TIME Aviation

Indiana Teen Dies While Flying Around The World

The father-son team were flying around the globe.

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17-year old Haris Suleman’s body has been recovered after the plane he and his father, Babar Suleman, were flying went down the coast of Samoa.

The plane crash occurred on Tuesday as the two were attempting to fly around the world in 30 days. If successful, Haris would have been the youngest person to accomplish such a feat.

Haris’ father Babar is considered missing at this time, as rescuers search around the site of the crash. The reason for the plane going down is currently unknown.

TIME

After the MH17 Ukraine Crash, Malaysians Face Another Catastrophe

Malaysia Airlines hit again
Malaysia Airlines endures its second major accident of 2014 Photo by Rahman Roslan/Getty Images

Four months after MH370 went missing, Malaysia endures another horrific plane accident, leaving relatives of victims bewildered

Two Malaysia Airlines flight attendants embrace at Kuala Lumpur International Airport. They hold on to each other for a moment, then wipe their tears and straighten their light-blue, flowered dresses. Today, these uniforms signal so much more than an employment at an airline. They declare community—a message as important as any, in this time of sorrow and anger.

Malaysia is in a state of shock. Only four months have passed since MH flight 370 vanished into thin air on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Now, the unthinkable has happened again. MH17, heading from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, exploded in midair, scattering charred aircraft and body parts over a vast field in an embattled province in eastern Ukraine.

Once again, crisis groups have been assembled in the Malaysian capital of Kuala Lumpur, grieving relatives gathered, press conferences held. On Friday evening, a ”rescue” team including forensic experts and a group of Malaysia Airlines volunteers boarded a private plane to Kiev to partake in the investigation on the ground—an investigation that, because of conflict on the ground in Ukraine, may prove all but impossible. Yet back home, Malaysian feel stuck in a state of ghastly déjà vu.

”We haven’t collected ourselves yet from flight 370,” a pilot at Malaysia Airlines who wishes to stay unnamed tells TIME. He says that he flew on several occasions with the co-pilot on MH370, but didn’t know anybody in the crew personally this time. Yet, it was with a heavy heart he came to work this morning. ”None of us said anything to each other, but we didn’t have to. We knew. Right now, I have very mixed emotions. Sadness and anger. How can something like this happen in 2014? You can’t just shoot down a plane!”

Although it’s not yet been confirmed how MH17 crashed, most early opinions—including from defense officials in Washington—point to a ground-to-air missile strike. Pro-Russian rebels have recently been bragging about their seizure of missile systems that would be capable of hitting planes flying at high altitude, and which may have been used against Ukrainian cargo planes that were downed over the past week.

But while basic questions about the crash are still unresolved, relatives of passengers on MH17 face none of the agonizing uncertainty that surrounded the fate of MH370’s victims. Graphic of that debris-strewn field in Ukraine have seen to that. ”My cousins knew when they saw the reports on CNN,” says Johari Redzuan at Marriott Hotel in Kuala Lumpur, where the bereaved relatives have been gathered. “They were in constant touch with their sister ahead of her trip, so they knew exactly what flight she was on. They were all looking so much forward to it.”

Redzuan’s late cousin hadn’t been home for five years, but now they were planning to celebrate Eid-ul Fitr, the end of Ramadan, together for the first time since she moved to Geneva, over 40 years ago.

“You would think that we would be raging because someone killed our relatives, but we’re not,” says Redzuan, trying to explain the surprising calm of many relatives at the Marriott. ”Maybe it has to do with our fasting, but there’s really a feeling of togetherness here at the hotel. When the Deputy Prime Minister came here to talk to us, we joined together in prayer for the rescue team in Ukraine. They have to travel through such dangerous terrain to get to the crash site.”

Redzuan admits that he’s still in shock, and that the crying goes on intermittently upstairs in their rooms, with every call or discussion leading back to memories of their departed sister or cousin. Yet, they’re licensed to grieve, with a certainty that relatives of MH370 victims never had. In that, at least, they can find comfort, gratitude and unity.

TIME

Malaysia Airlines Ukraine Crash: 2 Dogs Aboard Airplane

Air Malaysia Passenger Jet Crashes In Eastern Ukraine
Debris from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 is shown smouldering in a field July 17, 2014 in Grabovo, Ukraine near the Russian border. Pierre Crom—Getty Images

The cargo manifest from MH017 reveals that several live animals also went down with MH017

In addition to the 298 people aboard the Malaysian Airlines jet that crashed Thursday in eastern Ukraine, two dogs were also aboard the flight, according to the cargo manifest for the flight made public Friday.

MH017 – Cargo Manifest 1

The Kuala Lumpur-bound Flight MH17 crashed Thursday evening in a part of Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian separatists. The government of Ukraine alleges that insurgents shot down the Boeing 777, a charge the rebels have denied.

Five “live birds” and four pigeons also went down with the two dogs in the plane’s cargo bay.

TIME #MH17

Malaysia Airlines Ukraine Crash: Family Bumped From Flight

Debris from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 is shown smouldering in a field July 17, 2014 in Grabovo, Ukraine.
Debris from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 is shown smouldering in a field July 17, 2014 in Grabovo, Ukraine. Pierre Crom—Getty Images

"We were supposed to be on that flight"

While the family and friends of passengers on Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 are searching for answers, another family is counting their blessings.

Barry and Izzy Sim, along with their baby son, had planned on boarding the very flight that later crashed in eastern Ukraine on Thursday. But when they arrived at Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, the couple were told there were not enough seats on the plane for all of them. Instead the family switched to a later flight with KLM airlines.

“We were supposed to be on that flight,” a visibly emotional Izzy Sim told the BBC, after learning that their original flight had crashed. “There must have been someone watching over us and saying ‘you must not get on that flight.'”

All 298 aboard the flight were killed in the crash. Of those aboard, 154 people were from the Netherlands, 27 from Australia, 43 from Malaysia, 12 from Indonesia, 9 from the United Kingdom and others from Europe, the Philippines and Canada, according to a statement from Malaysia Airlines.

“You get this sick feeling in the pit of your stomach,” said Barry, describing his reaction to the news that the plane had crashed. “We started getting butterflies. Your heartbeat starts going.”

But Barry, originally from Scotland, said the family was still planning on flying to Malaysia, despite the tragedy. “In my mind, lightning never strikes twice in the same place so I am still philosophical that you get on the flight and you go about your life,” he said. “I know my wife doesn’t feel like that. Probably the last thing she wants to do now is fly, especially to Kuala Lumpur.”

Clutching her baby son, Izzy explained, “We are very loyal to Malaysia Airlines and we always want to fly with Malaysia Airlines.” But, “at this moment we are so glad to be [booked] on that KLM flight rather than that Malaysia Airlines flight.”

[BBC]

TIME Australia

Top AIDS Researchers Killed in Malaysia Airlines Crash

The huge loss may stall HIV/AIDS research

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About 100 people traveling to a global AIDS conference in Australia were on board the Malaysia Airlines flight that crashed and killed 298 people in eastern Ukraine, reports the Sydney Morning Herald.

The researchers, health workers and activists were on their way to the International AIDS Conference in Melbourne. Among the victims planning to attend was Dutch national Joep Lange, a top AIDS researcher and former International AIDS Society president. Briton Glenn Thomas, a spokesperson for the World Health Organization and a former BBC journalist, was also on flight MH17.

The International AIDS Society expressed sadness over the news that its colleagues were on the Malaysian jetliner.

“At this incredibly sad and sensitive time the IAS stands with our international family and sends condolences to the loved ones of those who have been lost to this tragedy,” the group said in a statement.

Friends and colleagues of those within the AIDS-research community, including UNAIDS executive director Michel Sidibé, also expressed shock and grief over the tragic deaths on Twitter.

While the medical field mourns the lives of those killed, experts like Associate Professor Brian Owler, federal president of the Australian Medical Association, also fear that breakthroughs in HIV/AIDS research will now be stalled.

“The amount of knowledge that these people who died on the plane were carrying with them and the experiences they had developed will have a devastating impact on HIV research,” Owler told TIME.

“The amount of time it takes to get to a stage where you can come up with those ideas cannot be replaced in a short amount of time. So it does set back work for a cure and strategic prevention of HIV/AIDS very significantly,” he said.

With reporting by Ian Neubauer / Sydney

TIME Malaysia

Malaysia Airlines Flight Crashes in Ukraine

There were reportedly 295 people aboard

A Malaysia Airlines passenger plane crashed in eastern Ukraine Thursday, and was widely suspected to have been shot down by forces on the ground.

“We have this information. A Boeing 777 traveling from Amsterdam to Kuala-Lampur crashed north of Torez [in eastern Ukraine],” Vladislav Seleznev, a spokesman for the Ukrainian armed forces, told RIA Novosti news agency. The flight was carrying 280 passengers and 15 crew members.

Although there was no direct evidence pointing to the cause of the crash, Ukrainian officials voiced suspicions that it was deliberately shot down by pro-Russian separatist forces in the east of the country. Ukraine had earlier claimed a Russian military plane shot down a Ukrainian jet fighter Wednesday night.

Anton Gerashchenko, adviser to Minister of Internal Affairs of Ukraine, said separatist rebels were using a surface-to-air missile provided to them by the Russians. “There is no limit to the cynicism of Putin and his terrorists!” he said, in a Russian language Facebook post.

Rebel groups said they did not have any weapons in their arsenal capable of hitting a plane at 33,000ft, Interfax reports, and suggested the Ukrainian military had shot down the plane.

Malaysia Airlines released a statement Thursday afternoon confirming it had lost contact with MH17 over Ukrainian airspace, approximately 30 miles from the Russia-Ukraine border. The FAA banned U.S. carriers from flying over eastern Ukraine and Crimea on April 25.

Flight tracking shows the plane’s last recorded location in Ukraine at 8:11 am, shortly after the Polish border. A source told Interfax that the Boeing 777 suddenly began declining 50km before entering Russian airspace and was found burning on the ground.

