TIME Basketball

3-Peat: UConn Beats Notre Dame 63-53 for 3rd Straight Title

Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis #23 of the Connecticut Huskies holds the trophy after defeating the Notre Dame Fighting Irish 63-53 during the NCAA Women's Final Four National Championship at Amalie Arena on April 7, 2015 in Tampa, Fla.
Mike Carlson—Getty Images Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis #23 of the Connecticut Huskies holds the trophy after defeating the Notre Dame Fighting Irish 63-53 during the NCAA Women's Final Four National Championship at Amalie Arena on April 7, 2015 in Tampa, Fla.

The Huskies have won five of the last seven titles

(TAMPA) — Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis and Moriah Jefferson each scored 15 points and UConn beat Notre Dame 63-53 on Tuesday night to win the Huskies third straight championship and 10th overall, tying Geno Auriemma with John Wooden for the most titles in college basketball.

UConn’s coach has now won all 10 of his trips to the national championship game. The Huskies have won five of the last seven titles.

Breanna Stewart stated when she came to UConn that her goal was to win four championships. The junior is now one title away from being the first to win four straight. Stewart has been a huge reason why the Huskies have been on their won three consecutive titles.

The 6-foot-4 star is the latest in a long line of outstanding UConn players that Auriemma has coached, including Rebecca Lobo, Diana Taurasi, Sue Bird and Maya Moore.

TIME Basketball

Duke Wins National Championship, Beating Wisconsin in Title Game

NCAA Basketball: Final Four-Championship Game-Wisconsin vs Duke
Bob Donnan—USA TODAY Sports/Reuters Duke Blue Devils guard Quinn Cook and teammates hoist the NCAA championship trophy after defeating the Wisconsin Badgers at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis on April 6, 2015

Duke overcame a nine-point second-half deficit and foul trouble to its two biggest stars to win the fifth national championship in school history, beating Wisconsin 68-63 on Monday night in Indianapolis.

The Badgers took a 58-56 lead with 4:25 to go on a Sam Dekker layup, but the Blue Devils responded with a 10-0 run, capped by a Tyus Jones three-pointer, for a 66-58 lead with 1:24 remaining. A three by Frank Kaminsky and a dunk by Nigel Hayes pulled Wisconsin within 66-63, but Jones hit two free throws to restore a five-point lead and Wisconsin missed a pair of three-pointers on its final trip down court.

Kaminsky, the national player of the year, had 21 points and 11 rebounds for the Badgers while his All-America counterpart for the Blue Devils, Jahlil Okafor, was limited to 10 points and three rebounds while sitting for much of the second half with four fouls. Duke’s Justise Winslow also had four fouls but finished with 11 points and eight rebounds.

Wisconsin opened up a nine-point lead at 48-39 with 13:23 remaining, but freshman guard Grayson Allen led the Blue Devils back by responding with a three-pointer and a three-point play on Duke’s next two possessions to cut the deficit to three.

The Blue Devils were within 52-51 when Okafor came back in the game with three fouls, but he missed a jumper in the lane that would have put Duke in front. On the other end, Kaminsky spun past Okafor, who drew his fourth foul. Kaminsky completed a three-point play that put Wisconsin back up by four at the 9:18 mark.

The Blue Devils wouldn’t go away though, tying the game at 54 on a jumper by Jones with 6:58 to go and going in front on a layup by Allen at 56-54 less than a minute later. Jones and Allen carried Duke in the second half while Okafor and Winslow were in foul trouble. Jones finished with 19 points and was named the Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four while Allen, who averaged just 4.0 points per game, had 16.

​The game was tied at 31 after a first half that featured 13 lead changes.

It was the fifth championship in nine trips to the title game for Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski. Wisconsin was playing in its first championship game since winning the title in 1941, the third year of the NCAA tournament’s existence.

This article originally appeared on SI.com

TIME Basketball

Duke Tops Wisconsin 68-63 for NCAA Basketball Title

Wisconsin v Duke
Andy Lyons—Getty Images Justise Winslow, center, and Matt Jones, right, of the Duke Blue Devils celebrate with teammates after defeating the Wisconsin Badgers at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis on April 6, 2015

Duke beats Wisconsin 68-63 for NCAA men's basketball title

(INDIANAPOLIS) — Jahlil Okafor scored two big buckets late and his freshman buddy Tyus Jones hit a key 3-pointer to lift Duke to its fifth national title Monday night in a 68-63 comeback win over Wisconsin.

