TIME Interview

Vincent Musi: The Art of Photographing Animals

Vincent Musi has made portraits of animals his speciality

In all his years as a National Geographic photographer, Vincent Musi learned one simple thing: “You can’t tell an animal to do what you want it to do.”

“You have all these great plans for constructing a photograph and, in the end, you’re at the whim of something that you may or may not be able to communicate with in any way,” he tells TIME, ahead of the LOOK3 photo festival in Charlottesville, Va., where his work will be on show starting June 10. “In most cases, they are not at all happy with what you’re doing.”

For a long time, Musi photographed people and how they interact. He took to Route 66, documenting a monument of American history and how it’s experienced by its many aficionados, tourists and locals alike. He photographed the way of life in the Texas Hill Country, and the impact of hurricanes on people and landscapes in the United States. About a decade ago, he turned to animals, and that work is where he made his reputation—even though he still struggles every single time he’s faced with one of his subjects.

“It was very hard for me to learn how to do this, and I’m still learning,” he says. “Every time I do one of these, it’s radically different. You go in with very little confidence. And maybe the animals sense that.”

To connect with his subjects, Musi learned to talk to them. “I tell them what I’m doing,” he says. “I tell them who I am. And the people who own these animals often think I’m insane for talking to them like this, but I do. It’s a very collaborative relationship, in the end. You’re on their time schedule. It’s taught me a lot about communication.”

Musi’s collaboration with his subjects has also taught him humility. In its 127 years of existence, National Geographic magazine has built its reputation on photographs of animals, so there was a lot for him to live up to. “They have had the best of the best for all these years,” Musi says. “It’s intimidating. You have this animal that doesn’t necessarily want to cooperate or doesn’t understand what you’re doing, so you have to slow it down to get what you want to make these photographs.”

Slowing it down is also Musi’s approach when it comes to his second job in photography. For almost a decade, the photographer has been known as the voice of LOOK3. Each year, he’ll take to the stage of the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville’s historic city center to introduce the festival’s keynote speakers. His distinctive voice and sense of humor have become synonymous with the festival’s motto—Peace, Love and Photography—and laid-back approach to an industry that can move too quickly at times.

“It always comes from the perspective of the artist first,” says Musi, “which I think is lost in this sea of information in photography and technology. We’ve lost the point that photographers make these pictures.” So, when photographers such as Larry Fink or Michael “Nick” Nichols stroll on stage in front of hundreds of people, “they know they’re going to do something that they may have never done anywhere else and be treated like they’ve never been treated in any other place,” he says.

That purity is important, and that’s hard to sustain financially, Musi admits. “If we can’t do it our way, which is this laid-back, non-competitive thing, then there’s not really a point to doing it. So it’s very hard financially to keep it non-commercial,” he tells TIME. “We’re not selling anything. The sponsors are not telling us who to put on that stage and how to do it. They’re there because of what we do in the end. But it’s hard to keep that going. Every year I feel it’s that story of the little engine that could. I never know if we’re going to get there. We all want to get there, but you never know.”

So far, the festival has not failed to deliver. “We’re always amazed to how it turns out,” says Musi, “because the best planning cannot account for some of the wonderful serendipitous moments that happen.” This year, some of these moments will, without little doubt, come from Musi. When he walks on stage this Friday, it will be, for the first time, as a keynote speaker.

Vincent Musi‘s photographs will be on show in Charlottesville, Va. until June 28. The photographer will give a talk on June 12 during the LOOK3 photo festival, which runs from June 10 to 13.

Olivier Laurent is the editor of TIME LightBox. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @olivierclaurent

TIME Disease

How Dog Owners Can Keep Pets Safe From Canine Flu

Dog
Getty Images

Kennels can be hotbeds for the illness

An outbreak of dog flu in Chicago, Illinois continues to plague pet owners there, and new cases have been reported in as many as 10 other states.

Much like influenza in humans, symptoms of the dog flu H3N2 include runny noses, coughing and fever—and in some dogs, even pneumonia and death. The number of dogs affected is impossible to gauge since there’s no organized system for testing and reporting this kind of pet illness, says Edward Dubovi, PhD, professor of virology at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. There are likely many more than the 1,000 estimated cases in Chicago, he says, since many veterinarians stop sending in samples for testing after they’ve confirmed cases in the neighborhood.

