TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: April 13

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Why do we need human pilots again?

By John Markoff in the New York Times

2. We thought education would unlock the potential of Arab women. We were half right.

By Maysa Jalbout at the Brookings Institution

3. Peru found a 1,000 year-old solution to its water crisis.

By Fred Pearce in New Scientist

4. Why Saudi Arabia might need to break the country in two to “win” its war in Yemen.

By Peter Salisbury in Vice

5. Startup accelerators are great…we think.

By Randall Kempner and Peter Roberts in the Wall Street Journal

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME viral

Watch Two Guys Appear to Get Tricked Into Catcalling Their Own Moms

Now, that is an awkward dinner conversation

A filmmaker in Peru seems to have come up with an ingenious solution to men sexually harassing women in the street — trick serial offenders into catcalling their own mothers.

Two moms are shown agreeing to be secretly filmed as they donned flattering disguises and strolled past their unwitting sons. After the men shout out sleazy comments, the women pull off their wigs and confront their red-faced boys with a very loud and very public rebuke.

One enraged mother is seen hitting her son over the head with her handbag.

The clip, created by American clothing brand Everlast, was filmed in Peru’s national capital Lima, where the company says 7 out of 10 women report being harassed in the street.

TIME Markets

This is Why Trees Come Down When the Gold Price Goes Up

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Getty Images

A new study establishes a connection between demand for gold and deforestation

The steep rise in the price of gold is a factor in the heightened rate of deforestation in South America, a new study has found.

The study, conducted by researchers from the University of Puerto Rico, says small-scale miners now find it profitable to try and extract the metal from low-grade seams underneath the region’s rain forests.

With the price of gold rising five times between 2001 and 2013, satellite data shows an area of 1,680 sq km cleared across forests in Brazil, Peru and the Guianas. Much of this was in protected areas, the Guardian reports.

During the second half of the period, deforestation doubled in speed as financial crises around the world caused the price of gold to shoot up.

Agriculture and logging are responsible for clearing more forest, but, researchers say, miners are more harmful to the soil and to water sources because of their use of mercury, cyanide and arsenic.

TIME

The Most Powerful Protest Photos of 2014

There wasn't a corner of the planet untouched by protest this year, from the tear-gassed streets of Ferguson to the student camps of Hong Kong

In 2011, TIME named the Protester as the Person of the Year, in recognition of the twin people-power earthquakes of the Arab Spring and Occupy Wall Street. TIME named the Ebola Fighters as the 2014 Person of the Year, but you could have forgiven if we went back to the Protester. There wasn’t a corner of the planet untouched by protest this year, from the tear-gassed streets of Ferguson, Missouri, to the squares of Mexico City, to the impromptu student camps of Hong Kong. Many of the protests were remarkably peaceful, like Occupy Hong Kong, which was galvanized by public anger over the overreaction of the city’s police. Others turned bloody, like the Euromaidan protests in Kiev, Ukraine, which eventually brought down the government of pro-Russian Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, in turn triggering a war that led to the annexation of Crimea by Russia, the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in May and the deaths of thousands of Ukrainians.

Not every protest was as effective as those that began the year in the cold of Kiev. Hong Kongers still don’t have full democratic rights, gay rights are on the retreat in much of east Africa and every day seems to bring news of another questionable police killing in the U.S. But the wave of social action that ended 2014 is unlikely to crest in 2015. The ubiquity of camera phones means no shortage of iconic photographs and videos from any protest, whether in Lima or Los Angeles, and social media gives everyone the means to broadcast. What follows are some of the most powerful images from the global streets in 2014.

TIME Peru

Peru to Charge Greenpeace Activists for Stunt at Ancient Nazca Drawings

Greenpeace activists stand next to massive letters delivering the message "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable," next to the hummingbird geoglyph in Nazca in Peru,, Dec. 8, 2014.
Rodrigo Abd—AP Greenpeace activists stand next to massive letters delivering the message "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable," next to the hummingbird geoglyph in Nazca in Peru,, Dec. 8, 2014.

Greenpeace activists allegedly left footprints near ancient Peruvian desert drawings

Peru is planning to criminally charge Greenpeace activists who are said to have damaged the world-renowned Nazca lines by leaving footprints in the desert nearby during a publicity stunt.

Peru’s culture ministry said that activists entered a “strictly prohibited” area beside the enormous figure of a hummingbird at the United Nations world heritage site in the country’s coastal desert, the Guardian reports. The Nazca figures, scratched on the surface of the ground between 1,500 and 2,000 years ago, depict creatures, plants and imaginary figures.

The Peruvian government says that it is trying to prevent the activists responsible from leaving the country while prosecutors file charges of attacking archaeological monuments.

“Peru has nothing against the message of Greenpeace. We are all concerned about climate change,” said Luis Jaime Castillo, the deputy culture minister. “But the means doesn’t justify the ends.”

A Greenpeace spokesman said that activists were “absolutely careful to protect the Nazca lines.”

[The Guardian]

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 10, 2014

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Kirsten Luce‘s work on vigilante justice in Guerrero, Mexico. The southern Mexican state has been in the news recently after the disappearance of 43 students, who were allegedly rounded up by police and killed by drug gangs. Guerrero is a poor region with the highest homicide rate in Mexico. In the worst areas, civilians have banded together to create self-defense groups called “autodefensas” to protect their communities from cartel related violence. One of the driving forces behind the autodefensas is the perceived lack of help from local, state and federal authorities. While not recent, Luce’s photographs from Ayutla de los Libres offer a compelling look at citizens taking the law into their own hands.

