TIME ebola

Nebraska Hospital Recalls ‘Heroic Effort’ to Save Ebola Victim Martin Salia

Doctor Being Treated For Ebola In Nebraska Dies Of Virus
FREETOWN, SIERRA LEONE - APRIL 5, 2014: In this handout provided by the United Methodist News Service, surgeon Dr. Martin Salia, poses for a photo at the United Methodist Church's Kissy Hospital April 5, 2014 outside Freetown, Sierra Leone. Salia, was flown to Omaha, Nebraska from Sierra Leone for treatment at the medical center's specialized bio-containment unit after testing positive for Ebola. According to the Medical Cental Martin Salia died on November 17, 2014 as a result of the advanced symptoms of the disease. (Photo by Mike DuBose/United Methodist News Service via Getty Images) Handout—Getty Images

Doctor arrived critically ill from Sierra Leone on Saturday

Doctors in Omaha who helped to treat a surgeon who had contracted Ebola in Sierra Leone said at a news conference Monday that the virus had progressed too far for him to be saved.

Nebraska Medical Center called its treatment of Dr. Martin Salia a “heroic effort.” Salia arrived critically ill on Saturday and was given the experimental drug ZMapp as well as a transfusion of blood from someone who had survived the disease. The hospital, which had previously treated two other cases successfully, did not disclose the donor.

“Even though this was the best possible place for a patient, at the very advanced stages, even the most modern techniques that we have at our disposal are not enough to treat these patients,” said a hospital representative involved in Salia’s care during the news conference.

Salia was said to have no kidney function, working extremely hard to breathe and was unresponsive. The hospital placed Salia on dialysis but he eventually went into complete respiratory failure. He had severely low blood pressure and progressed to cardiac arrest. He died around 4 a.m. on Monday.

“It was an absolute honor to care for Dr. Salia,” said one of the nurses involved in his care.

The White House issued a statement after news of Salia’s death became public: “Dr. Salia’s passing is another reminder of the human toll of this disease and of the continued imperative to tackle this epidemic on the frontlines, where Dr. Salia was engaged in his calling.”

More than 5,000 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, the World Health Organization reports, including at least 324 health care workers.

TIME ebola

Ebola Survivor Speaks Out: ‘Blessed to Be Alive’

American video journalist Ashoka Mukpo at an iron ore mining camp in Bong County, Liberia in Aug. 2013
American video journalist Ashoka Mukpo at an iron ore mining camp in Bong County, Liberia in Aug. 2013 Philip Marcelo—AP

Ebola survivor and NBC freelancer Ashoka Mukpo says “today is a joyful day,” in a statement he released Wednesday about his recovery.

Mukpo, who was infected with Ebola while working in Liberia, was evacuated to Nebraska Medical Center for treatment. “I owe this staff a debt I can’t ever repay,” said Mukpo in a statement.

The fact that Mukpo was able to be treated in America is a circumstance that weighs on him, he writes: “I feel profoundly blessed to be alive, and in the same breath aware of the global inequalities that allowed me to be flown to an American hospital when so many Liberians die alone with minimal care.” He thanked everyone from the United States State Department, to Doctors Without Borders to NBC.

He paid a special thanks to fellow survivor Dr. Kent Brantly, who donated blood to Mukpo. “May his health flourish and his compassion be known to all,” said Mukpo.

Mukpo was declared free of Ebola and released from the hospital on Oct. 21. It’s unclear how exactly he was infected with the disease. Mukpo says he plans to discuss his experience in writing, and will talk to media, but for now he is spending time with his family and asks for privacy.

You can read his full statement here.

TIME ebola

Third American Ebola Patient Arrives in Omaha

The ambulance transporting Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, who was infected with Ebola while serving as an obstetrician in Liberia, arrives to the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Sept. 5, 2014.
The ambulance transporting Dr. Rick Sacra, 51, who was infected with Ebola while serving as an obstetrician in Liberia, arrives to the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Sept. 5, 2014. Nati Harnik—AP

The American missionary became infected after delivering babies in Liberia

The third American known to have contracted the Ebola virus has arrived in Omaha, Nebraska for treatment.

Dr. Richard A Sacra, 51, fell ill with the disease while working as missionary delivering babies in Liberia, one of the West African countries worst hit by a recent Ebola outbreak. The Massachusetts man will receive treatment at the Nebraska Medial Center, which has the largest bio-containment unit in the United States.

The medical facility is one of only four in the U.S. with the special equipment needed to safely care for people with dangerous contagious diseases like ebola.