Many of the states to which the virus has spread have seen only one confirmed case, often from a dog that recently visited Chicago. So while it’s not necessarily cause for major alarm, “that’s not to say there isn’t the possibility of independent introduction of this virus in other areas,” Dubovi says.

Humans are not at risk for the disease, but in areas like Illinois where the virus is most problematic, people can take steps to protect their pets from the flu.

Keep your dog out of close quarters. High-population areas like kennels, shelters and doggy daycare centers are hotbeds for the virus. And though we think about flu being a cold-weather disease, the warm weather may actually be part of the problem in this case, since vacationing dog owners often board their dogs in kennels. Dubovi says we need more information before drawing a definitive seasonal link, but just as a crowded plane can expose passengers to human flu, kennels can exposes pets to the virus. When possible, dog owners should try to avoid putting their pets in these cramped conditions in affected areas.

Put Fido on a leash. If dogs in your neighborhood are sick, make sure your pet isn’t able to come into physical contact with them, reports USA TODAY. Vaccination may be a good option, depending on your veterinarian’s advice.

If you’re a veterinarian, practice good hygiene. To protect against spreading the virus from one sick dog in the clinic to other healthy dogs, vets and their staff should be extra vigilant about maintaining clean hands, clothing and equipment. He also advises veterinarians to try to find out where the dog has recently been to help determine how the disease is spreading.

“Unfortunately with influenza virus, you can’t predict what it’s going to do,” Dubovi says. But as people become more cautious, “we may see an end to it,” he says.

TIME Cameras

Here’s a Camera That Lets Your Dog Take Pictures

Now Fido can snap pictures of things he likes

Nikon is putting out a new camera that allows dogs to take pictures of things they like. That’s right: Fido can now help you fill up your Instagram feed.

The camera is attached to your furry friend with a 3D printed case. It takes a picture when the dogs heart rate goes up, Quartz reports. As of now, the product is just a prototype, and Nikon did not comment on whether or not it plans to make the camera available for purchase. Nikon is calling the experiment “Heartography.”

MONEY Pets

5 Ways Fido Is Costing You a Fortune

golden retriever chewing shoe
Vikki Hart—Getty Images

You can't put a price on love -- but you can budget for unexpected pet expenses

A few months ago, I brought home a ridiculously energetic black lab mix from the local humane society. While the other dogs quietly waited by the desk to have their adoption papers stamped, my new doggie friend strained at the end of his leash, barking and howling and jumping as my partner dragged him to the car.

That’s the dog you picked?” an older man asked me with incredulity, as his dog sat stock still, panting at his side. What I’m getting at is that my dog — I call him Peanut — is quite a handful. But the joke’s on you if you pick out a pet and think being its owner will be a piece of cake. If you love your pet, you will rush him to the vet in the middle of the afternoon when he gets a swollen paw. You will make him special food when he has a tummy ache. You will spend countless hours walking and entertaining him. And, when he steals a cinnamon bun off the counter and then — out of fear of being caught — loses all control of his bowels and leaves a smelly mess in the basement, you will clean it up without being too mad. And, finally, when he needs something, you will pay for it with lots and lots of your hard-earned money.

Of course, when you bring a pet home, you probably assume that you’ll have to buy it a few basic things. Food. Some toys. Treats. A bed. According to the American Pet Products Association, Americans spent more than $55 billion on their pets in 2013. But for many pet owners, that’s just the beginning. Here are a few unexpected expenses to budget for.

1. Stuff You Said You’d Never Buy

I always assumed I’d be one of those pet owners with a stiff upper lip. I wouldn’t be spoiling my dog. Oh no. Not me. But suddenly, when you love your pet, you’ll probably find yourself rationalizing all kinds of (highly overpriced) pet paraphernalia. If you’re able to steer clear of the temptation while you’re picking up your standard pet food, more power to you. The line at my local pet shop (and my own experience) suggests that most people cave.