Kirsten Luce: Vigilante Justice in the Heart of Southern Mexico’s Drug War (The Washington Post In Sight)

Meridith Kohut: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru (The New York Times) These photographs show how a Peruvian vegetable, maca, and its growing demand is creating havoc in the farming communities.

Peter van Agtmael: The Art of Partying: Art Basel in Miami (MSNBC) The Magnum photographer looks at the party-happy art crowd in Miami.

TIME’s Best Photojournalism of 2014 (TIME LightBox) Collection of great photojournalism that has appeared in print and online during the past 12 months, by photographers such as James Nachtwey, Lynsey Addario, Yuri Kozyrev and others.

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: Fighters and Mourners of the Ukrainian Revolution (TED) Powerful TED talk by the British-Swedish photographer on her portraits from the Maidan square in Kiev.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 4, 2014

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Associated Press photographer Rodrigo Abd’s work on illegal gold mining in Peru. The pictures are from La Pampa, located in the country’s Madre de Dios region, where mining has turned vast areas of untouched rainforest into a scarred, bare, and poisoned wasteland. The government is now trying to tackle the issue, but as Abd’s stunning monochrome panoramic photographs show us, even if they manage to curb illegal gold mining and halt deforestation, wounds inflicted on the land may never heal.

Rodrigo Abd: Peru’s Rainforest Turns to Wasteland From Illegal Gold Mining (NBC News)

Tim Matsui: Lisa: The Legacy of Human Trafficking (MSNBC) Incredibly intimate look at a young West Coast woman’s battle to leave a life of sex work and addiction. | Related feature film: The Long Night.

Souvid Datta: Documenting Drug Addiction in Kabul (TIME LightBox) A look at Afghanistan’s heroin epidemic through addicts and law-enforcement.

AP Photos of the Year 2014 (The Associated Press Images)

Photographing the Moments Between War and Peace (The New York Times Lens) Another look at James Hill’s new book, Somewhere Between War and Peace.

In other news, the 2015 World Photo Photo Contest is now open for entries.

Photojournalism Links is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen, Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.

TIME the backstory

Photojournalism Daily: Nov. 28, 2014

Photojournalism Daily is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Jošt Franko‘s work on farmers in Gaza. Franko has been photographing a group of them in the Palestinian enclave since 2013. He returned this fall to gauge the toll of this past summer’s conflict. What he found is damaged homes, bulldozed farmlands and ruined olive trees. Franko’s pictures offer a compelling look at a community desperate to rebuild its livelihood in the wake of war.


Jošt Franko: Farmers in Gaza (The Washington Post In Sight)

Tanya Habjouqa: Occupied Pleasures (Slate Behold) Habjouqa’s World Press Photo Award winning series shows a side of Palestinian life that doesn’t usually make it into the news.

Rodrigo Abd: Peru Attacks Illegal Mining (The Associated Press Images) These photographs document the government’s battle against illegal mining in the country’s southeastern jungles, where 50,000 hectares of rainforest have been wiped-out in the last couple of years.

Bieke Depoorter: I Am About to Call It a Day (The New Yorker Photo Booth) Work from Depoorter’s road trip around the United States in 2010, has been collected into a new book called, I Am About to Call It a Day.

The Islamic State and Photography (Aperture Foundation Blog) Sam Powers considers the strategies and visual imagery of IS from a photographic standpoint.


Photojournalism Links is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen, Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.


TIME the backstory

Photojournalism Daily: Nov. 12, 2014

Photojournalism Daily is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Associated Press photographer Rodrigo Abd’s work documenting the legacy of Peru’s “dirty war.” Thousands went missing during the conflict, which lasted from the early 1980s to 2000; since 2006, authorities have unearthed more than 2,900 sets of remains from the 15,000 estimated to have been “disappeared.” Abd’s photographs show the emotional second burial of men who were slain in the remote Andean village of Huallhua, in Ayacucho state, in 1990. Their remains were recently exhumed and returned for a proper burial, giving families a sense of closure nearly a quarter-century after their deaths.


Rodrigo Abd: Peru’s Dirty War Victims (The Associated Press Images)

Denis Sinyakov: Moscow nightclub caters to women (CNN Photo) These photographs from a Moscow club show how its owners do their utmost to please female clientele.

The Images that Moved them Most: Photographers on America’s Veterans (TIME LightBox) Powerful collection of pictures and words from photographers who have covered America’s most recent wars.

Processing the News: Retouching in Photojournalism (American Photo) Scott Alexander continues the important debate surrounding the industry’s ethics of retouching.

War photography: what happens after the conflict? (The Telegraph) New show at London’s Tate Modern – Conflict, Time, Photography – looks at wars and battles through the visual representation of their aftermath. Tate Modern’s curator Simon Baker explains the thinking behind the exhibition.

The first photograph of a human being (Mashable) The fascinating story behind the “earliest known photograph to include a recognizable human form.”


Photojournalism Links is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen, Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.


TIME photography

Summer Solstice Celebrations Around the World

The day that marks the onset of summer is always cause for celebration—and every country observes it differently

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