TIME hockey

Toronto Maple Leafs Fire Head Coach Randy Carlyle

Randy Carlyle takes questions after the Toronto Maple Leafs lose to the Nashville Predators 9-2 on Nov. 18, 2014.
Randy Carlyle takes questions after the Toronto Maple Leafs lose to the Nashville Predators 9-2 on Nov. 18, 2014. Steve Russell—Toronto Star/Getty Images

Carlyle had been with the Maple Leafs for three full seasons since taking over late in the 2011-2012 season

The Toronto Maple Leafs have fired head coach Randy Carlyle, the team announced on Tuesday.

The Maple Leafs have lost seven of their last 10 games, dropping to fourth place in the Atlantic Division. They currently have a one-point lead on the Boston Bruins for the No. 8 seed in the Eastern Conference.

General manager David Nonis said the team couldn’t wait any longer to make a coaching change.

“I want to thank Randy for all of his hard work and dedication,” said Nonis. “It’s never an easy decision to make when changing your leadership but our team was not trending in the right direction and we felt an immediate change was necessary.”

Carlyle, 58, was in his third full season with the Maple Leafs since taking over late in the 2011-2012 season. He compiled a 91-78-19 record in Toronto. The Maple Leafs made the playoffs just once under Carlyle, losing in seven games to the Bruins in the first round of the 2013 playoffs.

Prior to taking over the Maple Leafs, Carlyle was head coach of the Anaheim Ducks from 2006 until 2011. The Ducks won the Stanley Cup in his first season at the helm.

Assistant coaches Peter Horachek and Steve Spott will lead the team during Wednesday’s game against the Washington Capitals.

This article originally appeared on SI.com

TIME Morning Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: December 17

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

Terror Threat Nixes The Interview

Some cinema chains are pulling Sony’s film The Interview from their lineups after hackers threatened a 9/11-style attack against theaters who screen the upcoming movie. Sony said it is going forward with plans to release the film, but would support theaters’ decisions

Starbucks CEO Talks Racism

Howard Schultz outlined his concern about the effects of racism and increasing social polarization in America in a letter to all Starbucks employees

Putin’s Influence Wanes

Russia’s worst economic crash since 1998 may force the Russian President to rethink his adventures abroad

Jeb Bush Eyes Run for Presidency

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush announced Tuesday that he will “actively explore” running for president in 2016. “I think we need to have candidates lift our spirits,” he said, one day before announcing his formal intention to explore a campaign

U.S. Will Bid to Host the Summer Olympics in 2024

The United States Olympics Committee (USOC) unanimously approved on Tuesday a U.S. bid to host the 2024 Summer Olympics and Paralympic Games. One of Boston,

Washington D.C., San Francisco and Los Angeles will be picked for the bid in 2015

Pakistan Mourns After Peshawar School Massacre

Pakistanis mourned collectively and individually on Wednesday after a brutal attack on a school in Peshawar by Taliban militants that claimed more than 140 lives, including 132 children. But questions remain over the military’s relationship with extremist groups

Angelina Jolie Hires Experts to Protect Her Kids Online

Angelina Jolie and her husband Brad Pitt, who don’t use social media, have hired a cyber-security team to monitor their children’s Internet usage and exposure. “We wouldn’t even know what to look for,” she said

Australia’s PM Demands Answers After Sydney Siege

Tony Abbott has said that everything from the nation’s gun laws to its national security policies are up for serious review after a troubled Iranian migrant on bail was able to evade watch lists, buy a firearm and take over a Sydney café, leading to three deaths

Clifford the Big Red Dog Creator Norman Bridwell Dies at 86

Author and illustrator Norman Bridwell died on Friday, Dec. 12, in Martha’s Vineyard at age 86. His publisher, Scholastic, announced the news Tuesday, but did not give a cause of death. Bridwell was best known for creating the Clifford the Big Red Dog book series

Bill Cosby Won’t Be Charged Over L.A. Molestation Claim

Los Angeles prosecutors on Tuesday declined to file any charges against Bill Cosby after a woman recently claimed the comedian molested her around 1974. The rejection of a child sexual abuse charge by prosecutors came roughly 10 days after Judy Huth met city police

