MONEY

More Money Monday Roundup: 10 Immediate Benefits of Healthcare Reform & Outrageous Traffic Tickets

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • You’re sick of reading about healthcare reform, of course. But now that it’s passed, check this list of ten immediate benefits for you and your family. [Crooks and Liars]
  • Forget about getting an early look at those Wall Street analysts’ reports: A US District Judge ruled Thursday in favor of complaints brought by several financial services firms against Theflyonthewall.com for publishing their investment recommendations before the firms could communicate them to their clients. [Yahoo News]
  • Proof that it is, in fact, not easy being green: Recent studies suggest that the eco-friendly consumer is more prone to “miserly” behaviors in other aspects of his life. [Green Inc.]
  • You’re not the only one feeling old at work. While to some it may be “just a number,” the EEOC reports a 17 percent increase in age-discrimination complaints made since the start of the recession. [Newsweek]

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MONEY

More Money Friday Roundup: Hospitals vs. Insurers & Bankers vs. New Regulator

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • Members of the American Bankers Association join the legions of lobbyists on Capitol Hill hoping to influence new financial regulations. Bankers are against the creation of a consumer financial protection regulator and want to remain exempt from state consumer laws. [The Washington Post]
  • Once you’ve said, “I do,” it’s time to split up the personal finance chores. Here are some tips for newlyweds on how to get your financial house in order. [Morningstar]

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MONEY

More Money Thursday Roundup: Dependable Toyotas & College Funding Strategies

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • Maybe those Toyotas aren’t so bad after all: J.D. Power and Associates ranked the Prius first in its compact car category for the 2010 Car Dependability Study, and its Tundra topped the list for pickups. [BizJournal]
  • Does a private, online meeting of your family and your financial adviser sound appealing? Blueleaf, an Internet start-up, is working to create a virtual “kitchen table” discussion space where users will be able to access all their account and investment information online and talk about it. [Innovation Economy]
  • Saving smart for your kid’s college education doesn’t necessarily mean mortgaging the house to finance four years of undergraduate education. Here’s how to be strategic in putting money aside based upon your tax bracket, child’s age, and expected income. [MSN Money]

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MONEY

More Money Wednesday Roundup: Copycat Defaults & Worst-Hit Cities

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • In the wake of the credit card law passed last May, understanding all the new regulations that apply to consumers has gotten confusing. A consumer-law professor tries to untangle the legal mumbo jumbo, offering advice in parts one and two. [Bucks]
  • Beer Market: Even St. Patrick’s Day won’t do much to boost lagging brew sales. Turns out Americans are more likely to celebrate the USA by buying a case on the 4th of July than they are when they honor the Irish saint. [CNBC]
  • Is there groupthink at work among “strategic” mortgage defaulters? Recent research shows that borrowers are more likely to walk away when they are underwater on their home if they know someone else who already did. [Los Angeles Times]
  • The Milwaukee Police Department has found itself combating a new hotbed of crime in the cities’ neighborhoods: foreclosed homes. The currently 1,200 vacant properties have become havens for drug dealers, so law enforcement is stepping in to educate residents on how to avoid losing their homes. [WalletPop]

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MONEY

More Money Monday Roundup: Homebuilders’ Stock & More Airplane Fees

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • Homerbuilders’ shares suggest that the housing market is ready to fly solo without the assistance of stimulus programs. [Bloomberg]
  • No free lunch…at 30,000 feet: Continental, the last major US airline to serve free in-flight meals, will begin charging for food in coach class on domestic flights. [The Wall Street Journal]
  • Another way to increase your income: Fiverr.com allows users to outsource random tasks for $5. [WalletPop]
  • The Federal Communication Commission will outline on Tuesday its National Broadband Plan to improve high-speed Internet access, providing connections in 100 million American households by 2020. [PC World]

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MONEY

More Money Friday Roundup: L.A. vs. The Banks & a la Carte Cable

Personal finance from around the Web:

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MONEY

More Money Thursday Roundup: Accidental Foreclosures & Free Cable TV

Personal finance from around the web:

  • A 46-year-old Pittsburgh woman is suing Bank of America for mistakenly repossessing her home and confiscating her prized pet parrot. The woman’s mortgage was up to date, but she says it took her a week to recover her beloved bird and six weeks to get BofA to clean up the mess it left. As foreclosures rise, mistakes like this become more frequent, experts say. [ABC News]
  • You can watch all the TV you want — without having to pay for cable. A little technical expertise and the Internet are all you need. [The New York Times]
  • Everybody knows how important it is to diversify your investments. But don’t stop there: Put some thought into diversifying your income. [Five Cent Nickel]

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MONEY

More Money Monday Roundup: $10 JetBlue Tickets & a Grade-Inflation Tax

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • College students are spending too much time drinking and having sex. The solution? A grade-inflation tax on colleges. [Center for College Affordability and Productivity]
  • Senator Chris Dodd will propose this week that the Fed should assume regulatory control over big banks ($100 billion in assets or more). [Daily Beast via Financial Times]
  • Happy 10th Anniversary JetBlue! Today only, you can book a $10 flight to any of the first 10 cities the airline offered service to from JFK when it launched back in 2000. [Baltimore Sun]
  • Amid all of the Oscar hype, how much is that statue actually worth? Based on current gold values, a melted-down Academy Award is worth around $500. [WalletPop]

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MONEY

More Money Friday Roundup: Earthquake Insurance & Bank Contractions

Personal finance from around the Web:

  • The Chilean and Haitian earthquakes provided a powerful reminder of the devastation a tremor can cause. So why are 88% of insured homes in California not covered with an earthquake policy? Because the policies are really expensive. [Los Angeles Times]
  • Which states have jobs right now? Wyoming, Colorado and Louisiana, according to one analysis. But stay away from Michigan, Ohio and Missouri, where employment prospects are still bleak. Check out job growth prospects for all 50 states here. [The Daily Beast]
  • Banks have been building branches like crazy for the past few years, but they’re finally starting to slow the pace. This year, the total number of retail branches in the United States will decline for the first time since at least 2002. [The Wall Street Journal]

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MONEY

More Money Thursday Roundup: The Frugal Rich & Tax Breaks for Car Buyers

Personal finance from around the web:

  • Meanwhile, Chase is also sending out new cardmember agreements stating that “your account may be in default if any of the following applies: . . . we obtain information that causes us to believe that you may be unwilling or unable to pay your debts to us or to others on time.” That may not be the dreaded “universal default,” but it’s still pretty grim for the cardholder.[Credit Slips]

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