads: January 8

Capitol
Mark Wilson—Getty Images The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC.

Two Men Sought in Paris Attack

One suspect had surrendered early Thursday, after the worst terrorist attack in France in recent memory claimed 12 lives, as a manhunt for two other suspects continued to unfold. Here’s what to know about the attack on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo

Charlie Hebdo’s Provocative History

A look at the satirical newspaper that terrorists in Paris attacked, and a look back at the threats it’s faced since it was founded in 1970

Apple Bites Into Google

Google Android’s U.S. market share dipped for the first time, as Apple’s new large-screened phones made inroads in the market for “phablets”

Old-School Video Games Go Free Online

The Internet Archive, best known for running The Wayback Machine, has put Oregon Trailand other games enjoyed by children of the 1980s and ’90s online for free. Hitch up your oxen, find some water barrels and get ready for some westward expansion

NAACP Bombing Evokes Memories of Civil Rights Strife

The bomb that exploded outside an NAACP office in Colorado was a rare act of violence apparently aimed at the civil rights organization, bringing to mind an earlier era when threats of assassinations and bombings targeting the group were far more common

Jameis Winston to Enter NFL Draft

The father of Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston says he will forgo his final two seasons of eligibility and enter the 2015 NFL Draft. Winston, the 2013 Heisman Trophy winner, is expected to be a top pick in the draft

Prince Andrew Sex Scandal Has Big U.S. Stakes

A lawsuit that accuses Prince Andrew of having sex in three countries with the self-described “sex slave” of an American financier could transform the way federal prosecutors in the U.S. handle high-profile criminal settlements in the future.

Phylicia Rashad Says Defense of Bill Cosby Was Misquoted

Phylicia Rashad is setting the record straight about her recent comments defending former co-star Bill Cosby. “That is not what I said. What I said is, ‘this is not about the women. This is about something else,” she said

Divers Search for Black Boxes in Crashed AirAsia Plane

Divers were hoping to zero in on AirAsia Flight 8501’s black boxes Thursday, after search-and-recovery operations got a much-needed boost with the discovery of a chunk of the plane’s tail — nearly two weeks after it plummeted into the sea, killing everyone aboard

Clinical Trial for Ebola Drug Starts in Liberia

University of Oxford researchers have launched a trial of the drug, brincidofovir, in Doctors Without Borders’ Ebola center in Monrovia. The drug has previously been used to treat patients with Ebola in the United States

Clues Tie North Korea to Sony Hack

FBI Director James Comey revealed that the hackers “got sloppy” and mistakenly sent messages directly that could be traced to IP addresses used exclusively by North Korea. Comey said the hackers had sought to use proxy computer servers

California Overturns Foie Gras Ban

A federal judge on Wednesday overturned a state law banning the sale of the foie gras in California, ending a two-year-long ban on the luxury food that had placated animal-rights groups but upset the state’s high-end restaurants and gourmands

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TIME United Kingdom

British Royal Officials Weighing Prince Andrew’s Legal Options

Officials do not rule out the royal court taking legal action

In September 2013 armed police confronted a suspected intruder in the lush gardens of Buckingham Palace, provoking the target of their suspicions to howl with outrage: “Do you know who I am?” The officers offered apologies for failing to recognize Prince Andrew, but the Queen’s second son, fifth in line to the British throne, might not now be embroiled in controversy if he hadn’t been groping for an answer to the same question for more than a decade. Since retiring from the Royal Navy in 2001, he has been more at sea than ever.

The controversy relating to the disgraced U.S. financier Jeffrey Epstein shows no signs of dying down any time soon, no matter that Andrew is “incredibly clear” in the words of a royal source that he has done nothing wrong. A legal process against Epstein in the U.S. must take its course and Virginia Roberts, one of the litigants, is reported to be mulling a tell-all book. The palace usually refuses to comment on matters relating to the private lives of the royals but has been bounced into making two extraordinary statements, the first on Jan. 2 rejecting “any suggestion of impropriety with underage minors” by the Prince as “categorically untrue”; the second on Jan. 4 referring to Andrew by his official title. “It is emphatically denied,” said the palace, “that HRH The Duke of York had any form of sexual contact or relationship with Virginia Roberts. The allegations made are false and without any foundation.”