2. Less Dirty/Damaged Versions of Things You Already Have

Whether you have a cat or a goldfish, pets have a way of making a terrible mess of your house. So far, Peanut has destroyed: one running shoe, a picnic chair, a garden hose, a sprinkler, a dog bed, and a Persian rug. And, while replacing those things posed a significant expense, I actually think I’ve gotten off quite lucky. I mean, have you ever seen dog shaming? Or cat shaming? When you get a pet, expect to replace a few things. It’s a given.

3. Vet Bills — Big Ones

Perhaps before you had a pet, you thought you had limits. You thought if your pet required medical care to the tune of thousands of dollars, you’d decline. After all, it’s just a pet, right? And then you met Mr. Fluffypants, the pet extraordinaire who kept you company when you were sick. Or made you laugh. Or helped you through tough times. Chances are when it’s your pet, you’ll be willing to shell out just about anything to save its life. If that means emergency care, medication, or surgery, that can get very, very expensive. According to the American Pet Products Association, surgical vet visits cost dog owners $621 and cat owners $382 on average in 2013. If you have an accident-prone pet or are really worried about unexpected pet expenses, consider getting pet insurance.

4. Vacation Costs

While a winter vacation in Hawaii might be really relaxing for you, most pets don’t travel especially well. Airline travel is expensive for pets and can be very traumatizing and stressful. Plus, many hotels prefer that you leave your fluffy family members at home. When you get a pet, consider who will take care of it when you’re away — and how much that’ll cost you.

5. Your Time and Energy

If you have never owned a pet, you will drastically underestimate the amount of time caring for it will take out of your day. No matter what kind of pet you have, it’ll need some combination of exercise, training, entertainment, care, and clean-up. If you have a dog, you will (or should) invest plenty of time in working on obedience. (Otherwise, you’ll spend lots more time chasing after your dog and posting photos of half-eaten couches on dog-shaming sites.) And, just when you think you have things under control, your adorable fluffy will remind you just who exactly is in charge.

You can reduce some of the potential expenses you might incur by ensuring that your pet is vaccinated, gets all the required preventative care, and is well cared for on a daily basis. But no matter how healthy your pet appears to be, you should always be prepared for the unexpected. Animals are full of surprises. Fortunately, many of them are the kind that make your day, rather than empty your bank account.

More from Wise Bread:

TIME Healthcare

What You Should Know About Medical Marijuana for Pets

golden-retriever-lying-down
Getty Images

Be sure to consult your veterinarian first

Now that 23 states have given medical marijuana the green light (with even recreational use now allowed in another four states and Washington D.C.), growing weed has become a growing business. The newest frontier: getting Fido and Fluffy on board with the cannabis revolution.

Relax. We’re not talking about rolling doobies with your dog, or seeing “pretty colors” with your cat. Nope, these are cannabis-containing edible treats and capsules that are meant for sick or aging pets.

“The cannabis plant has many compounds in it,” Matthew J. Cote, brand manager at Auntie Dolores, a San Francisco Bay Area-based edibles manufacturer, told ABC News. Auntie Dolores launched its pet line Treatibles last year. “Most people grow cannabis for the euphoric experience of THC. But they’ve been overlooking cannabidiol—commonly known as CBD—which is non-psychoactive,” he said.

CBD, in fact, does not produce a high, and it’s true that it’s been studied as a potential treatment for epileptic seizures and pain relief for cancer patients.

So, as Cote explained to ABC News, the theory is that since aging canines share a lot of the same health problems as humans, there must be a market for pot-laced dog “medicine.” Sold online ($22 per bag of 40 treats, treatibles.com), Treatibles contain 40 milligrams of CBD per treat and makers advise giving one per 20 pounds of your pet’s weight.

“What we’ve seen is that some of these dogs respond very rapidly,” Cote told ABC News. “One woman from Fort Bragg was ready to put down her dog due to how sick and in pain he was, but the day before he was scheduled to go under, she administered our treats and just like that the dog was up, walking around, and acting normally again.”