Okafor spent big chunks of the second half on the bench after drawing his third, then his fourth foul.

When he returned, he beat Wisconsin’s big man, senior Frank Kaminksy, for a pair of buckets, then Jones hit a 3-pointer to complete a run from nine down to eight up with 1:22 left.

Blue Devils coach Mike Krzyzewski captured his fifth title, putting him in second place alone behind John Wooden.

Kaminsky outscored Okafor 21-10 but came up short in his last game, as the Badgers (36-4) couldn’t duplicate their thrilling win over Kentucky two nights earlier.

Jones led the Blue Devils (35-4) with 23 points.

TIME Basketball

Wisconsin Topples Undefeated Kentucky in Final Four

Wisconsin Badgers forward Sam Dekker (15) battles with Kentucky Wildcats guard Devin Booker (1) in action during a NCAA Final Four game between the Wisconsin Badgers and the Kentucky Wildcats, at Lucas Oil Stadium, in Indianapolis on March 4, 2015.
Robin Alam—AP Wisconsin Badgers forward Sam Dekker (15) battles with Kentucky Wildcats guard Devin Booker (1) in action during a NCAA Final Four game between the Wisconsin Badgers and the Kentucky Wildcats, at Lucas Oil Stadium, in Indianapolis on March 4, 2015.

The Wisconsin Badgers beat the Kentucky Wildcats 71-64

(INDIANAPOLIS) — Nobody ever said they were perfect. Now, the Kentucky Wildcats aren’t undefeated, either.

The hard-nosed Wisconsin Badgers did what nobody else could this season: They knocked off the Wildcats 71-64 on Saturday night behind 20 points and 11 rebounds from birthday boy Frank Kaminsky and a clutch comeback down the stretch.

Now, instead of Kentucky going for history, it’s Wisconsin heading to the final Monday night to play Duke. The Badgers, who lost 80-70 to Duke in a December meeting in Madison, opened as a one-point favorite.

“I just feel like we wanted to win the national title, and we didn’t do it,” Wildcats freshman Tyler Ulis said. “So the season was a waste.”

Some of the Kentucky players skulked off without shaking their opponents’ hands.

The Wildcats close the season at 38-1 — two wins short of becoming the first undefeated team in college basketball since the 1975-76 Indiana Hoosiers. Instead, this NBA-ready group joins the star-studded 1991 UNLV team as the latest to take an undefeated record into the Final Four but lose in the semifinals.

“I’ve had some tough losses and some unbelievable wins at the buzzer,” coach John Calipari said. “My concern is that these guys keep it in perspective. They just had an historic year. If you want to blame anyone, blame me.”

Plenty of folks will take pleasure in that.

Trending on Twitter shortly after the buzzer: “38-and-Done.” And “38-and-1.”

All easy pickins for the many detractors of Calipari’s group of “One and Done” players, All-Americans and other future first-rounders and lottery picks.

But there’s more than one program sending players to the NBA — more than one team that keeps on fighting even when things look bleak.

Wisconsin had every reason to turtle, going without a point for six minutes during an 8-0 Kentucky run that put the Wildcats up by four and left the Badgers gasping for breath and resting their hands on their knees.

Instead, they answered the Kentucky run with an 8-0 run of their own to set up the pullaway. It was a Kentucky-like effort, the kind the Wildcats pulled off yet again last week in a two-point win over Notre Dame in the regional final that made them look more gritty than invincible.

“I think you guys have seen that all year,” Wisconsin senior Sam Dekker said. “Whether we’re down six or up 20, we’re going to be us, and we’re going to play our game.”

Dekker, a future NBAer himself, did most of the damage during Wisconsin’s comeback and eventual pullaway.

He started the run with bucket from the paint over Trey Lyles, then Nigel Hayes tied the game by tipping in an air ball after the clock had clearly turned to “0.” No violation was called, and in a game full of shaky officiating that left both coaches screaming, it generated momentum for the Badgers and left Kentucky flat.

