TIME Crime

Watch: New Yorkers Continue to Call for Justice for Eric Garner

New poll approves of New York's mayor handling of demonstrations

Two weeks after a grand jury’s decision not to indict a police officer in the death of a black man spurred waves of protests in New York City and around the country, some organizers of the protests will meet with the city’s mayor on Friday.

A poll released Wednesday reveals that the majority of New Yorkers approve of the way Mayor Bill de Blasio has handled the demonstrations taking place around the city to protest the killings of unarmed black men by police officers.

Earlier this week, thousands of New Yorkers poured out of Washington Square Park as part of Millions March NYC and demonstrators took to the streets in other cities to march in solidarity. These were the latest in a series of demonstrations following two separate grand jury decisions not to indict white police officers who killed unarmed black men on Staten Island and in Ferguson.

Groups chanted, “I can’t breath,” the last words of Garner, the 43-year-old father of six who died in July by after a NYPD officer held him in a “chokehold”.

“We sit at home, we’re sad at what we see on the news, but it’s not enough to do that,” said a woman who identified herself as Robyn. “You have to make a stand and say what you believe,” she added. Robyn, who is a mother of three black sons, says that the safety of men like her sons is threatened by police.

“There is more white than black, more young than old,” a woman said of the individuals marching.

The phrase “black lives matter” served as a mantra for many demonstrators who voiced frustration regarding the killings of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Tamir Rice, all killed by police within the past months.

“We felt like we wanted to be here as a family and be a part of the movement,” said Carrie Gleason, a white woman who participated in the march with her partner and small child. She added, “it is our responsibility like anybody else’s.”

TIME

The Most Powerful Protest Photos of 2014

There wasn't a corner of the planet untouched by protest this year, from the tear-gassed streets of Ferguson to the student camps of Hong Kong

In 2011, TIME named the Protester as the Person of the Year, in recognition of the twin people-power earthquakes of the Arab Spring and Occupy Wall Street. TIME named the Ebola Fighters as the 2014 Person of the Year, but you could have forgiven if we went back to the Protester. There wasn’t a corner of the planet untouched by protest this year, from the tear-gassed streets of Ferguson, Missouri, to the squares of Mexico City, to the impromptu student camps of Hong Kong. Many of the protests were remarkably peaceful, like Occupy Hong Kong, which was galvanized by public anger over the overreaction of the city’s police. Others turned bloody, like the Euromaidan protests in Kiev, Ukraine, which eventually brought down the government of pro-Russian Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, in turn triggering a war that led to the annexation of Crimea by Russia, the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in May and the deaths of thousands of Ukrainians.

Not every protest was as effective as those that began the year in the cold of Kiev. Hong Kongers still don’t have full democratic rights, gay rights are on the retreat in much of east Africa and every day seems to bring news of another questionable police killing in the U.S. But the wave of social action that ended 2014 is unlikely to crest in 2015. The ubiquity of camera phones means no shortage of iconic photographs and videos from any protest, whether in Lima or Los Angeles, and social media gives everyone the means to broadcast. What follows are some of the most powerful images from the global streets in 2014.

TIME Germany

10,000 People Protest Against Islam in the German City of Dresden

Participants hold a banner during a demonstration called by anti-immigration group Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamization of the West (Pegida) in Dresden, Germany, on Dec. 15, 2014 Hannibal Hanschke—Reuters

Protesters demand immigration-policy overhaul, ruling politicians label them "Nazis in pinstripes"

A march against the “Islamization of the West” in the German city of Dresden attracted about 10,000 people on Monday.

Participants gathered under banners reading “Protect our homeland” and “No Shari‘a law in Europe,” but also the famous slogan “We are the people,” used during the demonstrations that led up to the fall of the Berlin Wall, reports the BBC.

“There’s freedom of assembly in Germany, but there’s no place for incitement and lies about people who come to us from other countries,” said Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin.

“Everyone [who attends] needs to be careful that they are not taken advantage of by the people who organize such events.”

It is the ninth week in a row that a movement called Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamization of the West (Pegida) is organizing protests in the German state of Saxony, but Monday’s march is the biggest by far.

Frauke Petry, Dresden leader of the Pegida-sympathetic party Alternativ für Deutschland, said the march was “protesting against inadequate legislation on asylum rights.”

Germany accepts more asylum seekers than any other country, and immigration rates have surged because of the wars in Syria and Iraq. However, a mere 2% of Saxony’s population is foreign, and only a fraction of them Muslim, the New York Times points out.

Considering the country’s troubled past with extreme right-wing politics, the protests have shocked many Germans. Justice Minister Heiko Maas has called them “a disgrace” and the Social Democrats, part of the ruling coalition, have branded them “Nazis in pinstripes.”

TIME Crime

Thousands Rally Against Police Brutality in Washington and New York City

In Washington, DC, New York City and around the country, Americans staged protests over the deaths of unarmed citizens by police

Demonstrators numbering in the tens of thousands marched on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. and in New York City on Saturday, as well as other cities across the U.S., to protest the killings of unarmed black men by police officers.