Canna Companion, another pot-for-pets proprietor based in Sultan, Washington, also boasts of amazing results for customers. One such testimonial posted on their website reads: “It seems as though [Canna Companion] is the best kept secret in the animal world for pain management and anxiety issues. I originally ordered it for my cat Robbie for anxiety/inflamed bladder issues and it works! Robbie has had issues for the past year or so, and now they are all but gone.”

High (ahem) praise, indeed.

Even so, the American Veterinary Medical Association hasn’t taken an official stance, and even in states where marijuana is legal, veterinarians are not allowed to prescribe cannabis products to their patients. (Though that may change: In Nevada, where medical use for humans is legal, the legislature is currently debating a bill that would allow vets to prescribe it to pets.)

Producers of these treats and capsules also have to be careful about any claims they make about their products. According to ABC News, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration sent Canna Companion’s co-owner (and a veterinarian) Sarah Brandon a notice, stating that the capsules were an “unapproved new animal drug and your marketing of it violates the [Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic] Act.”

That kind of cautionary approach makes sense, say some experts, who point out that since these products aren’t regulated by the FDA, there’s no real way of knowing what you’re getting—or what the potential side effects might be. Says Tina Wismer, medical director of the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, in an interview with Health: “These products show potential, but there’s not a lot of research at this point. No one is even sure what the correct therapeutic dosage is. For example, in the ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ section on one of the websites, a customer asks, ‘How much should I give my pet?’ And they answer—I’m paraphrasing here: ‘Whatever you think would help.’ Well, that’s extremely vague.”

Not to mention, potentially dangerous: A 2012 study published in the Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care found that the number of dogs treated for marijuana overdoses at two Colorado veterinary hospitals quadrupled in five years following the legalization of medical marijuana in the state.

Sometimes it’s a case of owners deliberately administering cannabis products (hash-laced brownies, for example) to their pets, experts note. Other times, ingestion happens by accident—say, animals inhaling second-hand pot smoke or getting into their owner’s unattended stash. Wismer, who hasn’t heard of any problems with Treatibles or Canna Companion specifically, says she has fielded more than a few panicked calls at poison control about accidental exposures to pot in general—with sometimes scary results.

“You would think they’d become sedated and wobbly, but almost a quarter of them become quite agitated,” says Wismer. “They’re trying to pace. They’re panting. You reach out to pet them and they jerk their heads away.” In fact, Wismer adds, dogs that ingest large amounts of THC sometimes need to be put on fluids and have their heart rate monitored. Scary, right? (Although the commercial dog treats contain little or no THC, according the manufacturers.)

The bottom line here: You probably shouldn’t feed your pet cannabis—in any form—without talking to your vet.

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

More from Health.com:

TIME animals

Man Punches Bear in the Face to Protect His Chihuahua

"Boom, I hit him hard"

We normally like to think of our dogs protecting us, but in this case, a man went to extreme lengths to protect his canine companion: he punched a bear that was trying to eat his Chihuahua.

Carl Moore, 73, saw a black bear trying to crawl into his yard in Meadow Vista, Calif. and nab his little dog, the LA Times reports. Moore is a former boxer, and those fighting instincts kicked in. Moore punched the bear in the face and it ran away.

“The man or beast that I run from ain’t been born,” Moore said in the below interview with CBS Sacramento, “and its mama’s already dead.”

TIME animals

Sprinkles the 33-Pound Cat Is Looking to Slim Down

Sprinkles the cat is pictured at The Crooked Tail in Sea Isle City, N.J. on April 23, 2015.
Michael Ein—AP Sprinkles the cat is pictured at The Crooked Tail in Sea Isle City, N.J. on April 23, 2015.

"Whatever position she's in, she's stuck. She can barely move"

Sprinkles may have had too many kitty cupcakes in her life.

The people taking care of this sweet 33-lb. cat aren’t sure how she got so big, but they are looking to help her slim down, according to PressofAtlanticCity.com.

Sprinkles was discovered in a foreclosed home with ear mites, a flea infestation and an infection. She is now under the loving care of S.O.S. Sea Isle City Cats in New Jersey and is feeling better, but she still has some hurdles to overcome.

“Whatever position she’s in, she’s stuck. She can barely move,” said Stacy Jones Olandt, a volunteer at S.O.S. Sea Isle City Cats.