Tied at 60, Andrew Harrison missed on Kentucky’s next possession. Dekker followed by spotting up for a 3-pointer that gave Wisconsin the lead for good with 1:42 left, then drawing a charge call when Lyles slammed his shoulder into Dekker’s chest.

Another free throw made it 64-60 and Kentucky was in full comeback mode.

Ahead 64-63 with 24 seconds left, Kaminsky, who was celebrating his 22nd birthday, hit two free throws. He and Bronson Koenig went 7 for 8 from the line over the last 24 seconds to seal the win.

“Best birthday present I’ve ever had,” Kaminsky said.

Kentucky’s last, best chance came while trailing by three with 12 seconds left. But Karl-Anthony Towns, who led the Wildcats with 16 points and nine rebounds, received the ball in the post and got fouled. He made only one free throw, and from there, Wisconsin iced it from the line.

Some stats that made the difference: Wisconsin shot 47.9 percent from the floor — 13 points higher than what Kentucky allowed this season — and went 10 for 20 from 3-point range. The Badgers, ranked 262nd in the country in offensive rebounding this season, finished with 12 to only six for Kentucky. It helped explain how Kentucky could lose despite shooting 48 percent itself and committing only six turnovers.

Junior Willie Cauley-Stein, a key to Kentucky’s success this year, finished with two points and five rebounds.

Calipari said the pressure of being perfect wasn’t the difference in this one.

“I think what impacted the game was the most was Wisconsin and how they play,” he said.

A bunch of Wildcats tugged at their jerseys and walked slowly off the court — losers for the first time this season, and the first time since last year’s final against UConn. A few, like Towns, Cauley-Stein and Lyles, will be first-round picks if they leave college for the NBA’s millions.

They wanted a title, too.

“We didn’t care about the record,” Towns said. “We just cared about the trophy that came with it.”

TIME Basketball

See NCAA Coaches Shouting During March Madness Games

Whether they're angry or just trying to be encouraging, these coaches have a lot to say

TIME College Basketball

Here’s Your 2015 Final Four Drinking Game

Aaron Harrison of the Kentucky Wildcats celebrates after defeating the Notre Dame Fighting Irish during the Midwest Regional Final of the 2015 NCAA Men's Basketball tournament at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, on Mar. 28, 2015.
Gregory Shamus—Getty Images Aaron Harrison of the Kentucky Wildcats celebrates after defeating the Notre Dame Fighting Irish during the Midwest Regional Final of the 2015 NCAA Men's Basketball tournament at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, on Mar. 28, 2015.

How to liven up a hoops party -- responsibly

TIME introduced its inaugural Final Four drinking game last year, and our second installment is back by popular demand—just in time for Saturday’s match-ups from Indianapolis. Duke plays Michigan State at 6:09 p.m. E.T., while Wisconsin and Kentucky tip off at 8:49 p.m. TBS will broadcast both games.

As always, please play responsibly. Follow local laws, don’t overindulge and please take a cab home if need be.

With that, here are this year’s rules:

Drink When Raf Calls “Man-to-Man”

Announcer Bill Raftery, the avuncular, white-haired former coach who has popularized phrases like “with a kiss” for a player who makes a bank shot, will finally call a Final Four on television. This honor is long overdue, and the arrest of former top analyst Greg Anthony in January for allegedly soliciting a prostitute created a spot for Raftery. Listen for the sweetest sound in March: at the beginning of each game, soon after the tip, Raftery will chirp that the defense is in “man-to-man!” He’s pumped, so you’re pumped. Who wouldn’t drink to that?

Raise Your Glass When TBS Airs Gordon Hayward’s Missed Half Court Shot

This is the first Final Four in Indianapolis since 2010, when the Blue Devils cut down the nets at Lucas Oil Stadium after defeating Butler in the championship game, 61-59. Butler’s Gordon Hayward, who now plays for the Utah Jazz, barely missed a half-court shot at the buzzer that would have given the hometown Bulldogs the win. TBS producers surely have that clip cued up for Saturday.

When You See a Slap, Hit the Tap

To rev themselves up, Duke players love to slap the floor.

Take a Sip When Announcers Play Up Michigan State’s Hometown Friends

Michigan State players Denzel Valentine and Bryn Forbes grew up together in Lansing, Michigan, a jump shot away from Michigan State’s campus in East Lansing. They’d down Capri Suns from Valentine’s fridge and were high school teammates. The announcers will start yapping about the Lansing connection, and you’ll know what to do.