In the nation’s capital, the families of black men killed by police, including relatives of Staten Island resident Eric Garner, Ferguson, Mo. teenager Michael Brown, and Cleveland, Ohio 12-year-0ld Tamir Rice and others, joined civil rights groups and other demonstrators at the Justice For All march. The marchers called for an end to police killings and for law enforcement who kill unarmed citizens to be held to account for their actions.

In New York City, protestors held signs featuring the words “I am Eric Garner” and chanted what has become a rallying cry of the movement to end police killings of unarmed black men: “Hands up/Don’t shoot.” Andre Irving, 31 and black, attended the rally with his father Mark Irving, 57. “I’m worried for my safety, the safety of my family, my friends, my neighbors,” he told TIME. “Can I go to the store and walk home without being killed?”

Eva Osborne, 8, wore a pin featuring the words “I can’t breathe,” some of the last words Eric Garner spoke before he dies in a video of his arrest, and a phrase that has also been used as a rallying call. “I have a black brother and a black dad,” she said. Her brother is five, her father 43, the same age as Eric Garner. “When my brother grows up, he might be treated the same way.”

Police declined to estimate the size of the ground in Washington, the New York Times reports, but media estimates place the size of the crowd in the tens of thousands. Police in New York City estimated the crowd size at roughly 12,000.

The protests mark a new level of civil action in weeks of sometimes violent unrest around the country, as citizens erupted in mass outrage after no charges were brought against police officers responsible for killing Brown, an unarmed teenager shot by police in Ferguson, and Garner, an unarmed Staten Island man who died after being aggressively subdued by police during his arrest for illegally selling cigarettes on the street.

The Justice For All march in Washington was spearheaded by the National Action Network led by Al Sharpton. Some demonstrators, expressing disdain at those they considered celebrity protestors, disrupted the proceedings at a pre-march rally, The Washington Post reports.

TIME portfolio

The Best Pictures of the Week: Dec. 5 – Dec. 12

From the ongoing protests against police brutality in the U.S. and the dismantling of the main pro-democracy protest camp in Hong Kong to the British royal couple’s first New York visit and Malala Yousafzai receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

TIME NBA

NBA Won’t Fine Players for Wearing ‘I Can’t Breathe’ T-shirts

Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James warms up before an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets at the Barclays Center on Dec. 8, 2014, in New York.
Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James warms up before an NBA basketball game against the Brooklyn Nets at the Barclays Center on Dec. 8, 2014, in New York. Jason Szenes—EPA

League rules require that players wear attire of Adidas, who provides the NBA's apparel, during pre-game activities

The NBA will not fine players for wearing “I Can’t Breathe” t-shirts in honor of a Staten Island man who died after police placed him a chokehold in July, reports ESPN’s Jeremy Schaap.

Chicago Bulls guard Derrick Rose wore an “I Can’t Breathe” shirt on Saturday during warm-ups before Chicago’s game against the Golden State Warriors to honor Eric Garner. Thousands across the country have protested after a grand jury decided last Wednesday not to indict the officer who put the chokehold on Garner.

Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James, guard Kyrie Irving and Brooklyn Nets forward Kevin Garnett and guards Deron Williams, Jarrett Jack and Alan Anderson all wore “I Can’t Breathe” shirts before Monday’s night contest at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn.

Outside of the Barclays Center before the game, about 200 protesters chanted “I Can’t Breathe!” and “No justice! No peace! No racist police!”

“I respect Derrick Rose and all of our players for voicing their personal views on important issues but my preference would be for players to abide by our on-court attire rules,” NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said.

League rules require that players wear attire of Adidas, who provides the NBA’s apparel, during pre-game activities.

“You hear the slogan ‘NBA cares’ and it’s more evident than now to show some support,” Garnett said. “Obviously we’re not on the front line of this movement, but I think it’s important being from these communities and supporting these communities.”

This article originally appeared on SI.com

TIME Crime

See the Violent Protests in California Over Police Killings

Protests in Berkeley, Calif. over the police killings of Michael Brown and Eric Garner turned violent over the weekend. Police clashed with demonstrators, deploying tear gas, for two consecutive nights, and several stores were looted

TIME justice

Chokehold-Death Protest Gets Violent in California

A protester flees as police officers try to disperse a crowd comprised largely of student demonstrators during a protest against police violence in the U.S., in Berkeley
A protester flees as police officers try to disperse a crowd comprised largely of student demonstrators during a protest against police violence in in Berkeley, Calif. Dec. 7, 2014. Noah Berger—Reuters

Across the nation, overwhelmingly peaceful demonstrations in solidarity with Eric Garner continued

(NEW YORK) — Mostly peaceful protests of a grand jury’s decision not to indict a white police officer in the chokehold death of an unarmed black man continued around the country, but authorities said a march in California turned violent when a splinter group smashed windows and threw objects at police.

A Berkeley police officer received hospital treatment for a dislocated shoulder after being hit with a sandbag, while another sustained minor injuries, police spokeswoman Jenn Coats said.

