TIME obituary

Outrage After Top Female Author Called ‘Overweight’ and ‘Plain’ in Obituary

Peter Carrette Archive Collection
Australian author Colleen McCullough in front of the Sydney Harbour Bridge on Aug. 31, 2000 in Sydney, Australia Peter Carrette Archive—Getty Images

Australian author Colleen McCullough, 77, did not receive the laurels she was due by one newspaper

Acclaimed Thorn Birds author Colleen McCullough, who died Wednesday at the age of 77, received a detailed obituary Thursday in the Australian newspaper, which chose to honor her passing by describing her as “plain of feature” and “certainly overweight.”

Despite penning the highest-selling novel in Australia’s history, McCullough’s obituary opened with disparaging remarks on her appearance. This prompted fans to vent fury via Twitter at the sexist characterization of the author’s life and grave oversight of her career accomplishments, including teaching at Yale Medical School and writing a novel selling over 30 million copies around the world.

TIME obituary

5-Term U.S. Representative John Myers Dead at 87

U.S. Representative John Myers served for 30 years in politics

(COVINGTON, Ind.) —Former U.S. Rep. John Myers, who represented western Indiana’s 7th District for three decades, has died.

Owner Robert Shelby of Shelby Funeral Home in Covington says the 87-year-old Myers died Tuesday morning in his home following a brief illness.

Myers was a lifelong Covington resident. The Republican served in U.S. House from 1967 to 1997.

Visitation will be held Friday at the Covington United Methodist Church, with the funeral at 2 p.m. Saturday at the church. Burial will follow in Mount Hope Cemetery.

TIME obituary

Shoe Designer Vince Camuto, Nine West Co-Founder, Dies at 78

2014 Father Of The Year Awards
Vince Camuto attends the 2014 Father Of The Year Awards at the New York Hilton on June 4, 2014 Slaven Vlasic—Getty Images

Camuto had been battling cancer

Legendary women’s footwear designer Vince Camuto, who co-founded shoe company Nine West Group, has died in Connecticut at age 78.

Camuto died Wednesday at his home in Greenwich, said Matthew Murphy, director of the Fred D. Knapp & Son Funeral Home, which is handling the arrangements. Camuto had been battling cancer.

The designer is best known for co-founding Nine West Group in 1978. He served as creative director there for two decades and was named CEO in 1993. Nine West was sold in 1999 to Jones Apparel Group.

Camuto founded the Camuto Group, which owns his namesake footwear line, in 2001. The company also licensed products for Tory Burch, BCBG and others.

The privately held company, based in Greenwich, did not respond to multiple calls and emails seeking comment on Thursday.

The designer, whose products are sold at the company’s own stores and other retailers, expanded his fashion empire to include clothing, accessories and fragrances.

TIME celebrities

La Dolce Vita Star Anita Ekberg Dies at 83

Anita Ekberg, the stunning actress who starred in Federico Fellini’s 1960 film La Dolce Vita, died Sunday morning at the age of 83.

The Swedish-Italian film icon died in Rocca di Papa, a small town southeast of Rome, due to complications from a longtime illness, the New York Times reported. Ekberg had recently been hospitalized.

Ekberg, known for her sensuality and beauty, rose to global fame after years of small film and TV roles and modeling when Fellini cast her as a Marilyn Monroe-type American actress who visits Rome, in 1960’s La Dolce Vita. The classic scene in which her character dances in Rome’s Trevi fountain before a thunderstruck Marcello Mastroianni soon became one of cinema’s most celebrated images.

Ekberg starred in over 40 films and won the 1956 Golden Globe for most promising newcomer — a now-defunct award category — which she shared with Victoria Shaw and Dana Wynter. That year, Ekberg starred alongside Audrey Hepburn and Henry Fonda in King Vidor’s War and Peace, following a small role in the film Blood Alley the year before.

[NYT]

TIME Music

Andrae Crouch, Legendary Gospel Figure, Dies at 72

Andrae Crouch At The Piano
Singer and composer Andrae Crouch plays the piano as he sings into a microphone in 1976 Michael Ochs Archives

Crouch wrote dozens of songs, including gospel favorites such as "The Blood Will Never Lose Its Power," ''My Tribute (To God Be the Glory)" and "Soon and Very Soon"

(LOS ANGELES) — Andrae Crouch, a legendary gospel performer, songwriter and choir director whose work graced songs by Michael Jackson and Madonna and movies such as “The Lion King,” has died. He was 72.

Crouch died Thursday afternoon at Northridge Hospital Medical Center, where he had been admitted Saturday after suffering a heart attack, said his publicist, Brian Mayes.

The Recording Academy, which awarded seven Grammys to Crouch during a career that spanned more than a half-century, said in a statement that he was “a remarkable musician and legendary figure” who was “fiercely devoted to evolving the sound of contemporary, urban gospel music.”

Crouch and his sister, Sandra Crouch, lived in the Pacoima area of Los Angeles, Mayes said. They were pastors at the New Christ Memorial Church in the Los Angeles suburb of San Fernando.

Born in San Francisco, Crouch wrote his first gospel tune at age 14.

