MONEY

More Money Friday Roundup: Earthquake Insurance & Bank Contractions

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • The Chilean and Haitian earthquakes provided a powerful reminder of the devastation a tremor can cause. So why are 88% of insured homes in California not covered with an earthquake policy? Because the policies are really expensive. [Los Angeles Times]
  • Which states have jobs right now? Wyoming, Colorado and Louisiana, according to one analysis. But stay away from Michigan, Ohio and Missouri, where employment prospects are still bleak. Check out job growth prospects for all 50 states here. [The Daily Beast]
  • Banks have been building branches like crazy for the past few years, but they’re finally starting to slow the pace. This year, the total number of retail branches in the United States will decline for the first time since at least 2002. [The Wall Street Journal]

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MONEY

More Money Thursday Roundup: The Frugal Rich & Tax Breaks for Car Buyers

Personal finance from around the web:

  • Meanwhile, Chase is also sending out new cardmember agreements stating that “your account may be in default if any of the following applies: . . . we obtain information that causes us to believe that you may be unwilling or unable to pay your debts to us or to others on time.” That may not be the dreaded “universal default,” but it’s still pretty grim for the cardholder.[Credit Slips]

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MONEY

More Money Wednesday Roundup: Social Security Saviors & a Consumer Protection Setback

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • Banks 1, Consumers 0? Many in Washington are crying foul after this morning’s buzz about a bipartisan compromise in the Senate Committee on Banking which would nix a proposed independent consumer finance agency by incorporating it into the Fed. [Bloomberg]
  • Social Security saviors: your wife, sister-in-law and daughter could all be keeping this payout alive for the next generation. [Economix]
  • From pancakes and sausages to a Bahamanian cruise: You can get a lot of free stuff for showing up on your birthday, or by joining a company mailing list. [Generation X Finance]

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MONEY

More Money Monday Roundup: Warren Buffett & Defaulters Living Rent-Free

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • The Warren Buffett Channel: The Baron of Berkshire Hathaway was all over CNBC this morning talking about the economy, healthcare, Obama and earthquakes. Here’s your guide to the juicy bits. [The Big Picture]
  • Lenders are cutting back on forced evictions, thanks to an inventory glut and pressure to modify loans. “Lucky” defaulters are essentially living rent-free. [Lost Angeles Times]
  • This trick won’t tell you whether a given credit card number is attached to an actual account. But it can flag a number that’s definitely fake. [Five Cent Nickel]

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MONEY

More Money Thursday Roundup: What a Bad Credit Score Can Cost You & the Best (and Worst) Cities for Car Repair

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • Think your credit score doesn’t mean much? Think again. Over your lifetime, a poor one could cost you $200,000. [It’s Your Money]
  • If you live in Chicago and need your car fixed, good luck. You’ll need it. AutoMD.com sent mystery shoppers to car repair shops in 50 markets to rank which ones had the fairest quotes. The cities with the lowest rankings — based affordability, price variation and shop integrity — were Chicago, Honolulu and Albuquerque. On the bright side, Memphis was the best place to get a repair, followed by Jacksonville, Fla., and Omaha. [AutoMD.com]
  • Frustrated by foreclosure, one homeowner bulldozed his home to prevent the bank from seizing it. [CreditBloggers]
  • Reality show powerhouse American Idol isn’t just a riveting singing competition. You can learn some personal finance lessons from it, too. [BeingFrugal]

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MONEY

More Money Wednesday Roundup: Wealthiest Religions & Google’s Guide to Credit Cards

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • You’ve probably compared incomes using every other variable in the book. What about religion? Here’s the breakdown of finance by faith. See which religions are America’s most affluent. [Good]
  • Google is testing an online credit card comparison tool. But don’t get too excited. You can only be a trial run guinea pig if you live in the UK. [Pocket-lint]

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MONEY

More Money Monday Roundup: Job Expansion & Tax Tips for Gays

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • Two Bloom Boxes can power the average American home. What is a Bloom Box? A device, unveiled on 60 Minutes Sunday night previewed by Fortune Brainstorm Tech last Friday, that allegedly uses a new kind of fuel cell that is entirely self sufficient. [Huffington Post]
  • A new survey produced by the National Association for Business Economics forecasts job expansion and sustained growth in the next two years. [FOX Business]
  • If you’re funding a prepaid tuition plan, be on the lookout. Some institutions are trying to get out of their contracts because of funding shortfalls. [WalletPop]
  • It’s no secret that the tax code tends to favor married couples. Here’s how gay couples can minimize their obligations when filing their tax returns. [Bucks]
  • Back in November, MONEY highlighted some ways to increase your income. This opportunity may be knocking on your doorstep: The Census Bureau is still looking for surveyors. [ABC News]

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MONEY

More Money Friday Roundup: Capital One Reimburses Fees & Paying with Privacy

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • Social networking is free, right? One writer argues that we pay with privacy in order to enjoy the perks of sites like Gmail and Facebook. [Newsweek]
MONEY

More Money Wednesday Roundup: Tax-Prep Tips and Twitter Deals

    Personal finance from around the Web:
  • Economic (re)construction? Housing construction activity was up 21.1 percent last month from the previous year — and the most prolific it has been since July 2009. Could be a hopeful sign for a key pillar of the US economy. [The New York Times]
  • Twitter: the most bankable 140 characters around. There is an influx of tools for finding deals as they are posted on the social media service. Think of them as your tweet-tuned ears. [Wisebread]
  • Hiring a tax preparation professional may not be the best answer for your April 15th woes. Here are some tips for getting the most bang for your filing buck this year. [Smart Spending – MSN Money]
  • As if walking behind someone chattering on an invisible Bluetooth headset wasn’t bad enough: you may soon see people on the street rolling their eyes at no one in particular. They’re not trying to be rude, just raising or lowering the volume on their phone or music player. A Japanese company has developed headphones for cellular devices that use eye movements to cue functions. [Yahoo Finance]

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MONEY

More Money Friday Roundup: ETF Hazards & When Not to Tip

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • Exchange-traded funds are all the rage these days, but are they right for you? Here’s a primer on perks and pitfalls of ETFs. [USA Today]
  • If your teenager is more worried about the latest Twilight movie than her latest bank statement, she might need some credit guidance. Here are some tips to help your teen become credit savvy before the balances accumulate. [Wise Bread]

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