“We’ve seen fat cats at 20 to 25 lbs., but this is just obscene. Cats, by and large, don’t overfeed themselves. This is similar to a 600- or 700-lb. human that should weigh 180 lbs.,” she continued.

The 4-year-old kitty has trouble rolling over and grooming due to her extra weight, but the staff at shelter hope to get Sprinkles moving again soon. For the next several months, the kitty will be put on a closely monitored diet so she can lose weight at a healthy rate.

While there is a lot of Sprinkles to love, she also has a lot of love to give.

“She’s sweet, sweet, sweet,” said Olandt.

The staff at the shelter hope the feline’s affectionate personality will land her a forever home with an owner who’s willing to help the cat continue to slim down. If you’re interested in becoming that person, contact S.O.S. Sea Isle City Cats.

This article originally appeared on People.com.

TIME animals

Marijuana Treats for Dogs Are Now a Thing

A sticker is seen on a dog's back during
Yuri Cortez—AFP/Getty Images A sticker is seen on a dog's back during a demo in support of the legalization of marijuana in Mexico City on May 5, 2012.

Pet owners are using them to treat sickly animals or animals in pain

Medical marijuana has been known to help humans stave off the eye disease glaucoma, treat nausea induced by chemotherapy and ease the inflammation associated with arthritis.

But does the same go for dogs? Well, it just may.

Medical marijuana dispensaries have already begun concocting cannabis-laced treats for canines.

According to Quartz, the burgeoning pet-pot market is straddling a legal gray area. Enterprises hoping to market cannabis-derived products to animals are entering virgin territory in the absences of industry guidelines and sufficient scientific evidence.

However, that’s not stopping pet owners from giving their ailing animals edibles to ease chronic pain and illnesses.

Read more at Quartz

TIME Exercise/Fitness

17 Dos and Don’ts of Running With Your Dog

woman-running-with-dog
Getty Images

Working out together can help both you and your furry friend stay healthy and happy

Your dog may be the ultimate exercise partner. Think about it: dogs are always eager to spend more time with you, they have plenty of excess energy to burn, and temptation to skip a scheduled sweat session melts away when your furry friend stands at the front door, leash in mouth, ready to log a few miles with you.

Before you hit the pavement, though, you’ll need to train your pooch to run with you. Here’s how to make your run enjoyable and rewarding for both you and your best (furry) friend.

Do: Give it a try

Just like humans, dogs need daily exercise for their health and happiness. And again, just like humans, American pets have a pudge problem: an estimated 52% of dogs are overweight or obese. Walking or running with your dog on a leash is one way to get you both moving more. Not all dogs are cut out to log multiple miles at once (more on that later), but many can learn to be great running partners. “Even if you think your dog is too hyper or too poorly behaved to jog alongside you, he may just need some training and some time to get used to it,” says Angi Aramburu, owner of Go Fetch Run, a group exercise class for owners and their dogs in New York City.

Don’t: Assume your dog’s a runner

Before you hit the road, consider your dog’s health, build, and breed. Older pups may have joint problems that can slow them down or make running uncomfortable. Dogs with short legs may not be able to keep up with the pace you’d like to maintain, while larger breeds are prone to hip dysplasia, an abnormal formation of the hip socket that can lead to arthritis, says Arumburu. Then, if your furry friend is a chihuahua, bulldog, pug, or other snort-nosed, flat-faced breed (also known as brachycephalic), running may simply require too much exertion. Their squished faces are cute, but they tend to have narrowed nostrils and partially obstructed airways, which make breathing difficult when they work too hard.

Read more: 15 Best Dog Breeds for Active People

Do: Check in with your vet

If you aren’t sure whether your dog’s fit to run, check with your veterinarian. “A vet can let you know if there are any red flags, and can provide advice about what’s safe and healthy for your individual dog in your individual surroundings,” says Aramburu. Even if you’re certain your pup will be fine, give your vet a heads up. The doc may recommend dietary adjustments to go along with the uptick in exercise, for example.