Crouch wrote dozens of songs, including gospel favorites such as “The Blood Will Never Lose Its Power,” ”My Tribute (To God Be the Glory)” and “Soon and Very Soon,” which was sung at a public memorial to Jackson.

Debuting in 1960, Crouch helped pioneer the burgeoning “Jesus Music” movement from the late 1960s and ’70s that started the spread of contemporary Christian music.

His influence also crossed over into in pop music. Elvis Presley performed his song “I’ve Got Confidence” for a 1972 gospel album, and Paul Simon” recorded “Jesus Is the Answer” for a 1974 live album.

Crouch worked with many other stars, from Diana Ross to Ringo Starr, and his gospel albums sometimes featured performers from other musical genres. His 18th solo album, “The Journey,” released in 2011, featured Chaka Khan, Shelia E., Take 6, Kim Burrell and Marvin Winans.

Crouch was one of only a handful of gospel performers to have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

His choir, The Disciples, sang background for Madonna’s song “Like a Prayer.” Crouch helped Michael Jackson arrange the King of Pop’s 1987 hit song, “Man in the Mirror.”

He also arranged music for the 1985 film “The Color Purple” — which earned him an Academy Award nomination — and Disney’s “The Lion King” in 1994.

His success came despite a lifelong struggle with dyslexia. To create, he would make drawings that allowed him to grasp the concept. For the Jackson song, he drew a mirror with an image in it.

“I memorized everything through sight, the shape of the word,” Crouch told The Associated Press in 2011. “Some things that I write, you’ll see a page with cartoon pictures or a drawing of a car — like a Ford — or a flag. I still do it on an occasion when a word is strange to me.”

“So when I finish a song, I thank God for bringing me through,” he continued. “You have to press on and know your calling. That’s what I’ve been doing for all my life. I just went forward.”

Crouch said his dyslexia contributed to his success.

“If I was sharp in every area, I might be too big-headed or something,” he said.

Crouch had health issues in recent years, including diabetes and cancer. Last month, he was hospitalized for pneumonia and congestive heart failure and had to cancel a tour.

TIME Milestones

Bill Clinton Remembers Mario Cuomo

Mario Cuomo, who died Jan. 1 at 82
Mario Cuomo, who died Jan. 1 at 82, at a New York hotel in 1986. Arthur Grace—ZUMA PRESS

Mario Cuomo’s America was one of community, compassion and responsibility

Mario Cuomo’s life story–the proud son of immigrants who raised him to believe in faith, family and work and to use his own gifts to enter public service and reach the pinnacle of New York politics–will always be inspiring.

But it is especially important to us today because he believed that every American, native-born or immigrant, should have the same chance he’d had, and that that could only happen in a strong community with a compassionate, effective government.

He deplored winner-take-all economics and winner-take-all politics. He believed to the end that our country could give anyone the chance to rise without pushing others out or down, and that at its best, the essential role of government is to give everyone a fair chance to rise.

He never believed government could replace strong families and individual initiative. The beautiful family he and Matilda created and the lives their children have lived are more than enough proof of that.

He simply believed that without a “hand up” government, too many people would be left behind and our country would be diminished. Once an avid and able baseball player, Mario said in an interview for Ken Burns’ Baseball series, “You find your own good in the good of the whole. You find your own individual fulfillment in the success of the community.”

Everything Mario Cuomo did was part of his passionate determination to strengthen the bonds of community, from his early efforts to address AIDS, to his support for mentoring and health care programs for children who needed them, to his initiatives to create more economic opportunities in upstate New York. For him the struggle to solve particular problems was not interest-group politics but community building, making the weak links stronger.

He believed that he could do his part to build the “more perfect union” of our founders’ dreams. He did it with a politics like Lincoln’s–whom he so admired and wrote about–based on the better angels of our nature. He had a fine mind, competitive drive and unsurpassed eloquence. While he loved to debate, often fiercely, with reporters and opponents, he wanted his adversaries to have a fair chance to make their case.

That was never more clear than in 1993, when his thorny critic, the New York Post, hit hard times. As the Post graciously said on Jan. 1, “Mario Cuomo stepped in and heroically performed a one-man rescue mission … because he was convinced it was in New York’s best interests, not necessarily his own.”

As all the political world knows, I owe a great debt to Mario Cuomo–for declining to run for President in 1992, then electrifying our convention with his nomination speech for me. I later wanted to nominate him for the Supreme Court, but he declined. I think he loved his life in New York and was content to be our foremost citizen advocate for government’s essential role in building a strong American community, living and growing together.

In all the years since, Mario Cuomo never stopped believing that, in our hearts, Americans don’t want to be divided, driven by resentment and insecurity. He saw problems and setbacks as a part of the human condition, mountains to be climbed and opportunities to be seized–together.

Mario Cuomo’s America of community, compassion and responsibility will live as long as there are people who believe in it as strongly as he did, who define our success by the chances we give to others who have dreams and the determination to chase them.

In his keynote address to the 1984 Democratic Convention, Mario said, “We still believe in this nation’s future … It’s a story … I didn’t read in a book, or learn in a classroom. I saw it and lived it … Please, make this nation remember how futures are built.”

That memory is Mario Cuomo’s lasting gift to us.

Clinton is the 42nd President of the United States

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 7, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Adam Dean‘s work on opium poppy farming in the valleys of eastern Burma. The country, which used to be the world’s largest supplier of heroin until the 1980s, is experiencing a resurgence in cultivation. Conflict, corruption and poverty have driven an increasing number of farmers back to growing the plants’ opium sap, the key ingredient of the drug. The United Nations is trying to persuade them to switch their focus to other crops such as coffee, but it faces a difficult task: opium is far more profitable and an easier way for smalltime farmers to pad their incomes. Dean’s photographs offer a poignant glimpse to the boom that gives so many of Burma’s poor a hard fought livelihood, one that they know isn’t good for society but one that they aren’t eager to give up.

Adam Dean: Poppies Bloom Again in Myanmar (The New York Times)

Timothy Fadek: Rebuilding Haiti (Bloomberg Businessweek) These pictures take a different look at Haiti by showing how five years after the massive earthquake, businesses are working to rebuild the country

Muhammed Muheisen: Young Survivors of the Peshawar School Attack (TIME LightBox) Portraits and words of the students who survived

Glenna Gordon (BBC Radio 4 World at One) Gordon talks about photographing the clothes of missing Nigerian school girls.

Jane Bown obituary (The Guardian) The English photographer known for her portraits, died in December 2014 aged 89

TIME remembrance

Bess Myerson’s Original Victory

Miss America winner Bess Myerson
Miss America winner Bess Myerson Alfred Eisenstaedt—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

The 1945 Miss America winner has died at 90. She was one of the few in the competition's history to outlast the fame given by her crown

TIME once wrote of Bess Myerson that “few people have paraded before the public in quite as many guises.” Myerson — who, it was recently announced, died in December at age 90 — made headlines for a breathtaking number of reasons.

In the 1950s it was for TV appearances and a custody battle. In the 1970s, as New York City’s Commissioner of Consumer Affairs, when she campaigned against non-pure hamburger meat, advocated for honesty from retailers and supported Ed Koch’s run for mayor. In 1980 it was when she lost her run for Senate; in 1987 when she resigned her position as she faced charges of conspiracy, mail fraud, bribery and obstruction of justice (and, the next year, for shoplifting a few bottles of nail polish). In 1989, it was for being cleared of the conspiracy and bribery charges.

But it all started with Miss America. Myerson, who won the crown in 1945, was the first Jewish Miss America, and one of the few in the competition’s history to hold onto the spotlight for the rest of her life.

Here’s how TIME first reported on the news:

Atlantic City, once a mecca for giggling cuties in Mack Sennett bathing suits, abandoned itself for five days last week to a ponderous appraisal of the female mind. The occasion: the annual Miss America contest. The prize: a $5,000 college scholarship offered on a take-it-or-leave-it basis. The winner: Miss New York City, a Hunter College graduate named Bess Myerson, who excels at the flute and pianoforte.

The proceedings were conducted in an atmosphere reminiscent of a Southern female academy, vintage 1845. Super-chaperones shooed off men, warned each of the 40 contestants not to drink, smoke or chew gum. Stiffly genteel throughout, the chaperones simply ignored a man with field glasses who peered from a nearby sundeck into the solarium of the Senator Hotel when the girls assembled there (fully clothed). At one point the young ladies were inducted into a “sorority” called Mu Alpha Sigma, which was invented by the contest directors solely for Miss America entrants. Its motto: Modesty, Ambition, Success.

On the last two counts at least, Myerson proved worthy of belonging — and that was clear from the beginning. “It was obvious,” TIME wrote, “that the winner had deserved her victory.”

See the full story, here in the TIME Vault: Brains, Brains, Brains

TIME People

See Mario Cuomo’s Life in Pictures

The former three-term New York Governor died Thursday at the age of 82 , just hours after his son was inaugurated for a second term as New York governor.

TIME People

Watch the Best Moments of Mario Cuomo’s Famous 1984 Speech

"This nation is more ‘a tale of two cities’ than it is just a ‘shining city on a hill"

The late former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo’s most famous speech was his keynote address at the 1984 Democratic National Convention. It became famous for its criticism of the severe disparity between the rich and poor living in different parts of the U.S., with Cuomo mocking then President Ronald Reagan’s reference to America as a “shining city on a hill.”

“In this part of the city there are more poor than ever. More families in trouble, more and more people who need help but can’t find it,” Cuomo declared. “Mr. President, you ought to know that this nation is more ‘a tale of two cities’ than it is just a ‘shining city on a hill.”

Cuomo’s speech on equality was known for its attack on Reagan’s laissez-faire economic policies as much as it was for its defense of the poor.

“Maybe Mr. President if you asked a woman who had been denied the help she needed to feed her children because you said you needed the money for a tax break for a millionaire or for a missile we couldn’t afford to use,” he said to roaring applause.

Cuomo believed no one should be left behind in his “family of America,” saying that “at the heart of the matter we are bound one to another. That the problems of a retired school teacher in Duluth are our problems. That the future of the child in Buffalo is our future.”

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