Drink When Frank the Tank Makes an Improbable Shot

Wisconsin’s Frank “the Tank” Kaminsky, arguably the country’s best college player, is effective because he can score in all sorts of different ways. Drink up every time Tank makes a goofy, off-balance shot that has no business going in.

Finish Your Beer When Dekker Hits a Three

Sharpshooter Sam Dekker torched Arizona in the West region final, scoring 27 points in Wisconsin’s 85-78 win. In the second half, Dekker didn’t miss a shot, going 6-6 from the field and 3-3 from the foul line. His three off the dribble in the waning seconds sealed the win, and made Aaron Rodgers real happy. “Sam Dekker pretty much crushed our dreams,” Arizona’s T.J. McConnell said after the game. But he may even liven up your party, if you sip when Dekker hits a three.

Down a Drink When the Announcers Name Drop the Harrison Twins

In last year’s Kentucky-Wisconsin national semifinal, Kentucky guard Aaron Harrison hit the game-winning three pointer with less than 6 seconds left. He hit another big one down the stretch in Kentucky’s thrilling 68-66 victory over Notre Dame in the regional last Saturday, and in that game, his twin brother Andrew made the deciding free throws. In last year’s title game, however, UConn’s guards outplayed Kentucky’s brotherly backcourt, a key factor in UConn’s win.

Toast to Ashley Judd Hitting the Jumbotron

When the camera pans to Kentucky super fan Ashley Judd, which seems to happen a few dozen times every game, keep the celebration going.

Bottoms Up When Announcers Predict First-Draft Picks

If you prefer pro hoops to the college version, you should still tune into this year’s Final Four, for no other reason than you’ll see plenty of future NBA talent. One writer predicts that as many as eight top prospects may be selected by NBA teams that participate in the annual draft lottery, where the luck of the ping-pong ball determines a bad team’s draft position.

Cheers to a Potentially Perfect Season

The biggest storyline going into this year’s Final Four: Kentucky’s quest for perfection. The Wildcats are 38-0, and two more wins would give them the first perfect season in major men’s college basketball since 1975-1976, when the Indiana Hoosiers of Kent Benson, Quinn Buckner and Scott May ran the table. So raise a glass every time you hear “1976 Indiana Hoosiers.” We’ll drink to history.

TIME College Basketball

That Last-Second Free-Throw in the Duke-Utah Game Cost Vegas Millions

during a South Regional Semifinal game of the 2015 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at NRG Stadium on March 27, 2015 in Houston, Texas.
Tom Pennington—2015 Getty Images Quinn Cook #2 of the Duke Blue Devils and Delon Wright #55 of the Utah Utes battle for a rebound during a South Regional Semifinal game of the 2015 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at NRG Stadium on March 27, 2015 in Houston, Texas.

The whistle was ignored in the stadium but heard loud and clear by bettors

A seemingly meaningless free-throw shot in the Duke-Utah Sweet 16 game cost Vegas big bucks Friday night.

When the buzzer sounded, Duke was up five points 62-57. That was bad news for bettors who picked Duke. Since most sportsbooks had Duke as a 5-point favorite, Duke would have to win by more than 5 points for those bettors to get paid. But after players had already left the court, officials said they had called a last-second foul. Putting 0.7 seconds back on the clock, Duke guard Quinn Cook sank one free-throw that cost casinos thousands because they were forced to pay the three-quarters of bettors who had placed their money on Duke.

Exactly how much money casinos lost is still unclear, but it’s probably in the millions. “It caused a million-dollar swing with parlay liability, to the bad,” MGM vice president of race and sports Jay Rood told ESPN.

Here’s what happened: Duke led 62-57 with 10 seconds left in the game when Cook rebounded a missed shot by Utah forward Jordan Loveridge. Cook wrestled for the ball with Utah defenders in what could have been a jump ball call. But the whistles stayed silent, and Cook dribbled out of trouble.

With the game seemingly over, the Utes began to head back to the locker room as the Blue Devils celebrated. But officials said they called a foul on Utah guard Brandon Taylor who grabbed Cook as he was dribbling away with 0.7 seconds left. Officials called the Utes back to the court so Cook could shoot what seemed to the players to be pointless free-throws. Duke came away with its 6-point victory.