Bruce Johnson, president of SIM USA, the missionary group for whom Sacra works, made a statement thanking the many parties involved in Sacra’s evacuation from Liberia. “The logistics and coordination were complex. We give praise to God that it came together so quickly and seamlessly,” he said. “Rick will be embarrassed when he finds out about all the attention.”

Little is known at present about Sacra’s condition, but officials say he was able to walk onto the plane that transported him to Omaha and is in good spirits, reports local ABC affiliate KETV.

“We are really encouraged by that news and looking forward to reuniting with him,” said Sacra’s wife, Debbie.

Ebola has spread rapidly through west Africa in recent months, killing more than 1,900 people.

[KETV]

TIME Crime

COPS Crewmember Dies After Being Shot By Police During Robbery

Bryce Dion, 38, died Wednesday following a shootout in an Omaha Wendy's late Tuesday

A crewmember working for the television show COPS was killed Wednesday after being shot by police responding to an armed robbery at an Omaha, Nebraska fast food restaurant.

Officers called to the Tuesday night theft fired over 30 shots into the Wendy’s restaurant, according to the Omaha World Herald. The robbery suspect, later identified by local officials as Cortez Washington, was reportedly holding an plastic pellet gun which officers mistook for a lethal weapon. Washington, 32, was killed in the shooting, as was Bryce Dion, 38, the COPS crewmember.

At a press conference in Omaha on Wednesday, representatives from Langley Productions, which produces COPS, said Dion was “one of our best guys.” The Langley spokesperson added that Dion was “very talented” and “very dedicated to his job.”

COPS is a long-running show, formerly on Fox and now on Spike, which documents real-world police activities.

[Omaha World Herald]

MONEY Autos

WATCH: Secret Shopper at Cadillac Dealership Turns Out to Be Warren Buffett

Buffett was so pleased he sent a letter to GM CEO Mary Barra to compliment the service his daughter received at an Omaha Cadillac dealership.

TIME Appreciation

Nebraska Firm Pays Out $61K in Bonuses Exclusively in $2 Bills

24820744
Two dollar bill Getty Images

If your grandpa gave bonuses, this would be how he'd do it

It turns out that Nebraska-based Hornady Manufacturing is the kooky grandpa of the business world. Why? Because the ammunition manufacturer gave its 300-plus employees $61,000 in bonus money exclusively in $2 bills.

But unlike the $2 bills Pop-Pop gave you when you were good last Christmas, these bills aren’t meant to be hoarded in your special drawer.

“Two years ago, we caught a lot of flack from the city council and some people in the city of Grand Island for how we don’t support the community and we don’t do things around here, which we disagreed with… [it] kind of hurt our feelings,” VP Jason Hornady told Omaha.com. And so, to prove a point, he is asking employees to spend the bills at local businesses.

“If people look at you funny, tell them where you work, and we think that they will notice,” said the vice president, whose company slogan promises dependability (as well as accuracy and deadliness).

Hornady’s father, Steve, had done a similar bit with $1 coins a few years ago, but surely asking employees to lug those things around is just cruel.

Hornady also clarified that employees aren’t only getting paid in Monopoly money. “They also receive a nice check and a deposit into their 401(k)s,” that they can spend wherever.

Bonuses reportedly total 40% of employees’ regular pay.

[Omaha.com]

TIME weather

Two Tornadoes Hit Nebraska During Midwest Thunderstorms

Monday's storms have caused damage in Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota

Updated: June 16, 2014, 8:22 p.m. E.T.

In a rare meteorological event, two tornadoes appeared near a small town in Nebraska, killing at least one person and injuring many others, while large thunderstorms raged throughout the Midwest on Monday.

The fatality and at least 15 critically injured people were brought to the Faith Regional Medical Center in Norfolk, Neb., the hospital’s director of marketing and public-information officer said, USA Today reports.

The dual twisters began near Pilger, Neb., at approximately 4:20 p.m. local time — a little more than an hour after the National Weather Service issued a “Particularly Dangerous Situation” tornado watch for the northeastern portion of the state, Mashable reports. The city has a population of roughly 350 people, according to data from the 2010 Census, and there have been reports of considerable damage and destruction.

Hail and high-speed winds have also caused damage throughout the Midwest. The National Weather Service predicted tornado activity last week when data from satellite imagery, weather balloons and other sources showed off-the-charts wind activity and precarious atmospheric conditions in parts of states including Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota.

