TIME movies

Mike Nichols: A Look Back at the Director’s Best Films

Director Mike Nichols.
Director Mike Nichols. Gerald Holubowicz—Polaris

The director passed away Nov. 20 at the age of 83

Director Mike Nichols passed away today at the age of 83. The revered director (and husband of Diane Sawyer) was best known for directing films like The Graduate and Working Girl and The Remains of the Day, which he also produced. He was a member of the select group of EGOT winners — those who have earned an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony Awards.

Nichols excelled at translating stage productions into sublime films, including Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, which earned him the Oscar for best director. He also staged the original theatrical productions of Barefoot in the Park, The Odd Couple and Spamalot, winning his eighth Tony Award a few years ago for his revival of Death of a Salesman.

In addition to the films he directed for the screen, he also directed some incredible features for television, including the mini-series Angels in America and Wit, which both earned Emmy Awards.

As a primer for newcomers or a walk down cinematic memory lane for those looking to honor the memory of a great director, here are eight of his best films:

The Graduate (1967)

Catch-22 (1970)

Biloxi Blues (1988)

Silkwood (1983)

Working Girl (1988)

Closer (2004)

The Birdcage (1996)

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)

TIME obituary

Co-Host of NPR’s ‘Car Talk’ Dies at 77

Tom Magliozzi;Ray Magliozzi
From Left: Ray Magliozzi and Tom Magliozzi car mechanics and radio talk show hosts for the show, Car Talk on WBUR-FM National Public Radio. Richard Howard—The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images

Known as one half of "Click and Clack the Tappet Brothers"

Tom Magliozzi, one of the hosts of NPR’s Car Talk, has died at 77 years old.

The radio host, known for his booming laughter, died from complications from Alzheimer’s disease, NPR reports.

Magliozzi and his brother, Ray, became famous public radio personalities as “Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers” on the weekly show Car Talk, which went national in 1987.

After graduating from MIT, where his brother also went, Magliozzi worked as an engineer, a college professor and a mechanic. He got into radio after a local station started putting together a panel of mechanics for a show. He was the only one who showed up but was such a hit that he was invited back (and brought his brother, who is twelve years his junior, with him).

Car Talk has been airing archived shows since 2012, when the brothers retired.

[NPR]

TIME remembrance

Oscar de la Renta’s Life in Photos

A look back at the life of the iconic fashion designer

Oscar de La Renta passed away Tuesday at the age of 82. Born in the Dominican Republic, the iconic fashion designer first became famous in the 1960s for dressing Jackie Kennedy, and since then has designed outfits for several First Ladies as well as the cream of Hollywood society. Take a look back at his life in pictures.

TIME Germany

Last Known Survivor of Hindenburg Flight Crew Dies at 92

Kubis Franz
Werner Franz, with fellow survivor Heinrich Kubis, a steward, in Lakehurst, N.J., on May 7, 1937 AP

Werner Franz jumped out of the flaming airship as it crashed to the ground

A German man thought to be the last surviving flight crew member of the Hindenburg airship that crashed 77 years ago has died at the age of 92.

Werner Franz suffered a heart attack on Aug. 13 in his hometown of Frankfurt, Germany, the Associated Press reports.

Franz was working as a cabin boy at the age of 14 when the Zeppelin caught fire and crashed into Lakehurst, N.J., on May 6, 1937, killing a total of 36. The incident has become one of the most iconic aircraft accidents in history, partly due to broadcast coverage of the disaster and Herbert Morrison famously crying out, “Oh, the humanity!” during his eyewitness report.

Franz jumped out of the aircraft as it was falling to the ground and escaped “without a scratch on him,” historian and friend John Provan said.

“Werner was most fortunate because he was in the officers’ mess cleaning up,” Provan told the AP. “Above him was a large tank of water that burst open and drenched him, which protected him a bit from the flames and the heat.”

Three other survivors of the crash are believed to be still alive, according to Navy Lakehurst Historical Society president Carl Jablonski: Werner Doehner and Horst Schirmer, both passengers, and Robert Buchanan, a member of the ground crew that had been waiting to secure the airship.

[AP]

TIME celebrity

Who Was Lauren Bacall? 5 Things to Know

Lauren Bacall
Sunset Boulevard / Corbis

The film star has died at age 89

Lauren Bacall, one of Hollywood’s most legendary leading ladies, died Tuesday at age 89. For those unfamiliar with the award-winning actress or her decades-spanning career, here is a quick crash course:

She got her start as a model: Before she made her cinematic breakthrough, Bacall was getting by as a model in New York City, where she snagged the cover of Harper’s Bazaar at the age of 19. Slim Hawks, the wife of To Have and Have Not director Howard Hawks, saw her on the cover and suggested her husband bring Bacall in for a screen test. Because obviously–look at that smolder.

She delivered this famous film line: In 1944′s To Have and Have Not, Bacall’s character tells Humphrey Bogart’s character, “You do know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve? You just put your lips together and blow.” The line is ranked on the American Film Institute’s list of top movie quotes, coming in at No. 34.

She had some famous romances: Bacall and Bogart began their relationship while filming To Have and Have Not. They wed in 1945 when she was 20 and he was 45, had two children and remained married until 1957, when Bogart died of cancer. After his death, she was briefly engaged to Frank Sinatra, but the singer broke it off — to her eventual relief. “Frank did me a great favor,” she told People magazine in 1979. “He saved me from the complete disaster our marriage would have been. But the truth is that he behaved like a complete sh-t. Still, that was over 20 years. When I run into him now, we give each other a nice hello.” Bacall later married actor Jason Robards, Jr., and with him had another child, Sam Robards, who also became an actor.

She’s known for the Lauren Bacall “Look”: “I used to tremble from nerves so badly that the only way I could hold my head steady was to lower my chin practically to my chest and look up at Bogie,” she told People about the origins of her trademark. “That was the beginning of the Look. I still get the shakes from time to time.”

She later became a theater star: Following her Hollywood success, Bacall eventually transitioned to a career on Broadway, where she won Tony Awards for roles in Applause and Woman of the Year. Despite the mark she left on movie history, Bacall never won an Oscar for her work, though she did receive an honorary award from the Academy in 2009.

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