MORE: Rude Royal: WikiLeaks Reveals Prince Andrew’s Undiplomatic Remarks

The second rebuttal came in response to an interview with Roberts in the Mail on Sunday. She alleged she had worked for Epstein for three years as a “sex slave” and had on three separate occasions while only 17 been steered by him to sexual contacts with the Prince. Roberts waived anonymity to give the interview. In December, as “Jane Doe 3,” she had joined a civil suit in a Florida court with three other women, all claiming past abuse by Epstein and objecting to the arrangement that saw him convicted in 2008 on a charge of procuring an underaged person for prostitution rather than answering in court to the allegations of Roberts and her fellow litigants. The documents lodged by Roberts in the civil suit not only allege sexual relations with the Prince and with Epstein but also with the former Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz, who has vigorously denied the claims and used an interview with the BBC to accuse Roberts of lying. In a second BBC interview, Dershowitz said he hoped for the opportunity to test Roberts’ allegations in court and urged Prince Andrew to “take whatever legal action is available.” Lawyers consulting with palace officials have indicated that the options for such action appear limited. Even if a case could be brought, palace sources are aware that such a course would be fraught with risk, at very least dragging back into the public eye the messy backstory that brought Andrew into Epstein’s orbit.

It’s at very least a tale of money and poor judgment. The Prince is by no means the only senior royal to seek out wealthy company, lured by the apparent protection such company affords — the secluded retreats, the private security, the largesse. Andrew, like his big brother Charles, often seeks to raise money for his own charitable ventures. But in 2010, when Andrew’s ex-wife Sarah Ferguson — “Fergie” — came close to bankruptcy, charity began closer to home with Epstein helping to pay off her debts. This embarrassing revelation emerged after a photographer snapped Epstein, recently released after serving 13 months of his 18-month jail sentence, strolling through Central Park in New York in conversation with the Prince. Andrew’s decision to maintain the friendship despite Epstein’s criminal conviction unleashed a wave of criticism that eventually precipitated the royal’s 2011 resignation from his post as the U.K.’s special representative for international trade and investment. It wasn’t a paid job but had been the Prince’s main occupation since his navy days.

MORE: Prince Andrew Abseils Down Europe’s Tallest Skyscraper

The challenge for Andrew and his palace minders has long been how to keep him meaningfully occupied and out of the headlines. There isn’t really enough royal work to go round, especially since the younger generation has started to pitch in. The Prince’s penchant for the good life earned him the nickname “Air Miles Andy” and has resulted in a trove of images that consolidated his image as a playboy, including a shot of him on Epstein’s yacht in 2001 surrounded by topless women and, from the same year, with his arm around the waist of a pretty blond: Virginia Roberts.

He has also broken bread with some pretty dodgy people, sometimes of choice and sometimes at the behest of the U.K. government, which likes to deploy royal soft power around the world. Until the financier’s downfall and conviction, Epstein appeared reasonably respectable by comparison, with a circle of friends that has been reported to include former President Bill Clinton among other well-known figures. The litigants have questioned whether Epstein’s connections helped him to strike his 2008 plea bargain. A royal source says that Prince Andrew vehemently denies having interceded with the U.S. authorities on Epstein’s behalf.

Another source speaks of the quiet work that has gone into carving out a lower profile set of activities for Andrew in the years since his association with Epstein tipped him out of the U.K. trade role. He had seemed, rather later in life, to be finding himself by focusing on charitable work, says the source. The fresh scandal threatens to define him in quite different terms, and risks contagion to the wider Windsor brand, and that is why palace officials will not fully rule out any options about what may happen, not even the prospect of the royal court seeking redress from a court of law.

Read next: Palace ‘Emphatically’ Denies Prince Andrew Had Sex With Teen as Alleged Victim Speaks Out

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME portfolio

The Best Pictures of the Week: Dec. 5 – Dec. 12

From the ongoing protests against police brutality in the U.S. and the dismantling of the main pro-democracy protest camp in Hong Kong to the British royal couple’s first New York visit and Malala Yousafzai receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

TIME

Morning Must Reads: December 8

Capitol
Mark Wilson—Getty Images The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC.

California Protests Turn Violent

A second night of protest against police killings in Missouri and New York City turned violent again in Berkeley, Calif., as some demonstrators threw explosives at officers, assaulted each other and shut down a freeway, police said

Why Dealing With Uncertainty is Easier for Some People

A study identifies personality traits that may distinguish those who are better or worse at waiting — some of which, thankfully, may be adaptable

Behind the Rescue Op in Yemen

Navy SEALs flew into southern Yemen early on Saturday to rescue American captive Luke Somers, but they only succeeded in rescuing his body

U.S. Gas Prices Hit 4-Year Low

The average price of a gallon of regular gasoline has dropped 12¢ over the past two weeks, reaching a four-year low, a new survey finds. The falloff is attributed to a spike in crude-oil production in North America, a slowdown in demand and a strong dollar

Hunger Games: Mockingjay Tops Box-Office for Third Week

Mockingjay benefits from star power, family friendliness and established popularity. But even so, its box-office power is less attributable to esteem for the franchise than to the fact that it doesn’t have much competition right now

