TIME Venezuela

Venezuela Marks First Anniversary Of Chavez’s Death

While President Nicolas Maduro struggles to live up to his legacy

Supporters of the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez took to the streets across the country Wednesday to commemorate the anniversary of his death from cancer.

A planned military parade in the capital city of Caracas was set to demonstrate current president Nicolas Maduro’s ability to mobilize the population, reports Reuters, as a series of violent anti-government protests continue to undermine his leadership.

Chavez was immensely popular among the poorest members of Venezuela’s population, thanks to his anti-American rhetoric and generous spending on slum projects. Yet barely a year after his death, his successor has faced a series of challenges from the protests, which have resulted in a reported 18 deaths. Maduro has been blamed for not doing enough to overcome many of the country’s problems, including rampant crime and spiraling living costs.

However, Chavez’s cousin Guillermo Frias claimed that although Chavez “changed Venezuela forever,” he insisted that “Maduro is also a poor man, like us. He’s handling things fine. Perhaps he just needs a stronger hand.”

[Reuters]

TIME Environment

These are 11 of the Oldest Things in the World

All that lives must die—but some organisms get a little more time on this Earth than others. For nearly a decade, the photographer Rachel Sussman has been traveling around the world, capturing images of the oldest continuously living things in the world, part of an effort to “step outside our quotidian experience of time and start to consider a deeper timescale,” as she put it in a TED talk in 2010. Everything she has photographed for the project is at least 2,000 years old, if not much, much older. That includes something as unimaginably ancient as the Posidonia sea grass meadow, found in protected waters in the Mediterranean Sea, which may be 100,000 years old, and something comparatively younger, like baobab trees found in southern Africa. It is a record of survival, of those organisms—and they’re all plants, lichen or coral, as the oldest animals live less than 200 years—that beat the odds of genetics and simply lasted.

Sussman has a new photo book out that details her project, along with a foreword by the science writer Carl Zimmer. There’s a sense of wonder imbued in these photographs of organisms that seem to be a physical record of time, but there’s also a call to action. Many of these subjects of Sussman’s portraits are under threat from habitat loss or climate change or simple human idiocy. (Sussman has written movingly about the loss of the 3,500 year-old Senator tree in Orlando, destroyed in a fire that was almost certainly set on purpose.) “The oldest living things in the world are a record and celebration of our past, a call to action in the present and a barometer of the future,” Sussman has said—and the images that follow prove her out.

TIME Asia

North and South Korean Families Reunite

South Koreans crossed the border to meet family members they had not seen since the 1950-53 Korean war. The reunion may have been the last chance for many to see their loved ones.

TIME olympics

These Are The Most Unusual Pictures From Sochi

Sometimes the Winter Olympics can look a little odd.

TIME Ukraine

Ukraine’s Protesters Face Violent Crackdown in Kiev

A new round of violence broke out in Kiev on Tuesday as antigovernment protesters clashed with police outside Ukraine's parliament and the nearby headquarters of President Viktor Yanukovych's ruling party.

A new round of violence broke out in Kiev on Tuesday as anti-government protesters clashed with police outside Ukraine’s parliament and the nearby headquarters of President Viktor Yanukovych’s ruling party. Opposition medics told AFP at least three protesters were killed and more than 150 were injured, including dozens of police officers. The body count has gone up to at least nine reported deaths. The flare-up comes about three months after demonstrations began when Yanukovych spurned a long-anticipated E.U. association deal in favor of closer ties with Russia. The opposition continues to demand a new government headed by its leaders and sweeping reforms that put Ukraine back on its path toward greater integration with the E.U.

TIME olympics

Awe-Inspiring Photos from Day 13 of the Sochi Olympics

Cross country skiing, hockey and more from the 13th day of the Olympics.

Cross country skiing, hockey and more from the 13th day of the Olympics.

TIME indonesia

Mount Kelud Erupts: Indonesia’s Most Populated Island Covered in Ash

The major eruption blanketed the island of Java in ash, forcing the evacuation of more than a hundred thousand people

TIME tribute

Remembrance: Leonard Knight’s Salvation Mountain

The famed folk artist died on Feb. 12.

Folk artist Leonard Knight, creator of Salvation Mountain, died on Monday afternoon in San Diego. He was 82.

It took Knight about three decades to paint and personalize the famed art installation in the desert of Niland, Calif., near the Salton Sea. Knight used adobe, straw and thousands of gallons of paint to personalize it with religious murals and technicolor Bible verses.

The site, which draws thousands of spectators every year, was Knight’s life project. Volunteers have been working to protect and maintain it since he was placed in a long-term care facility in late 2011.

Seattle-based photographer Aaron Huey met Knight seven years ago and returned to Salvation Mountain several times since then. He remembers the artist:

Leonard’s single mission in life was to spread the message that “God is Love” and though it references the Abrahamic “God,” his mountain truly transcended any individual faiths. He brought countless people together to marvel at both the mountain and his message. Living at the mountain full-time in the back of an old painted firetruck with no belongings beyond his clothes and a few coolers, he could be found surrounded by visitors every day of the week spreading his message of “Universal Love.” Though Leonard shrugged off the title of “artist,” his work—his single masterpiece—will surely be counted among the greatest pieces of folk art ever created.

I met Leonard seven years ago and his impact on my life has been immense. Leonard made me want to throw away all of my things. My computers, my phone, my career, my ego—and to help him build his mountain of mud and paint. Instead, I helped him carry a dozen hay bales up the mountain and promised to come back again. I returned a dozen times over six years to help him build, to photograph his work, and to try to better understand his humble genius. I had never met a man of such singular, unflinching vision and to this day I can say he is one of the most incredible people I have ever met in all the world.

Your message lives on, Leonard. Travel well my friend.

—Aaron Huey

TIME

Must-see images from Sochi Olympics: Day 6

Shaun White crashing out of the medals and more from day 6 of the Sochi Olympics.

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