NHL Teams Postpone Seasonal Hospital Visits

Several NHL teams are postponing their annual holiday visits to hospitals, amid a mumps outbreak within the league. At least 15 NHL players have so far come down in the outbreak, including for the Anaheim Ducks, Minnesota Wild, New Jersey Devils and New York Rangers

Poll: 57% of Americans Say Race Relations in U.S. Are Bad

A majority of Americans now say that race relations in the United States are bad, according to a new poll, which showed the most pessimistic assessment of racial issues in almost two decades

We will hold an #AskTIME subscriber Q&A this Friday, December 19, at 1 p.m., with TIME managing editor Nancy Gibbs, who recently selected The Ebola Fighters as TIME’s choice for Person of the Year 2014.

You can submit your questions beforehand on Twitter using the #AskTIME hashtag or in the comments of this post. We depend on smart, interesting questions from readers.

You will need to be a TIME subscriber to read the Q & A. ($30 a year or 8 cents a day for the magazine and all digital content.) Once you’re signed up, you can log in to the site with a username and password.

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TIME nhl

NHL Teams Are Postponing Hospital Visits Amid a Mumps Outbreak

An overall view of the interior of the arena at the NHL season opener at Staples Center on October 8, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.
An overall view of the interior of the arena at the NHL season opener at Staples Center on October 8, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. Stephen Dunn—Getty Images

'Tis the season for NHL players to get the mumps

NHL teams are postponing their annual holiday visits to hospitals, amid a mumps outbreak within the league.

Four teams have amended their plans as of Tuesday evening, out of concern that an undiagnosed player could bring the disease into a hospital, USA Today reports. At least 15 NHL players have so far come down with mumps, including players for the Anaheim Ducks, Minnesota Wild, New Jersey Devils, New York Rangers and Pittsburgh Penguins.

Though some teams said they would have to cancel their plans, others said they still expected to make their traditional hospital rounds, but after the holidays. The Calgary Flames, which has not had a mumps case, said all its players were vaccinated two weeks ago and they expected to make their visits sometime after the New Year.

[USA Today]

TIME Infectious Disease

NHL Mumps Outbreak Grows With Sidney Crosby Diagnosis

At least 13 NHL players and two referees were infected in the outbreak

Sidney Crosby became the latest National Hockey League player to receive a positive diagnosis for mumps in an unusual outbreak of the disease which is typically prevented by vaccination.

The Pittsburgh Penguins announced Crosby’s diagnosis Sunday and on Monday said that the two-time NHL MVP was no longer infectious.

“He probably could have been here today, but we took an extra day to be cautious,” said team manager Jim Rutherford. “As far as I know, he will return tomorrow or the next day.”

The mumps outbreak, which has infected at least 13 NHL players and two referees, is odd given that most U.S. residents receive a vaccine for the disease, which causes headache, fever and swelling of the salivary glands. Crosby reportedly received a vaccination for the disease as recently as this February, according to the Penguins.

Still, doctors say that the effectiveness of the vaccine can wear off over time, and hockey players may be particularly susceptible to the disease given the exchange of saliva during heavy hits.

MONEY

Surprising Lessons from the Latest Superstar Athlete to Go Broke

Columbus Blue Jackets defenseman Jack Johnson (7) during the NHL game between the Boston Bruins and the Columbus Blue Jackets at Nationwide Arena in Columbus, OH. The Boston Bruins defeated the Columbus Blue Jackets 4-3 in a shootout.
Aaron Doster—Cal Sport Media via AP Images

In Jonathan Rosen’s 1997 novel Eve’s Apple, a character describes her mother as someone who wanted to “have her kids and eat them, too.”

It’s hard not think of such parental malevolence when considering the recent bankruptcy filing of Columbus Blue Jackets defenseman Jack Johnson, whose financial woes were caused almost entirely by the financial evildoings of his parents. But despite the extreme nature of this case—and because of the surprising frequency of money troubles for professional athletes—there are two valuable lessons in Johnson’s travails that are relevant to sports fans and the rest of finance-fogged America.

Lesson 1: We should start teaching personal finance in kindergarten.