Ebola Patient Reveals Identity

A doctor who contracted Ebola while treating patients in Sierra Leone and was evacuated to the U.S. for care in September has revealed his identity. The viral load in his blood was 100 times that of the facility’s other patients

Prince William and Kate Arrive in New York City

Prince William and Kate arrived in New York City on Sunday night for a three-day trip, the most anticipated royal visit since the glory days of Diana. “The level of excitement in New York has been absolutely phenomenal,” said the British consul general

U.S. Transfers 6 Guantanamo Detainees

The men were moved from Guantanamo Bay to Uruguay, marking the largest group to depart the prison since 2009 and first resettle in South America. The detainees include four Syrians, a Tunisian and a Palestinian

Democrats Sink in the South

The fall of Sen. Mary Landrieu means Louisiana won’t have a Democratic statewide elected official for the first time since 1876. The Republican Party will control every Senate seat, governor’s mansion and legislative chamber from the Carolinas to Texas

Boyhood Wins Another Top Prize

The Los Angeles Film Critics Association has awarded Boyhood four prizes, including Best Picture, in the latest coup for the coming-of-age movie. Just a day earlier, the Boston Society of Film Critics honored the film with five awards, also including Best Picture

New Delhi Bans Uber Following Rape Accusation

The city of New Delhi banned popular ride-sharing service Uber on Monday afternoon, a few days after a 27-year-old female passenger accused one of its drivers of sexually assaulting her. However the ban is not in connection with the alleged attack but rather transport laws

Inventor of First Gaming Console Dies

Ralph Baer, the man known for creating the first-ever video-game console, which still serves as a blueprint for the Xboxes and PlayStations of today, has passed away aged 92. Over the course of his career, he accumulated over 150 patents and won many awards and honors

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TIME Family

Why Being Second Born Can Be a Royal Pain

Meet the family: It's that little one on the right you have to watch out for
JOHN STILLWELL; AFP/Getty Images Meet the family: It's that little one on the right you have to watch out for

An open letter to George's Number Two: regal or not, second-borns can get a rotten deal

Dear Pending Prince or Princess:

First of all, the other seven billion of us are just thrilled to hear the happy news that you’re on the way—in a gender yet to be announced and with a name yet to be determined. I realize you’ll have your hands full for the next several months doing things like, well, growing hands, so I don’t want to burden you with too much right now. But before long you’ll emerge into the world and meet your royal Mum and Dad—and guess what? You’ll have a royal big brother too.

I know, I know, sorry to break it to you. You were kind of hoping you’d be the first and, if it were at all possible to arrange it, the only. Well, welcome to the club, kid. From one Number Two to another, here’s a frank admission: it’s a lousy gig—except when it’s great.

Every first child will always be a family’s crown prince or princess, which is all the more relevant in your family because the whole crown thing is for real. As a rule, first-borns are more serious than later-borns; they work harder, are better students and their IQ tends to be about three points higher than that of second-borns. They are also much more inclined than later-borns to go into the family business—which, yes, in your case is kind of the whole point. You should get accustomed to hearing your brother and you referred to as “an heir and a spare,” which is a term you won’t understand at first, then you will, and will go on to loathe for the rest of your natural life.

There’s a reason all this is true—and in commoner families too, not just yours. Think of your clan not so much as just Royal Family, but as Royal Family Inc. Moms and Dads have a finite supply of hours, energy and money—though in some families (we’re not pointing fingers here) there’s a little more of the latter than in others. The point is, your parents pour all their resources into the first product to come off the assembly line (let’s call it, for example, George v. 1.0). By the time the next one rolls along (let’s call this one You v. 2.0) there’s no getting that early investment back. This is what’s known to business people as sunk costs, which you’ll learn about at Eaton and Oxford and will later get to forget about because your exchequers and ministers will see to such things. The point is, in both a family and a company, sunk costs lead the board of directors (Mum and Dad in your case) to value the first product more than the second, whether they realize it or not.

This is an arrangement that suits that first product just fine, which is why big brothers and sisters tend to play by the rules. Your job—and the job of any littler royals who may come along after you—will be to try to upset that order. It’s why later-borns tend to be more rebellious and to take more risks than first-borns. You’ll be likelier to play extreme sports than big bro George. Even if you and he play the same sports, you’ll choose a more physical position—a baseball catcher, say, instead of an outfielder. (Baseball is…never mind. Ask someone in the royal court what the soccer and polo analogy are.) In the event you ever become Ruler of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of other Realms and Territories around the world—and you’re fourth in line for the job, so don’t start getting measured for the cape yet—you’d be a more liberal, less conventional monarch than your big bro will be.

