TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: November 19

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. Teach data literacy in elementary school.

By Mohana Ravindranath in the Washington Post

2. A new app lets kids explore the life and living conditions of other children around the world.

By Laura Bliss in CityLab

3. Politics inside Yemen — once a reliable U.S. ally and success story in the war on terror — has pushed the nation out of our influence.

By Adam Baron in Defense One

4. When it comes to science and health news, radio might save journalism.

By Anna Clark in Columbia Journalism Review

5. Rooftop solar power could beat the price of coal in two years — if utilities don’t shut it down.

By Lucas Mearian in ComputerWorld

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: November 13

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. As separatists and Russian troops chip away at its sovereignty, Ukraine struggles with corruption while hunting heat for the coming winter.

By Leonid Bershidsky in Bloomberg View

2. Leading by example: One Silicon Valley superstar has put tech’s pernicious racism in his crosshairs.

By J.J. McCorvey in Fast Company

3. The most important element of the U.S.-China climate deal might be that China has stepped away from its go-it-alone approach on climate.

By Michael Levi at the Council on Foreign Relations

4. Is the next frontier of mesh networks — like the one that linked protestors in Hong Kong — serving news?

By Susan E. McGregor at NiemanLab

5. Lessons from the Bulungula Incubator: Zeroing in on poverty at the most basic level can catalyze community change — and transforms lives.

By Réjane Woodroffe in the Aspen Idea

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME viral

This Local News Reporter Dancing to T.I. Is Everything

"Where They At Doe" is unstoppable.

Local news is a treasure trove of incredible moments. Like this or this or this or this video of West Virginia news anchor Dan Thorn busting a move to T.I. at the news desk.

WVNS 59 News was on a commercial break, but the cameras were still rolling when the reporter started getting down to T.I.’s “Where They At Doe,” proving you don’t have to be in the club to drop it low.

While this video would seem to prove the theory that when T.I. plays, you dance, Thorn’s co-anchor Sarah Pisciuneri was clearly not impressed with his iPad-wielding dance moves. Her disinterest was explained when she tragically announced that she just can’t dance on camera. Seems like she could pick up a few pointers from Thorn on that front.

As for Thorn, now that he’s practiced dancing alone to T.I., we’ll look for his appearance on dancing alone to Pony.

H/T Tastefully Offensive

TIME Bizarre

Man Finds Out Wife Is Pregnant After Using Her Urine for His Drug Test

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Pregnancy Test Positive Getty Images

Surprise!

An Egyptian bus driver found out that his wife was two months pregnant, after submitting her urine in place of his own for a mandatory drug test, the BBC reports. After he assured officials that the sample was his own, he was reportedly told, “Congratulations, you’re pregnant.”

While more details were sparse, the BBC reported that some officials didn’t see this incident merely as a lighthearted prank, given that drug use is on the rise.

[BBC]

TIME Media

Conservatives Cluster Around Fox News, While Liberals Vary News Sources

And liberals make fickle friends

Pew Research Center

The most ideologically extreme Americans, both liberals and conservatives, have this much in common: they dominate our politics and drive our political discourse with far more influence than people with more mixed views.

But when it comes to where they get their information the two groups could hardly be further apart, according to a survey out Tuesday from the Pew Research Center’s Journalism project.

The survey results reflect a longterm trend of balkanization in American media, as the Internet and cable television, by giving people a wider array of choices, opened the way for news outlets increasingly tailored to particular ideological positions.

Nearly half of “consistent conservatives” go to Fox News as their main source of news about politics and government. Though the same group distrusts 24 of the 36 news sources measured in the survey, 88% of them trust Fox News. They’re more likely to have friends with the same political views and more likely than any other ideological group to hear views in line with their own expressed on Facebook.

Compare that with “consistent liberals,” who depend on a wider variety of news sources—chiefly CNN, MSNBC, NPR and The New York Times—and who tend to trust news outlets much more so than conservatives. Perhaps because they’re more likely to see political views that diverge from their own on Facebook, consistent liberals are more likely than anyone else to de-friend someone on a social network, or even end a good old fashioned brick-and-mortar friendship, over a political disagreement.

If you yearn for a less contentious, ideologue-driven version of American politics it’s not all bad news.

Pew Research Center

A strong majority of people who pay attention to political posts on Facebook (98%) say that at least some of the time they see posts with views that differ from their own. And among web users Facebook is far and away the biggest social media site and among one of the top sources of political news.

TIME Innovation

Five Best Ideas of the Day: October 10

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

1. With U.S. support, El Salvador is using community policing to address skyrocketing gang crime.

By Jude Joffe-Block in Fronteras

2. A new tool designed to flag bogus stories online might help combat rampant misinformation.

By Alexis Sobel Fitts in the Columbia Journalism Review

3. A multimillion dollar new high rise in Los Angeles exclusively for the city’s sick and vulnerable homeless residents reflects a powerful truth: we can’t ignore poverty away.

By Gale Holland in the Los Angeles Times

4. The CDC is using mobile phone data to track and stop Ebola in West Africa.

By Aliya Sternstein in NextGov

5. “Education is the most important right. When we get education, then we can bring change in our society.”

By Malala Yousafzai addressing the Aspen Ideas Festival

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME viral

September’s Best News Bloopers Include a Guy Immediately Dropping His Brand New iPhone 6

Your monthly dose of schadenfreude

September was a big month for news — much of it serious and sinister. But of course, there were plenty of lighter, sillier moments too, mostly in the form of on-air mishaps and blunders.

Each month, the YouTube channel NewsBeFunny rounds up the funniest, strangest and most cringe-worthy bloopers so we can all enjoy a nice heart dose of schadenfreude. September’s highlights include one of the first people to get an iPhone 6 immediately dropping it on the ground, a reporter quitting on air after outing herself as the owner of a medical marijuana club, and a bat flying around a TV studio.

MORE: The Best News Bloopers of August

MORE: The Best News Bloopers of July

 

TIME Race

Survey: Blacks and Hispanics Say News Doesn’t Reflect Their Communities

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Jose Luis Pelaez—Getty Images

1,492 U.S. adults were polled about the media over the phone

Black and Hispanic Americans say the media does not accurately cover their communities, according to a study released Tuesday.

The survey of 1,492 U.S. adults was conducted over the phone by the Media Insight Project, a joint initiative of the American Press Institute and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Media Insight Project found that 33% of Hispanics and 25% of African-Americans believe the media portrays their community accurately. Only 19% of the African-Americans polled said that the most accurate coverage of their community comes from general local news, and only 18% from African-American specific news sources. Of Hispanic Americans, 49% said they felt that the most accurate news comes from Hispanic specific sources.

The full survey results can be found here.

TIME Spain

Go Inside the World’s Biggest Tomato Fight

The La Tomatina festival draws thousands of people to Bunol, Spain, every year

Getting into a food fight is every school kid’s fantasy, but once a year in the town of Bunol, Spain, it becomes a reality.

The objective of the La Tomatina festival is simple: Throw as many tomatoes at other people as you can (or perhaps just roll around in the puree that covers the streets). This year, according to the Associated Press, there were approximately 125 tons of tomatoes and 22,000 participants.

Both residents and non-residents participate in the festival. This is the second year that Bunol charged out-of-towners 10 Euros (about $13) to help paint their town red.

[AP]

TIME viral

The Best News Bloopers of August

With a special cameo from the 'Apparently Kid' and a hilariously solemn "breaking news" announcement

It’s been a pretty dismal month, as far as world events go, but the news wasn’t all bad thanks to some very entertaining on-air mishaps. So here you go: seven minutes of pure schadenfreude.

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