According to ESPN, 77% of spread bettors were on Duke on Friday night. Las Vegas sportsbook operator CG Technology said they had a six-figure swing after the free-throw, according to ESPN.

Bettors tweeted their fury and joy—depending upon where they placed their bets:

Watch the last-second foul below:

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MONEY Sports

The Massive Money Behind March Madness

The annual NCAA basketball tournament has an enormous television presence, and its revenues have only been growing in recent years.

TIME apps

These 8 March Madness Apps Are a Slam Dunk

Kentucky v Arkansas
Andy Lyons—Getty Images Tyler Ulis #3 of the Kentucky Wildcats goes to the basket as Rashad Madden #00 of the Arkansas Razorbacks defends during the championship game of the SEC basketball tournament at Bridgestone Arena on March 15, 2015 in Nashville, Tennessee.

These sure-shots will get you in the games you love

With the tip-off of the NCAA’s national men’s basketball championship tournament, all eyes and ears are pointed towards the hardwood Thursday, whether you’re perched in a corner office or cheering from some nosebleed seats. But wherever you watch the games from, your experience will no doubt be enhanced by a second screen where March Madness apps can do everything from keep track of your bracket to stream live video of the action.

Here are eight great March Madness apps worth loading into your tablet or smartphone:

Bracket The Madness

If you’re a fan of the dark horse or the underdog, this is the app you’re rooting for this March. A breakaway hit among basketball fans, this app lets people create their own pools which can be shared with Facebook friends or even via text.

And while you might’ve missed out on most of this app’s magic after the initial tip-off, it’s also got an easy to read bracket that’s updated live (ideal for staying in the loop on hoops as the month goes on) and a fun, beat-the-clock game where you try to pick the winner of all of 2014’s tournament games. (It’s even hard to pick the winners after the game has ended.)

Bracket The Madness is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

CBS Sports

Whether you load this onto a tablet or a smartphone, this play-maker can do it all: scoring big with great, succinct analysis of the games (before and after tip-off), or passing you off to the NCAA March Madness Live app (see below) for live, in-game video. Though it overs all major sports, the app excels in its college basketball coverage, with links to breaking news, its blog, and expert picks.

CBS Sports is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

Fanatic

Wherever life has brought you, it’s probably far from your alma mater. No bother — with Fanatic, you can find fan-friendly watering holes where you can enjoy a game in the company of people who bleed the same sports colors that you do.

Now, truth be told, this app isn’t as accurate as I’d like it to be. When using its location-based search to find a nearby bar for my team, it didn’t give top-billing the one I know to be the home court for my town’s displaced fans. So, if you’re hoping to find the best spot, I’d recommend pairing Fanatic with a Google search for maximum effect. But it’s good for every major sport, so don’t delete this app after they cut down the nets.

Fanatic is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

Sports Betting

If I were a betting man — and I am not — I’d put my money on this app when it comes to sizing up the individual March Madness match-ups. Sure, there may be more comprehensive odds-making apps out there, but for the casual fan (which includes most people who get swept up in basketball hysteria each March), Sports Betting provides clear information on the money line, point spread, and total points. And by simply tapping on the figures, the app shows you how much you’d win if you put down a bet — which you would do for entertainment purposes only, of course.

Sports Betting is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

NCAA March Madness Live

No matter what television station the game is on, it’s also available to watch live on the NCAA’s official app. Free to download, the app requires you to log in with your cable provider information to watch the games. (Don’t be fooled by the app’s free, temporary preview — you will have to log in.)

The best way to get the hardwood action at your office or even on-the-go, the app goes beyond the live game streams, offering a great array of behind-the-scenes videos and historical highlights. And setting it up with notifications is another great way to stay up to speed on the scores, right from the source, while doing other things (like your job).

NCAA March Madness Live is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

Thuuz

Watching all sixty-seven games is a big commitment, but Thuuz helps make it more manageable by telling you when the action is heating up. Rating games on a scale of 0-100, it tells sports fans of all stripes whether a game is worth watching. But once the first whistle blows, the app adjusts those ratings in real-time, telling, for example, if a low-ranked underdog who was expected to be blown out is in the mix to pull off a fantastic upset. In addition, the app can track your favorite teams and even your fantasy football and baseball players, so you can turn on the TV when they’re having a game for the ages.