She said several businesses were looted and damaged when a splinter group broke off from the peaceful demonstration Saturday night, and officers attempting to get the crowd to disperse used smoke and tear gas. Protesters threw rocks, bricks, bottles, pipes and other objects at officers, and some squad cars were damaged.

At least six people had been arrested by the time the unrest ended early Sunday morning, Coats said.

Thousands of demonstrators have protested peacefully in New York and elsewhere since the announcement Wednesday that a grand jury declined to indict a white officer in the death of Eric Garner, a black man who gasped “I can’t breathe!” while being placed in a chokehold as he was being arrested for selling loose, untaxed cigarettes. The decision closely followed a Ferguson, Missouri, grand jury’s choice not to indict a white officer in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old.

The scope of the demonstrations and the lack of violence were moving to Garner’s mother and widow, they said Saturday.

“It is just so awesome to see how the crowds are out there,” said Eric Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr, who added that she ended up stuck in her car after protests shut down traffic.

“I was just so proud of that crowd,” Carr said. “It just warmed my heart.”

Garner’s widow, Esaw Garner, said she saw demonstrators from her apartment window and told her son, “Look at all the love that your father’s getting.”

Officers have said the outcry over the grand jury decision has left them feeling betrayed and demonized by everyone from the president and the mayor to throngs of protesters who scream at them on the street.

“Police officers feel like they are being thrown under the bus,” said Patrick Lynch, president of the police union.

Garner’s family members joined the Rev. Al Sharpton later Saturday as Sharpton laid a wreath at the site on Staten Island where Garner died July 17 in a confrontation that started when police tried to arrest him.

An amateur video seen by millions showed Garner gasping, “I can’t breathe” during the fatal encounter.

“All we’re concerned about is justice from the police,” said Garner’s stepfather, Benjamin Carr, who wore a T-shirt with the words, “Enough is enough.”

Protests continued in New York City for a fourth day with several dozen people lying down on the floor of Grand Central Terminal and marching into stores in Times Square. There were no reports of arrests.

Protests have also been held in Philadelphia, Chicago, Miami, Las Vegas and a number of other cities.

In Seattle, several hundred people marched downtown to police headquarters Saturday. Authorities said a group then split off from the main protest and tried to get onto a roadway. Police say some protesters threw rocks at officers who blocked them from entering it. Seven were arrested.

Sharpton announced plans this week for a march in Washington, D.C., next Saturday to protest the killings of Garner, Brown and others and to press for change at the federal level.

 

TIME NBA

Bulls’ Derrick Rose Wears ‘I Can’t Breathe’ Shirt During Warmups

Chicago Bulls guard Derrick Rose wears a shirt reading "I Can't Breath" while warming up for a game against the Golden State Warriors on Dec. 6, 2014 at the United Center in Chicago.
Chicago Bulls guard Derrick Rose wears a shirt reading "I Can't Breath" while warming up for a game against the Golden State Warriors on Dec. 6, 2014 at the United Center in Chicago. Chris Sweda—Chicago Tribune/Landov

In support of Eric Garner, a Staten Island man killed by a police chokehold in July

Chicago Bulls guard Derrick Rose sported an “I Can’t Breathe” shirt in pregame warmups before Saturday’s game against the Golden State Warriors. The shirt was in support of Eric Garner, a Staten Island man who died after being placed in a chokehold by police in July.

Protests across the country have collected steam after a grand jury on Wednesday declined to indict NYPD officer Daniel Pantaleo in the death of Garner. Pantaleo placed Garner in the chokehold while arresting him for allegedly selling untaxed cigarettes. “I can’t breathe” were reportedly among Garner’s last words before his death, which was ruled a homicide by the medical examiner’s office.

Last week, a group of St. Louis Rams players made the “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” gesture used by protestors in Ferguson, Mo., and across the country in the wake of the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown. St. Louis prosecutor Robert McCulloch announced last week that a grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson, the Ferguson police officer who fatally shot Brown.

This article originally appeared on SI.com

TIME Know Right Now

Know Right Now: From Nationwide Protests to a Historic Space Launch

Watch this week's #KnowRightNow to catch up on all the latest stories

This week, Cyber Monday shattered records with sales surpassing $2 billion. Sales were up 17% compared to last year, making it the biggest shopping day ever.

Protests flared around the country after a grand jury decided there would be no indictment in the case of Eric Garner, a black man who died while being violently subdued by the NYPD. Protesters blocked major roadways in Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, and Washington D.C., and more than 200 protesters were arrested in New York alone.

The Orion spacecraft successfully launched Friday morning, orbiting 3,600 miles above the planet, 15 times higher than the International Space Station. The spacecraft orbited Earth twice before landing in the Pacific Ocean.

And finally, Warner Bros. revealed the cast for its movie Suicide Squad this week. The film will feature Will Smith as Deadshot, Tom Hardy as Rick Flagg, Jared Leto as The Joker, and Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn. It’s slated for release in 2016.

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