Despite a tremendous increase over the past 30 years in the number of reliable sources offering solid financial advice instruction to anyone who cares to learn—from Money magazine to motleyfool.com to most reputable financial services companies—most Americans are woefully ignorant when it comes to basic principles of money management. As a country, we just don’t know enough about borrowing, saving, investing and insurance. And while some some states are being taken to address this problem, we’re only at the early stages of what will be a very long process.

Don’t believe me? Check out the four main recommendations of the President’s Advisory Council of Financial Capability—all of them smart—and tell me how close you think we are to solving the problem. Every school, in every state, needs to incorporate financial literacy into curriculums from the earliest stages, i.e., from the time kids learn their ABCs and numbers. The only way to overcome the inherent tedium of personal finance—a topic about as exciting as someone else’s golf score—is to make it less of a “subject” and more of a tool. I’ve been writing about personal finance, on and off, for nearly a quarter of a century and the only way to successfully educate all but the biggest money nerds is to make zucchini bread. That is, we have to hide the good-for-you-but-unappealing-stuff (apologies to zucchini farmers) in more exciting fare.

Lesson 2: Professional athletes are particular vulnerable to being ripped off.

When we look at professional athletes we see (or imagine) any number of positive qualities: talent, discipline, focus, commitment, bravery. But while most of those traits exist to greater and lesser extent in all sports stars, the one quality that must be present is what insiders call “coachability.” For every athlete MLB, NBA, NFL or NHL athlete there were dozens of others with similar skills who weren’t able to make it to the big leagues because they wouldn’t or couldn’t follow directions. I worked at ESPN for 14 years and I was struck by nothing so much as the willingness of otherwise supremely confident and self-directed men and women to listen to their coaches, trainers and managers. For good reason, too: These authority figures possess expertise that athletes respect and desire, a treasury of knowledge and experience from which they hope to achieve success and extend their careers.

Accurate, real-time salaries for thousands of careers.

The problem with this malleability is that it often applies to experts in fields outside their core sport—such as health, nutrition or fitness—but especially comes into play with complex or arcane subjects like finance. Once an athlete trusts a financial adviser, heaven help him or her if said adviser is up to no good or even simply incompetent. (Heaven help all of us if it’s a parent who’s doing the exploiting.) Most of the major sports leagues and players’ unions recognize this and try to provide guidance, protection and warning to their athetes, but they could and should do better. I write this knowing how difficult such a challenge is, not just because athletes work as hard and as long as they do to earn their rich salaries but also because they are, generally, young and cavalier about risks of all kinds. Such is youth.

If I were King of The Sports World—a development unlikely to occur any time in the near future—I would require that a majority of every pro athlete’s earnings be directed to some kind of TIAA-CREF type organization that would safeguard their fortunes until they are through with their careers. Such an arrangement might not be popular (or legal or practical) but it would ensure that far fewer pro stars are fleeced because they haven’t been taught well to handle their money and have been taught too well to follow orders.

Oh, yeah, one other rule in my hypothetical sports realm: Even after athletes retire, I wouldn’t give them control of their money until they’ve taken a few financial literacy courses.

TIME nhl

Jack Johnson’s Shocking Bankruptcy Story; Maple Leafs Point Fingers

Columbus Blue Jackets defenseman Jack Johnson (7) during the game between the New Jersey Devils and the Columbus Blue Jackets played at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J. on Nov. 1, 2014.
Columbus Blue Jackets defenseman Jack Johnson (7) during the game between the New Jersey Devils and the Columbus Blue Jackets played at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J. on Nov. 1, 2014. Rich Graessle—AP

Johnson, currently playing the fourth season of a seven-year, $30 million deal, has less than $50,000 in assets and more than $10 million in debt

The hockey world has been taught a couple of vitally important lessons this week.

From Ottawa Senators GM Bryan Murray, who is suffering from terminal cancer, we’ve learned of the life-saving potential of colonoscopies. It’s an uncomfortable thought, especially for men who tend to shrug off medical care for anything short of limb reattachment, but the preventative value of this simple procedure is enormous.

And then we learned that if you make your living in this game, you need to get yourself a good agent. It’s advice that would have saved Jack Johnson from bankruptcy.