Don’t: Start them too young

Running on hard surfaces can damage a puppy’s joints and bones that haven’t fully formed yet. “You really should wait until a young dog’s growth plates [areas of cartilage near the ends of bones] have started to close, and that time frame really varies by breed and size of dog,” says Sharon Wirant, an animal behaviorist with the ASPCA. “A much smaller dog like a Jack Russell Terrier could probably start going on regular runs earlier than a larger dog, like a Great Dane, whose growth plates will take longer to seal up,” she says. If your puppy is still growing or hasn’t started running with you yet, ask your vet about when it’s safe to start.

Do: Start out slow

“A sedentary person can’t just jump off the couch one day and run 5 miles, and neither can a sedentary dog,” says Aramburu. “Too much too soon increases your dog’s risk of injury, just as it would a human’s.” Find a beginner 5K training plan that will let you and your pooch progress at a safe, healthy pace. Many of these plans combine intervals of walking and jogging, so there’s plenty of time for active recovery and catching your breath.

Read more: 10 Rules for Raising a Healthy Dog

Don’t: Skip your warm up

Before you pick up your pace for any workout, be sure you’ve given yourself—and your dog—at least a few minutes of walking or slow jogging. “Warming up those muscles is a great idea for both you and your dog, and can protect you both against injuries” says Wirant. Another warm-up ritual to make a habit: giving your furball a chance to sniff around and do his business. That means fewer stops for pee and poop breaks once you get moving.

Do: Head for the trails

Running on dirt trails will be easier on your pup’s joins and paws than running on asphalt, says Aramburu. (The same goes for your own joints!) Plus, your dog will enjoy the natural sights, smells, and sounds—perhaps more so than the sidewalk in your neighborhood. Be sure to check at the park entrance or trailhead that dogs are allowed, either on- or off-leash. And before you let your dog off-leash, check into what types of wildlife roam the park. Deer and foxes can both seriously injure or even kill your beloved pet.

Don’t: Forget tick protection

Spending time outdoors with your dog—especially if you’re tackling the trail—may put you both at risk for picking up ticks along the way. Protect yourself by wearing bug spray and long socks, and check with your vet to be sure your pet is up-to-date on tick medication. Then, after any run through woods or long grass, inspect both yourself and your dog for ticks that may have hitched a ride home, and promptly remove any that you find. If you do realize your dog’s been bitten, call your vet for next steps.

Read more: 10 Rules for Raising a Healthy Dog

Do: Teach basic commands

A dog that misbehaves on walks probably isn’t ready to run, says Wirant. “You want to teach them to walk nicely on leash, and break the behaviors of stopping to sniff or marking every tree, or racing ahead and pulling you.”

It’s also important to teach a “Leave It” command, so that your dog will ignore or walk away from tempting items (like trash, roadkill, or sticks) they might come across on a path. Teaching them to “Sit” and “Stay” is also helpful, especially at traffic crossings. If you have trouble training your dog any of these commands, consider an obedience class or dog trainer.

Don’t: Let them pull you

Use a 4- to 6-foot leash; anything longer than that can spell trouble on the jogging path, since you want to train Fido to stay by your side. “Their nose should be even with your knee, and your arm should be straight down and holding their leash right by their collar, at least while they’re getting used to running with you,” says Aramburu. During the teaching stage, it can be helpful to maintain this position during walks as well. “Normally you want to give them more freedom while you’re walking, but it’s fine to keep them really close for a few minutes at a time and then praise them and let the leash out so they get a reward for being good.”

Do: Take water breaks

“Dogs can’t really tell us when they’re thirsty, so I tend to be over cautious with the water,” says Aramburu. She recommends stopping every 10 minutes, at least until you have an idea of how much water your dog needs—and especially in sunny or hot weather. You’ll want to carry a container that your dog can drink from, like a collapsible bowl or a bottle with a special spout for dogs. (And while we’re on the subject: Don’t share your Gatorade!)

Watch: 7 Easy Ways to Drink More Water

Don’t: Run when it’s too hot

Dogs overheat more easily than humans, since they have heavy fur coats and they don’t sweat. So it’s important to be careful when it’s warm out, and to avoid running in midday heat. Longhaired pooches may feel cooler in the summertime after a haircut—but don’t go too short, since that coat also protects against sunburn.