[Mashable]

MONEY Autos

WATCH: Hail Yes! Car Dealers Slash Prices on Storm-Damaged Vehicles

Severe hailstorms in the West and Midwest have one benefit for bargain-hunters: Discounts on damaged cars.

TIME weather

Baseball-Size Hail Rains Down on Nebraska as Thunderstorms Inundate Midwest

Severe Weather
A car with its windows damaged by hail hangs over a creek following a severe thunderstorm in Blair, Neb., Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Nati Harnik—AP

Wild weather sweeps across the Midwest

Hard rain and hailstones inundated large swaths of the Great Plains on Tuesday as officials issued tornado watches in Nebraska that will continue late into the evening in the Cornhusker State.

“Storms may contain very heavy rain, large hail and a few tornadoes,” warned the National Weather Service in a bulletin posted on its website on Tuesday.

Baseball-size hail reportedly fell across northeast Nebraska on Tuesday, causing extensive damage.

The hail knocked out car windshields in affected areas, while the roof of at least one hotel in Missouri Valley, Iowa, was ripped off by high winds, according to CNN.

The National Weather Service predicted that another string of heavy thunderstorms is likely to move across the heartland from the Texas panhandle to western South Dakota on Wednesday.

TIME 2014 Election

Nebraska Senate Race Bridges Republican Divide

Nebraska Election Ben Sasse, Shane Osborn, Sid Dinsdale
This combo picture contains photos of Nebraska Senate candidates in the May 13, 2014 primary election. From left: Ben Sasse, Shane Osborn, Sid Dinsdale. Nati Harnik—AP

Both the frontrunners may fall in Nebraska, one of 2014's most competitive GOP primaries

The most interesting Republican primary of 2014 culminates Tuesday night in tiny Nebraska, where three candidates have a shot at winning a race that upends every tidy narrative about the party’s divisions.

Until recently, the contest to succeed retiring GOP Sen. Mike Johanns seemed like a two-man race between Ben Sasse and Shane Osborn. Sasse was cast as the Tea Party candidate after winning endorsements from a raft of national conservative groups and major elected officials. Osborn, a former Navy pilot and state treasurer, has support from influential party figures linked to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. As a result, the race has often been framed as a battle between the party’s Tea Party and establishment factions.

The reality is more complicated.

Tea Party groups are desperate for a Sasse victory. The movement’s chosen candidates are struggling to gain traction in a spate of high-profile races this year, and the youthful president of Nebraska’s Midland University might be the best chance for national groups like the Senate Conservatives Fund to score a win. But this is not your typical proxy fight between the GOP’s grassroots and grandees.

Some Nebraska conservatives actually prefer Osborn. Many of the same establishment strategists vying to squash Tea Party candidates elsewhere love Sasse. And while Sasse has worn the Tea Party mantle and cut soft ads emphasizing his Nebraska roots, his resume includes a stint in the Bush Administration and posts at Yale, Oxford and McKinsey. The national support for Sasse’s candidacy actually seems to have made Nebraskans suspicious. “That does rile a few people,” Faron Hines, an activist with the York County Tea Party, told TIME recently, after the conservative group FreedomWorks revoked its endorsement for Osborn and gave it to Sasse. “Who is he going to represent when he gets to Washington?”

Enter Sid Dinsdale. The snowy-haired president of a local bank has lagged behind Sasse and Osborn for months. But as the frontrunners trained their fire on each other, Dinsdale quietly consolidated support. Polls suggest a late surge. National groups like the Club for Growth were concerned enough to go up on air with ads blasting Dinsdale, suggesting that Sasse—one of the few candidates this year who bridges the party’s internal divides—could lose.

For proof that such an upset is possible, one need only look to the state’s junior Republican senator. In 2012, Deb Fischer pulled off an upset victory in a crowded Republican primary, coming from behind in the race’s final weeks in a race against two well-funded statewide officials. As the better-known frontrunners battered one another, Fischer slipped between them and sprinted to victory.

Dinsdale has tried to replicate that path. While he may lack Fischer’s folksy appeal to the state’s conservative base, he was able to pump $1 million of his own fortune into the race, enough to fund plenty of TV ads in a state with cheap media markets and less than two million people. The banker also drew a coveted endorsement from the Omaha World-Herald. “As Nebraska as they come,” the paper declared, in a pointed jab at the out-of-state money and muscle marshaled by his opponents.

All these swirling factors portend an exciting finish for one of the year’s best primary contests.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser