TIME

Now You Too Can Be In the Celebrity Selfie From the Oscars

Just enable your computer's camera, and you're all set

At the Oscars last night, host Ellen DeGeneres managed to pack more than 10 celebrities into a single selfie. The Internet seemed to realize how impressive that was, because after Ellen posted it on Twitter, it became the most-retweeted tweet of all time.

Seriously, this selfie has everybody: obviously Ellen, and then also Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Meryl Streep, Kevin Spacey, Brad Pitt, Lupita Nyong’o, Julia Roberts, Angelina Jolie, Channing Tatum, and Jared Leto’s eye.

Feeling left out? We don’t blame you. Luckily, somebody created a handy little tool that allows you to put your own face into the photo. It activates your computer’s camera so you can pose accordingly, or you can upload an old photo. We tested it out, skeptical at first:

Screen Shot 2014-03-03 at 10.14.35 AM

But see? It looks totally authentic. Now everyone will think TIME reporters attended the Oscars:

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You can also put dogs in there, which clearly makes it even cooler:

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(h/t Business Insider)

TIME celebrities

Arby’s Bought Pharrell’s Weird Grammys Hat for $44,000

The 56th Annual GRAMMY Awards - Pre-GRAMMY Gala And Salute To Industry Icons Honoring  Lucian Grainge - Show
Pharrell Williams performs onstage during the 56th annual GRAMMY Awards Pre-GRAMMY Gala and Salute to Industry Icons honoring Lucian Grainge at The Beverly Hilton on January 25, 2014 in Beverly Hills, California. Frederick M. Brown—Getty Images

But which fast food chain will buy the black version he wore at the Oscars?

Arby’s bought the oversized brown fedora that Pharrell Williams wore at the Grammys for $44,000 on Sunday, just before he performed at the Oscars in a black version of the signature Vivienne Westwood hat.

The singer, who was nominated for an Oscar for Best Song with Despicable Me 2‘s infectious “Happy,” tweeted:

And the fast food chain responded:

The hat went viral after Pharrell’s Grammy appearance, spawning photoshop tributes and even its own Twitter parody account. Proceeds from the eBay auction will be donated to Pharrell’s nonprofit, From One Hand to AnOTHER, which provides learning and arts resources for underprivileged kids.

TIME Oscars

Who Is Adele Dazeem? Watch John Travolta Flub Idina Menzel’s Name

2014 G'Day USA Los Angeles Black Tie Gala
Actor John Travolta at the 2014 G'Day USA Los Angeles black tie gala at the JW Marriott Los Angeles at L.A. LIVE on January 11, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. Paul Archuleta—FilmMagic

Look who's talking nonsense

If you watched Sunday night’s Academy Awards ceremony and found yourself confused about who John Travolta was introducing to sing the Oscar-winning song “Let It Go,” you’re not alone. Apparently, even Travolta himself wasn’t sure.

Though it was Idina Menzel—who Travolta correctly, but weirdly, described as “wickedly talented”—who was singing the hit song from Frozen, the Pulp Fiction star introduced her as Adele Dazeem. (Adele Dazim? Adela Dazeem? We’re not even sure!) You can watch the flub on this Vine from Modern Family‘s Eric Stonestreet, below:

Luckily, Menzel didn’t let Travolta’s misstep rattle her, as she went on to turn out a “wickedly” amazing performance.

[BuzzFeed]

TIME Oscars

Benedict Cumberbatch is Lord of the Photobomb

Move over, 12 Years A Slave. This was the night's real Best Picture.

Benedict Cumberbatch would like to thank U2 for giving him such an incredible opportunity, and God for giving him the strength to reach for the stars. And the Academy, and his family. Bono, it’s been an honor working with you.

Actor Benedict Cumberbatch jumps behind U2 at the 86th Academy Awards in Hollywood
© Mike Blake / Reuters / REUTERS

Actor Benedict Cumberbatch jumps behind U2 at the 86th Academy Awards in Hollywood, California March 2, 2014.

TIME

Watch All the Best Moments from the Oscars in Four Minutes

From the Pizza Delivery to Lupita to Jared, these are the highlights

The quick and easy way to recap what everybody will be talking about. You’re welcome, America!

TIME Oscars

5 Reasons Why Twitter Was the Real Winner of the Academy Awards

And it didn't even get a golden statue.

The real winner of the 2014 Academy Awards didn’t get a shiny, golden statue. While we have yet to know how many people were watching the live broadcast, one thing’s for sure: whether they were in couture at the Dolby Theatre or in underwear on their living room couch, everyone was paying close attention to Twitter during the Oscars.

The social network was weaved throughout the ceremony. It was at the center of some of the show’s funniest moments and amused folks at home when things got slow in the 3.5 hour broadcast.

Here are 5 reasons why Twitter won the Oscars:

1. Host Ellen Degeneres turned tweeting into one of her main schticks throughout the show. And for better or worse, it provided some of the broadcast’s best parts. She was taking selfies from the first 15 minutes.

2. At one point, Degeneres decided to get the A+ listers in the front rows with her to take a selfie with her, explicitly to get a lot of retweets. Whether she was joking or not, the photo — featuring Jennifer Lawrence, Julia Roberts, Brad Pitt, half of Jared Leto’s face, and more — almost immediately became the most retweeted tweet of all time.

The photo trumped Obama’s “four more years” tweet after he won the 2012 election (retweeted almost 800,000 times) in minutes. And two hours later, it reached 2 million retweets, and counting.

3. Oscar online buzz got so crazy, that Twitter even broke down. “We crashed and broke Twitter. We have made history,” Degeneres said. “See, Meryl, what we did, you and I?”

4. Twitter lingo was even incorporated into Cate Blachett’s best actress acceptance speech. “Julia, hashtag suck it,” the Oscar winner said to competitor Julia Roberts.

5. Twitter also provided a necessary outlet to viewers who got bored during the 3.5 hour broadcast. Instead of changing the channel, people looked down to their second screen during inevitable slow bits.

TIME Oscars

Oscars 2014: 12 Years a Slave Wins The Night

Director Steve McQueen (C) accepts the Best Picture award for '12 Years a Slave' onstage during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on March 2, 2014 in Hollywood, California.
Director Steve McQueen (C) accepts the Best Picture award for '12 Years a Slave' onstage during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on March 2, 2014 in Hollywood, California. Kevin Winter—Getty Images

Director Steve McQueen's pre-Civil War era film about a free black man abducted in New York and sold into slavery in the south took home the Academy Awards' top honors, besting a category full of critically-acclaimed films

It didn’t come as a surprise when 12 Years a Slave took home Best Picture at the 86th Academy Awards — it was the favored pick for the biggest award of the night — but it was still a delight to see the cast and crew pile up on stage to accept the award.

Producer and co-star Brad Pitt took the mic first: “I know I speak for everyone standing behind me that it’s been an absolute privilege to work on Solomon [Northrup]’s story,” he said. “And we all get to stand up here tonight because of one man who brought us all together to tell that story, and that is the indomitable Mr. Steve McQueen.”

McQueen took over, first returning the gratitude to Pitt — “Without him, this film would not have been made,” he said — then going on to thank his industry cohorts, most of whom were female. “I have all women in my life,” he said. “They’re all the most powerful.”

If he seemed flustered, he recovered nicely in his final moments on stage — after a heartfelt message to everyone who has endured or continues to endure slavery, he turned around and quite literally jumped for joy. His jubilance was well-earned.

TIME Oscars

Oscars 2014: And the Award for Best Picture Goes To…

12 Years a Slave took home the biggest award of the night

It didn’t come as a surprise when 12 Years a Slave took home Best Picture at the 86th Academy Awards — it was the favored pick for the biggest award of the night — but it was still a delight to see the cast and crew pile up on stage to accept the award.

Producer and co-star Brad Pitt took the mic first: “I know I speak for everyone standing behind me that it’s been an absolute privilege to work on Solomon [Northrup]’s story,” he said. “And we all get to stand up here tonight because of one man who brought us all together to tell that story, and that is the indomitable Mr. Steve McQueen.”

McQueen took over, first returning the gratitude to Pitt — “Without him, this film would not have been made,” he said — then going on to thank his industry cohorts, most of whom were female. “I have all women in my life,” he said. “They’re all the most powerful.”

If he seemed flustered, he recovered nicely in his final moments on stage — after a heartfelt message to everyone who has endured or continues to endure slavery, he turned around and quite literally jumped for joy. His jubilance was well-earned.

TIME Oscars

Watch Pink Sing ‘Over the Rainbow’ at the Oscars

She took on the classic tune as part of a tribute to 'The Wizard of Oz'

Seventy-five years ago, Hollywood welcomed a very special movie: The Wizard of Oz. In honor of that milestone, the Oscars ceremony paid tribute its star, Judy Garland, by inviting her three children (Liza Minnelli, Lorna Luft and Joey Luft) to celebrate.

And the Academy also invited a non-relative to get involved: Pink.

(PHOTOS: Celebrities Walk the Oscars Red Carpet)

As the Los Angeles Times points out, the tribute wasn’t totally random. The theme of the broadcast (as viewers may have noticed from the evening’s multiple montages) was about heroism, and Dorothy Gale was counted among those ranks.

(PHOTOS: TIME’s Portraits of the Winning Actors from the 2014 Oscars)

Our vote for the real hero of the performance, however, goes to Pink’s gown. Over the rainbow? More like over the top.

(MORE: Rare Publicity Photos from The Wizard of Oz)

TIME Oscars

Explaining Matthew McConaughey’s Confounding Acceptance Speech

Matthew McConaughey accepts the Oscar for best actor for his role in "Dallas Buyers Club" at the 86th Academy Awards in Hollywood
Lucy Nicholson—Reuters

We parse it all for you — "Amen and Alright Alright Alright"

What exactly did he mean by all that?

After winning for his role as Ron Woodroof in Dallas Buyer’s Club, Matthew McConaughey launched into a semi-bizarre tale about his inner life. Here is what we learned:

1. He needs someone to look up to, something to look forward to and someone to chase.

2. He wants to thank God, who he looks up to. God is all about gratitude.

3. He wants to thank his family, who he looks forward to. His deceased father, he believes, is celebrating with a big pot of gumbo and a can of Miller Lite. His mother, still with us, taught him how to respect himself.

4. The person he chases is himself, 10 years into the future. He knows he will never catch up, but he wants to find out who that guy will turn out to be.

5. To all of that, he says “Amen,” “Alright, Alright, Alright” and “Keep on Livin’.”

(PHOTOS: TIME’s Portraits of the Winning Actors from the 2014 Oscars)

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