 

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 Graphic
Source: FlightAware

The White House said that President Obama spoke to Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday, who informed him of the crash. The Malaysian Prime Minister also made a statement on Twitter expressing shock at the crash:

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared in March, inspiring round-the-clock news coverage and an ongoing international hunt for the plane, which is believed to be in the Indian Ocean.

With reporting by Simon Shuster and Zeke J. Miller

TIME Transportation

Two Killed in Crash of WWII-Era Plane

The two-seater wrecked in Washington state

Two men were killed Wednesday when a small World War II-era airplane crashed in Washington state.

The two-seater aircraft crashed at about 3:30 p.m. in a wooded area after sputtering and flying low, a local station reported. The Federal Aviation Administration identified the plane was a North American AT-6C, King 5 News said.

The National Transportation Safety Board has reportedly been informed of the incident.

[King5 News]

TIME Aviation

California Air Show Cancelled After Pilot Dies in Crash

Pilot Eddie Andreini flies his Boeing Stearman over the crowd at Vandenberg Airforce Base, Calif., on Oct. 30, 2004, during the Western Air and Space Show.
Pilot Eddie Andreini flies his Boeing Stearman over the crowd at Vandenberg Airforce Base, Calif., on Oct. 30, 2004, during the Western Air and Space Show. Aaron Lambert—Santa Maria Times/AP

Eddie Andreini had been flying since he was a teenager, but he died at 77 years old on Sunday when his vintage plane crashed while upside-down in the midst an acrobatic maneuver during an air show at California's Travis Air Force Base

A vintage airplane crashed during an air show in California on Sunday, killing the septuagenarian pilot and causing officials to cancel the rest of the show.

Eddie Andreini, 77, was killed when his PT-17 biplane crashed during the “Thunder over Solano” Air Expo at about 2 p.m. on Sunday, Travis Air Force Base said on its website. A base spokesman told Reuters that Andreini was doing an acrobatic maneuver before the crash. It wasn’t immediately clear whether anyone else was on board.

Andreini had been flying since he was a teenager, and had been performing in air shows for the last 25 years, Col. David Mott told CNN. He also said the plane was upside down when it hit the ground.

TIME Airlines

Asiana Airlines Fined $500K After San Francisco Crash

Asiana Airlines Fined $500K After San Francisco Crash
In this July 6, 2013 aerial file photo, the wreckage of Asiana Flight 214 lies on the ground after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco. Marcio Jose Sanchez—AP

U.S. federal investigators say the South Korean airline failed to adequately assist families of the victims of Asiana 214, a flight that crashed on final approach to San Francisco's SFO airport on July 6, 2103 leaving 3 dead and 181 injured

Asiana Airlines has been fined $500,000 for failing to to provide adequate assistance to families of passengers on its airplane that crashed at San Francisco International airport last year.

The U.S. Department of Transportation announced the fine Tuesday after their investigation into the Asiana Flight 214 crash showed the South Korean airline was too slow to alert families of the crash, and did a poor job keeping them updated. The crash, which took place July 6, was caused by the airplane’s tail hitting a seawall while landing, and resulted in three deaths and dozens of injuries.

Federal investigators found it took the airline five days to reach family members of all 291 passengers, which was considered unacceptable since many of the passengers were from South Korea and China, and the airline was their family members’ only source of information. Asiana Airlines also failed to make people aware of a toll-free helpline, claimed the DoT, and the line initially sent callers to a reservation line. Investigators said there were also not enough translators made available during and after the crash.

An Asiana Airlines spokesperson told the Associated Press, “Asiana provided extensive support to the passengers and their families following the accident and will continue to do so.”

[AP]

TIME Algeria

Algerian Military Plane Crash Kills 102, Leaves 1 Survivor

Algeria Plane Crash
A man watches rescue workers working at the wreckage of Algerian military transport aircraft after it slammed into a mountain in the country’s rugged eastern region, Feb. 11, 2014. A civil defense official said 102 people on board were killed but one person managed to survive. The U.S.-built C-130 Hercules transport crashed about noon near the town of Ain Kercha, 50 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Constantine, the main city in eastern Algeria. Mohamed Ali—AP

The C-130 flight was reportedly carrying soldiers and their families when it went down in a mountainous area in bad weather, and all were feared dead for hours until Algerian authorities found a sole survivor among the wreckage

Updated: 11:30 a.m.

A military plane carrying members of the Algerian armed forces and their relatives crashed in the mountainous northeast of the country Tuesday, killing all but one of the 103 people aboard the flight, according to local reports. Rescue crews searching through the wreckage found a sole survivor hours after the crash, according to an Algerian civil defense commander.

The plane, believed to be a Hercules C-130, crashed in the mountainous Oum El Bouaghi province roughly 240 miles east of Algiers. A source told Ennahar radio there were no survivors, according to the BBC. The flight had been en route from Ouargla in southern Algeria to Constantine in the northeast, with 99 passengers and four crew members.

The army has not yet officially confirmed the crash.

[BBC]

This post has been updated to reflect the discovery of one survivor.

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