Later-borns are more inclined to be artists too, and if there is a comedian in the family, it’s likeliest to be the very last-born. This makes sense, since when you’re the smallest person in the nursery, you are in constant risk of getting clocked by someone bigger—sorry, no royal dispensation on that rule—so you learn to disarm with humor. You also may find you’re more empathic and intuitive than George, since you similarly have to know how to suss out what people are thinking in order to get your way—what scientists call a low-power strategy, rather than the big sib’s high-power one.

There are other perils that come with being a number two, not least figuring out ways to get yourself noticed, and it’s best to go about that one carefully. One day, ask your Uncle Andy about a special friend of his named Miss Stark—and if you really want to get a laugh, call her Auntie Koo. Ask Uncle Harry to show you pictures of his recent visit to a Las Vegas hotel. On second thought, don’t, but do remember that there is only a narrow window available to you for being photographed naked—you’ll get a grace period of about 12 months after you arrive. Uncle Harry exceeded that by a teensy bit.

The point is, you’ll have to figure out ways to be special, to make a difference, while staying off of TMZ and out of the tabs. The upside? Well, you know that thing about big sibs having a higher IQ? That’s because they mentor and look after the little sibs, which isn’t half bad (trust another Number Two’s word on this one too). And if more kids come along, you get to be the mentor, which is its own kind of wonderful. The downside? Then you’ll be a middle child. And I hate to tell you kid, but that gig stinks no matter who you are.

But all that comes later. For now, enjoy the quiet, brace for the noise, and travel safe.

–A Friend in the Colonies

TIME medicine

Kate Middleton Has Morning Sickness—Again

It’s déjà vu for Duchess of Cambridge. Another pregnancy, another battle with morning sickness.

Along with the good news that Kate Middleton is pregnant and expecting her second child, who would be fourth in line to the throne, Middleton also revealed that she is suffering from hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of morning sickness that landed her in the hospital during her first pregnancy.

Having the condition during a previous pregnancy increases the chances that it will recur, which may explain Middleton’s circumstances. Consistent nausea and vomiting can lead to dehydration and deficiencies in some important nutrients, say experts, so expectant moms who can’t keep food down are treated with IV fluids. It’s generally not dangerous to the developing fetus, unless the mom-to-be doesn’t gain enough weight during pregnancy, which can lead to lower-birth weight babies. (George, her first child, was born at a healthy 8 pounds, 6 ounces.)

This time, the Duke and Duchess’ office says, she is being treated at home, which for her is Kensington Palace.

For those who might have forgotten, hyperemesis gravidarum can be caused by hormonal changes occurring during the first three months of pregnancy—specifically the steep rise in human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), which is released by the placenta as it readies to nourish the fetus.

Presence of hydatidform moles, or a growth inside the uterus, can also trigger the severe nausea and vomiting.

There’s something else that often triggers the morning sickness: twins. No word just yet from the royals on whether George will be joined by more than one sibling.

TIME uk

Prince William and Kate Are Expecting Another Baby

This will be the royal couple's second child, and betting has already begun in earnest on whether it will be a boy or a girl

It’s official: The Duchess of Cambridge is pregnant with her second child. A tweet posted Monday from the official account of the British monarchy confirmed that Kate Middleton, who married Prince William in 2011 and gave birth to their son Prince George in July 2013, is expecting another baby.

“The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are very pleased to announce that The Duchess of Cambridge is expecting their second child,” the tweet said.

Royal officials told the Associated Press that the Duchess was being treated for severe morning sickness, and Prime Minister David Cameron said he was “delighted by the happy news.”

Since William is second in line to the British throne, this would make the upcoming addition to the royal family fourth in the order of succession.

TIME uk

Prince William’s New Job? Medevac Helicopter Pilot

RAF Search And Rescue Teams Practice Ahead Of The Royal Wedding
Handout—Getty Images In this image provided by the Ministry of Defence, Prince William takes the controls of a Sea King helicopter on April 14, 2011 in Holyhead, Wales.

Prince William will begin training this fall and start work spring 2015

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, a former chopper pilot in the Royal Air Force, is taking a job as an air ambulance helicopter pilot next spring, according to Kensington Palace.

Prince William will begin training for the new role this fall and winter before working with the East Anglian Air Ambulance in England. The Duke will fly both day and night shifts, starting as a co-pilot before he may qualify as a helicopter commander.

Better known for his marriage to Kate Middleton than for his flying abilities, the palace added that though this will be his main job, he’ll continue his domestic and overseas visits that have been so widely documented, with his wife or son in tow. Prince William will also continue working for his various charities.

Though he is entitled to a salary, the Duke will be donating his medevac income to charity. He is believed to be the first member of the Royal Family in direct succession to have an employment contract with a civilian employer. The job will draw on Prince William’s experience as a search and rescue pilot for the RAF, for which he flew over 150 operations.

 

 

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