Thuuz is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

TuneIn Radio

Radio may be a shorter-wave technology, but TuneIn takes it worldwide with their streaming of local stations. By dumping a video stream for an audio play-by-play, the app will let you focus on the job at-hand, whether you’re a truck driver or a desk jockey. And TuneIn has a lot of live game broadcasts available — check out this link for what’s airing right now — which means even if you can’t watch the game, you don’t have to miss a minute of the action.

TuneIn Radio is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

WatchESPN

Okay, so the worldwide leader in sports may not be broadcasting the NCAA games, but you know they are drooling over the highlights, digesting the effects of the surprise outcomes, and breaking down all the daily news. To watch the network’s channels (which include everything from the flagship station to the ESPN SEC Network), you’ll need a cable company log-in. But once you get past that gatekeeper, the only thing keeping you from watching as many basketball highlights as you can handle is your bandwidth. (Speaking of that, you might want to only use this app on Wi-Fi, because it will crush your wireless data budget.)

WatchESPN is available for free on the App Store and Google Play.

MONEY College

Why Harvard Will Win the NCAA Tournament

150319_FF_MarchMadnessHarvard
Hunter Martin—Getty Images Fans of the Harvard Crimson celebrate a win over the Yale Bulldogs in mid-March. Just imagine how excited they will be in Indianapolis in April if we're right.

Sure, the No. 13 seed in the West is a long shot. But our March Madness bracket favors colleges that produce alumni who win the financial tournament of life.

For the three weeks known as March Madness, college basketball fans focus on stats like field goal percentages or player efficiency. But we here at MONEY try to stay sane and pay attention to the numbers that matter over the long term.

So when we filled out this year’s NCAA men’s tournament bracket, we picked teams based on our Best Colleges rankings, which look at which schools do best in terms of affordability, quality of education, and graduating students into good-paying jobs. In other words, if we gathered these players and their classmates together again in, say, 25 or 50 years, who would likely be on the best financial footing?

This gave us an unorthodox final four of Harvard (6th in our value rankings, while a 13th seed in the tournament), Notre Dame (20th), Virginia (16th), and UCLA (31st), with Harvard besting Virginia in Indianapolis on April 6.

That Harvard is the overall winner is not exactly surprisingly: 97% of students graduate, there have been no recent defaulters on student loans, and the average recent graduate is earning about $55,000 a year these days, according to data from Payscale.com. But the elite private colleges don’t dominate in this bracket or in life. Two of our final four are public universities–Virginia and UCLA–which also have graduation rates above 90% and whose recent alumni typically earn about $50,000 a year.

Looking for this year’s Cinderella story? Manhattan (40th), the rightful winner of the play-in game against Hampton under our system, is predicted to oust undefeated Kentucky (389th) in the first round and go all the way to the Elite Eight. Another sixteen seed makes history in our bracket, as Lafayette College (28th) knocks off Villanova (114th) in the first round and hangs on until the Elite Eight as well.

There are some squeakers along the way. Schools within 20 places of each other in our ranking are roughly equivalent. But, strictly by our numbers, pricey, exclusive Lafayette edges out public and relatively affordable UC Irvine (32nd) in the Sweet 16 round. Lafayette Leopards tend to graduate into higher-paying jobs than do Irvine Anteaters (a difference of about $8,000 a year, according to Payscale), but they pay much more for their degrees. The average Leopard pays a total of $178,000 (after college scholarships are subtracted) for a bachelor’s degree, versus the Anteaters’ total bill of about $123,000.

Under our college value selection system, Brigham Young (9th) not only makes the roster of 64 teams but goes all the way to the Elite Eight before running up against unstoppable Harvard. Other notables in our bracket: Perennial basketball powerhouse Duke (32nd) barely makes it past Georgetown (37th) in the Sweet 16 before falling to UCLA. But high seeds like Gonzaga (177), Arizona (99), and Kansas (248) stumble early in the tournament.

To see how your college ranks in the competition of life, check out our full college rankings. Dig into our full NCAA bracket below (click the image to see a larger version).

MoneyBracket 3-18b

 

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