The story of the financial ruination of the Columbus Blue Jackets defenseman that was told this morning by Dispatch writer Aaron Portzline is both shocking and heartbreaking. Johnson, currently playing the fourth season of a seven-year, $30 million deal, has less than $50,000 in assets and more than $10 million in debt, the result, Johnson says, of “picking the wrong people who led me down the wrong path.”

Those people, according to Portzline, were Johnson’s own parents.

Earlier in his career Johnson had Pat Brisson, one of the best agents in the game, looking after his affairs. But the two parted ways in 2008 and Johnson signed a power of attorney that turned over full control of his finances to his mother, Tina Johnson.

In hindsight, the decision to put millions of dollars into inexperienced hands was incredibly naive. But these were his parents. The two people in the world he trusted the most. Put into the same situation, there are plenty of us who might have done the same thing.

Fortunately, most of us don’t have parents like Johnson’s. The picture of them that’s painted by Portzline’s research is beyond ugly. Instead of making safe, conventional investments that would protect the financial future of their son, the pair blew through past and future earnings via a complicated series of risky loans at high interest rates, defaults on which resulted in massive fees, higher interest rates and three lawsuits against Johnson.

There are also reports of lavish spending on houses and travel, leaving Johnson not just broke but essentially working for nothing as garnishments swallowed his massive bi-monthly paychecks.

“I’ve seen lots of instances of parents riding their kid’s coattails around,” a league source told Portzline. “I’ve never seen a case as ugly as this one, where the parents took such advantage of their kid.”

Johnson has since surrounded himself with competent attorneys and financial experts who actually have his best interests in mind. Assuming relief will be provided in bankruptcy, he has a chance to climb out of this hole, save his future and maybe put his focus back on playing hockey.

But his relationship with his parents? That’s a tragic casualty of this mess. And one that no court can piece back together.

This article originally appeared on SI.com

TIME Food & Drink

The 5 Best NHL Arenas for Food

An overall view of the interior of the arena at the NHL season opener at Staples Center on October 8, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.
An overall view of the interior of the arena at the NHL season opener at Staples Center on October 8, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. Stephen Dunn—Getty Images

Here are the best places in the NHL to pound on the glass and have a bite to eat

This article originally appeared on Food & Wine.

It’s hockey season. Oh you didn’t know? That’s because hockey is usually degraded as the least major of the major American sports. Heck, at this point Nascar and professional wrestling get more love than hockey. But we find that exceedingly unfair. Hockey is faster than football, takes as much skill as baseball and has at least as many missing teeth as professional wrestling. NHL arenas also offer some great food for hungry fans. Here are the best places in the NHL to pound on the glass and have a bite to eat.

1. Bridgestone Arena, Home of the Nashville Predators

There’s not much in the way of actual ice and snow in Nashville, but the city still scored a hockey team in 1998. Predators’ fans can eat what is most likely the best if not the only chicken-and-waffles in all of professional sports. And the Nashville Hot Chicken sandwich is another local pick that’s worth the wait.

2. Rogers Arena, Home of the Vancouver Canucks

This year the Canucks have introduced lobster rolls and a dozen variations on stadium tube steaks, including a “perogy dog” topped with cheese and potato perogies and sauerkraut and a croque monsieur dog topped with ham and gruyere. They’ll also pour you a Negroni right from a concession stand. Not a bad way alternative to the $8 swill beer most arenas offer.

3. The Staples Center, Home of the L.A. Kings

Nachos and hot dogs are available, but a lot of the menu options at the home of the defending Stanley Cup champions read fit L.A.’s health conscious stereotype: roasted beet salad, sesame-crusted tuna, even gluten-free beer. The big winner here though is the sushi that’s made fresh at every game.

4. Nationwide Arena, Home of the Columbus Blue Jackets

Columbus, Ohio is on this list for one reason and it ain’t fancy. The arena here serves the ultimate “drunk at the stadium” food. The Dancing Kevin sandwich is named after this guy, Dancing Kevin. And like him it is a fantastically oversized piece of work. A pork bomb on a pretzel bun, the sandwich features ham, pulled pork and bacon topped with mozzarella sticks.

5. Bell Centre, Home of the Montreal Canadians;

Montreal takes a few things very seriously: French, food and hockey. The latter two are on display at the Bell Centre, which sells smoked meat sandwiches from Lesters Deli, which has been cranking out delicious, fatty sandwiches in Montreal for over 60 years. And because this is Canada, expect mountains of poutine.

More from Food & Wine:

TIME

Why Wayne Gretzky Is Still ‘The Great One’

Simply the Best
The March 18, 1985, cover of TIME TIME

Wayne Gretzky became the all-time NHL career scoring leader on Oct. 15, 1989

Correction appended, Oct. 15, 2014, 1:45 pm

If you grew up in a hockey house like I did, your parents might’ve worshipped Wayne Gretzky as if he were the Messiah on Skates. And in a lot of ways he was: The Great One played a full two decades of NHL-level hockey, starting in 1979 with the Edmonton Oilers and ending with my hometown heroes, the New York Rangers, just before the turn of the century, racking up some 2,857 points in 1,487 regular season games. (NHL scoring gives individual players one point for a goal and one point for an assist, but those numbers don’t mean squat for the game at hand.)

Those 2,857 points made him — and still makes him — the League’s leading scorer. Gretzky toppled another hockey legend, Gordie Howe (1,850 points), to first take that title on Oct. 15, 1989, 25 years ago Wednesday.

Gretzky’s points total is impressive to say the absolute least. But as a kid who grew up loving hockey in Gretzky’s twilight years, it’s really this stat that stuck in my mind: If you take 2,857 points and subtract the points he got for goals, he’s still got more assists than any other NHL player has total points. (The next guy down, point-wise? Gretzky teammate and Rangers legend Mark Messier.)

As a young hockey fan, that fact instilled a simple lesson: Greatness can sometimes come from being the guy who puts the puck in the back of the net. But even more often, it comes from knowing whom you can count on to help you get that job done even better than you can. “How long Gretzky and [NBA star Larry] Bird play at the top and stay at the fair will help determine their ultimate reputations,” TIME wrote of Gretzky in a March 18, 1985 cover story about athletes at the peaks of their careers.

Gretzky stayed at the top for many seasons after that, but 25 years later his ultimate reputation is this: A life lesson that, while being the hero is nice, you don’t always have to shoot — sometimes it’s smarter to pass.

Read a 1981 story about the then-20-year-old hockey star, here in TIME’s archives: Hockey’s Great Gretzky

Correction: The original version of this story misstated the number of individual points an NHL player gets for a goal. The number is one.

MONEY

Why Germany Is So Good At Soccer (and the U.S. Is So Mediocre) in 2 Charts

Germany's national soccer players Roman Weidenfeller, Shkodran Mustafi, Andre Schuerrle , Kevin Grosskreutz and Per Mertesacker celebrate
Kai Pfaffenbach—Reuters

Hint: It's Focus.

As Germany takes the pitch Sunday, fresh off crushing Brazil’s World Cup hopes in a historic 7-1 blowout, it’s worth reflecting how Germany got there. Not the team; the country.

See, this isn’t Germany’s first grab at the sport’s brass ring.The German national team is one of international soccer’s most consistent powerhouses. German teams—including those from the Nazi era, post-war West Germany, and reunified Germany—have qualified for 18 of 20 World Cup tournaments and missed the quarter finals of those only once. The team has also made it to a mind-blowing seven finals — a 35% appearance rate — winning three of them.

On the other side of the Atlantic, the United States has not exactly replicated Deutschland’s success. The U.S. has zero titles and zero finals appearances, and reached the semi-finals only once, at the first World Cup in 1930. This year, we were eliminated by Belgium in the round of 16, and finished 15th overall in the tournament. Not bad by our standards, but not great. And certainly not befitting of a country with the world’s largest economy, 300 million people, and an extremely competitive national team in almost every other team sport.

So why is Germany is so good and the U.S. so mediocre? Following America’s most recent loss, many theories have been offered. We over-coach our players; our college system doesn’t mirror international play; we don’t have a soccer “culture.” There’s likely some truth to all of these answers, but there’s one I find most convincing: competition from other sports. The U.S. has only so much athletic talent, and unlike many other nations, we tend to spread it around. Germany, on the other hand, concentrates the vast majority of its athletic talent on soccer—and they’ve certainly reaped the rewards.

In order to visualize this, I’ve assembled pie charts showing the revenue breakdown of the most popular professional sports leagues. The numbers aren’t perfectly analogous—updated figures on smaller German team sports are hard to come by, sports seasons don’t coincide and sometimes span more than one calendar year, and we’re including only major team sports. But as a rough proxy for each nation’s athletic focus, they are offer a clear picture of the sports the two nations care most about and to which they dedicate the most resources and, as economists and others would argue, talent.

In the two charts below, the green pie slice represents the percentage of major team sports revenue that goes to soccer. As you can see, it’s not even close.

GermanySportsRevNew

 

USSportsRev

Soccer eats up the overwhelming majority of German team sports revenue, while in the US, it barely makes up a sliver. Germany’s three major soccer leagues each take in over €100 million, and their combined revenue is €2.8 billion—the equivalent of over $3.8 billion. There’s really only one major sport in Germany, with a few second-tier leagues running far behind.

In comparison, America’s MLS teams have a combined revenue of about $494 million, as estimated by Forbes in 2013 (the MLS does not release total revenue figures). That’s about 1/7th of the NHL’s revenue, and 1/20th of the NFL’s total income.

So next time you’re wondering why the U.S. isn’t good at soccer, remember: the American people are not exactly focussed on the “beautiful game.” All things considered, it’s surprising we aren’t worse.

Sources: BBL: Deloitte via SportsBusinessDaily; DEL: Deloitte via SportsBusinessDaily; 3. Liga: DFB official figure; Bundesliga: 2014 report; 2. Bundesliga: 2014 report; NFL: Forbes via Statistica; NBA: Forbes via Statistica; NHL: CBS Sports; MLB: Forbes; MLS: Forbes

 

MONEY

Stanley Cup Ticket Prices Collapse with Rangers Down 3-0

140610_EM_StanleyCup_1
New York Rangers Carl Hagelin (62), left, reacts as the Los Angeles Kings Willie Mitchell (33) and Slava Voynov (26), celebrate a second period goal by Mike Richards, center, during Game 3 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Final, Monday, June 9, 2014, in New York. Kathy Willens—AP

A week after Stanley Cup ticket prices soared, the Rangers are on the verge of losing the series to the L.A. Kings, and seats at New York's Madison Square Garden are selling below face value.

Here’s hoping you didn’t buy tickets for Game 4 of the Stanley Cup last week, when prices for the “cheap seats” spiked over $1,000 as New York Rangers fans eagerly sought the chance to see their team fight for the championship for the first time in two decades. The Rangers lost the first two games of the series against the Los Angeles Kings in excruciating overtime sessions in L.A. And after the Rangers lost Game 3 on Monday night at Madison Square Garden, the bottom dropped out of the market for tickets.

As of first thing on Tuesday morning, the get-in price on the secondary market for Game 4 in New York dropped 42.62% compared to asking prices prior to Game 3, according to the ticket sale and research site TiqIQ. Before the Rangers had gone down 3-0 in the series—one loss away from elimination—the get-in price for Game 4 stood at $955, down only slightly from last week. Afterwards, the cheapest tickets were selling for $548.

And prices have continued to fall. At the popular ticket resale site StubHub, get-in prices were starting at $528 as of 7 a.m. on Tuesday, and they dipped to $488 by 9:30, then to $470 by around 10:15.

Prices have already dropped below the face value of what’s currently being offered to the public via Ticketmaster, according to TiqIQ’s Chris Matcovich, who anticipates a further fall in price as we get closer to Game 4. “The quantity is not extremely high so I expect them to fall some more maybe $300’s,” Matchovich said via e-mail. “The crazier thing is a lot of people spent $1000 to $1100 earlier this week for this game. Now they wake up this morning and the value of their ticket has plummeted.”

As for a potential Game 6 back in New York’s Madison Square Garden, the get-in price is now hovering at about $1,100. That’s certainly pricey. But it’s down significantly from last week, when the cheapest seats were selling in excess of $1,700. If there is a Game 6, of course, the Rangers will have to have won Games 4 and 5, and they’ll be within a couple more wins of making an amazing comeback. Potentially.

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