Run in the shade, when possible, and avoid hot blacktop, asphalt, or sand, which can burn dogs’ paws. To test a surface’s temperature, Banfield Pet Hospital recommends placing your hand or a bare foot on it for 10 seconds. If it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for your pet.

Do: Watch out for their paws

Check your dog’s paws when you get back from a run to make sure they haven’t suffered any cuts or injuries, says Winart. Take extra care in the heat, since their feet are susceptible to burns, and when you’re on the trail, where you’ll come across more rocks, sticks, and uneven terrain.

If you run in the snow, try to avoid roads that have been treated with salt, which can sting dogs’ feet—and then upset their stomachs if they lick their paws once they’re inside. Canine booties or disposable latex boots can shield paws from irritants; if your dog won’t tolerate them, you can also apply petroleum jelly or Musher’s Secret wax to their pads to provide some protection.

Don’t: Ignore warning signs

During and after your run, watch your dog for signs of heatstroke or overexertion, like lethargy, weakness, drooling and dark red gums, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, or panting to the point that he can’t catch his breath. If your dog stops and refuses to continue, don’t force him.

Any time your dog seems overheated, find shade and give him cool or air-temperature water; you may even want to dump some on his head or body. Just don’t let your dog gulp too much water during or after exercise. When they’re hot and thirsty, it is possible for dogs to drink too much, says Wirant, and suffer from potentially fatal water toxicity or from bloat, a dangerous condition in which they swallow a lot of air.

Read more: 14 Surprising Pet Poisoning Dangers

Do: Have a poop plan

As a dog owner you probably know better than to leave puppy poop behind, but still—it’s easy to forget to take waste bags with you when you head out for a run. Not only should you be prepared to pick up after your dog while you’re exercising, you should also know where you’re going to dispose of it, even if that means holding onto it until you find a trash can.

Giving your dog time to “go” before and after your run will reduce your chances of having to make a mid-workout pit stop. “With time, you can absolutely train your dog to urinate and defecate on demand by taking them to the place where they usually go and using a verbal cue,” says Wirant.

Don’t: Give treats too soon

When you finish a tough run and you’re still panting and sweating, you probably wouldn’t have a snack—you’d get sick to your stomach. Same goes for your dog, so hold off on treats until you’ve both calmed down a bit, says Wirant. (Watch out for ice cubes and ice water, too: The extreme temperature change could cause vomiting.) In the meantime, reward your dog by praising him, petting him, and giving him lots of attention. And before you head inside, let him have a few minutes to run around and explore, and to go to the bathroom once more.

Do: Have fun!

Once your dog has mastered the art of running on a leash, you’ll have yourself an always-willing, always-excited exercise partner. Just be sure your dog seems happy. A good sign: he wags his tail and barks when he sees you take out his running leash. Leave him home for a few sweat sessions if he seems stiff or uncomfortable after exercise.

In the long run, working out with your dog can keep unwanted pounds off, extend your life, and help you stay healthy and happy—and same goes for your furry friend. Keep it up!

This article originally appeared on Health.com.

TIME celebrities

Justin Bieber Introduces New Puppy on Instagram

The photo features a small black and brown dog cradled in his lap

Justin Bieber is recovering from his Comedy Central roast with a little puppy love.

The singer, 21, introduced his latest four-legged pal Sunday night on Instagram.

“Say hello to the newest member of the bieber family #Esther,” he wrote in the post, which features a photo of a small black and brown dog cradled in his lap.

Today is randomly national puppy day

A photo posted by Justin Bieber (@justinbieber) on

 

Speaking of laps, Bieber was recently spotted getting cuddly with model Ashley Moore at a basketball game, but it appears Esther is the only confirmed love in the star’s life right now.

This is Bieber’s first furry addition following the passing of his family dog Sammy in December. In a throwback Instagram post remembering Sammy, Bieber called the dog “the best puppy ever.”

R.i.p Sammy 😪😢😢 you were the best puppy ever

A photo posted by Justin Bieber (@justinbieber) on

 

This article originally appeared on People.com.

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com