TIME Morning Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: March 26

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

In the news: Administration gives more time for some to sign up for Obamacare, Secret Service Agents sent home for drinking in Amsterdam, more clues for Malaysia Flight MH370, Snowden says proposed NSA reforms don't go far enough, and is the contraceptive mandate doomed?

  • “With less than a week left for people to sign up for health insurance, the Obama administration said Tuesday that it would allow more time for those who had tried to apply but were blocked by technical problems with the federal exchange.” [NYT]
  • “Just 39% of uninsured Americans know that the deadline to sign up for insurance under the health care reform law is less than a week away, according to a new poll.” [TIME] “The latest tracking poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation finds that, among uninsured adults, 43% don’t know when the deadline is or refused to answer. Five percent believe the deadline has already passed and 13% think it’s later this year.”
  • One-ship Ukraine Navy Defies Russia to the End [WSJ]
  • How to win the Cold War 2.0 [Politico Magazine]
  • “House lawmakers Wednesday will introduce new legislation aimed at curbing the growing violence along the U.S.-Mexico border that has left dozens of Mexicans, Americans, and others dead or injured as a result of murky use-of-force policies at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency.” [BuzzFeed]
  • “Three months after more than a million Americans lost their unemployment insurance benefits, the Senate is set to move on an extension later this week, with final passage expected next week. But as the Senate gets closer to passing an extension, the House’s position has not changed.”I told the president I would consider this, as long as it was paid for and as long as there were provisions attached that would actually help the economy and help people get back to work. Those conditions have not been met,” House Speaker John Boehner said Tuesday.” [National Journal]
  • “Edward Snowden said Tuesday that President Barack Obama’s proposed reforms to National Security Agency surveillance programs are a “turning point” for the country, but he added the proposal does not go far enough to protect Americans’ privacy.” [TIME]
  • Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 sent ‘partial ping’ that could aid search [WSJ]
  • “New satellite images taken three days ago show more than 100 objects — some as long as 75 feet — that may have come from the missing Malaysia Airlines jet, Malaysia’s defense minister Hishammuddin Hussein said on Wednesday.” [Washington Post]
  • Looks like the contraceptive mandate is doomed [Slate]
  • “Three Secret Service agents responsible for protecting President Obama in Amsterdam this week were sent home and put on administrative leave Sunday after going out for a night of drinking, according to three people familiar with the incident. One of the agents was found drunk and passed out in a hotel hallway, the people said.” [Washington Post]
  • The invisible primary: GOP preps as Chris Christie stumbles [Politico]

 

TIME Morning Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: March 25

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

In the News: Hobby Lobby case before Supreme Court and why the business lobby is ignoring it, Obama to propose curbing NSA data collection, the world through Putin's eyes, and is 2014 a tough year for Democrats?

  • Supreme Court to hear oral arguments in Hobby Lobby case Tuesday [NPR]
  • “The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday will tackle a pair of court cases that straddle some of the most charged topics in American politics. The cases could have ramifications for issues such as religious liberty, contraception, gay rights, employment discrimination, health-care reform and corporate personhood. In this smorgasbord of wedge issues, there’s something for every political faction to love or loathe — but some of the groups with the most at stake have been curiously silent.” [TIME]
  • How Hobby Lobby could expose SCOTUS hypocrisy [Salon]
  • “Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Republican of Washington, the highest-ranking woman in the House leadership and a rising star in the party, may have improperly used her House office staff and financial resources to help bolster her political career, the Office of Congressional Ethics has concluded.” [NYT]
  • “The 2016 Republican presidential primaries are still almost two years away, but the race is on for the support of one key donor: billionaire casino magnate Sheldon Adelson.” [TIME]
  • President Obama’s West Wing power trio [Politico]
  • “Suspended from the Group of Eight nations over its annexation of Crimea, Russia said Tuesday that it expects to participate in the next meeting of the Group of 20 nations, in Australia next November, despite warnings that it may not be welcome.” [Washington Post]
  • Looking at the world through Putin’s pupils [TIME]
  • “The Obama administration is preparing to unveil a legislative proposal for a far-reaching overhaul of the National Security Agency’s once-secret bulk phone records program in a way that — if approved by Congress — would end the aspect that has most alarmed privacy advocates since its existence was leaked last year, according to senior administration officials.” [NYT]
  • Numbers don’t lie, It’s a tough year for Democrats: “The numbers, geography, and timing for Senate Democrats have been challenging from the beginning of this election cycle. They have greater exposure, defending 21 seats compared with only 15 for the GOP. Even worse, the exposure comes in tough places for Democrats, who have four seats up in states that Mitt Romney carried by 15 percentage points or more, two in states that he won by 14 points, and another in a state Romney took by 2 points.” [National Journal]

 

 

TIME Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: March 24

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

In the News: Obama travels to Europe, Mitt Romney slams Obama on Russia, Jimmy Carter's NSA worries, Feinstein says she has the votes to reveal CIA report, Japan turning over nuclear stockpile to U.S., mudslides kill 8 in Washington state

  • Obama tries to reassure jittery allies on foreign trip [TIME]
  • 3 Presidents and a riddle named Putin: “For 15 years, Vladimir V. Putin has confounded American presidents as they tried to figure him out, only to misjudge him time and again. He has defied their assumptions and rebuffed their efforts at friendship. He has argued with them, lectured them, misled them, accused them, kept them waiting, kept them guessing, betrayed them and felt betrayed by them.” [NYT]
  • Mitt Romney on Obama: “Well, there’s no question but that the president’s naivete with regards to Russia, and his faulty judgment about Russia’s intentions and objectives, has led to a number of foreign policy challenges that we face. And unfortunately, not having anticipated Russia’s intentions, the president wasn’t able to shape the kinds of events that may have been able to prevent the kinds of circumstances that you’re seeing in the Ukraine, as well as the things that you’re seeing in Syria,” [CBS News]
  • Jimmy Carter believes NSA is reading his emails [TIME]
  • Michelle Obama praised for style, warmth in China [AP] Photos at Politico
  • “The Senate Intelligence Committee is poised to send a long-awaited report on the CIA’s interrogation practices to President Barack Obama’s desk for his approval — or redaction. Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) says she has the votes on the narrowly divided panel to publicly reveal the executive summary and key conclusions of a 6,300-page report on Bush-era interrogation tactics, a move sure to fuel the Senate’s intense dispute with the CIA over how the panel pieced together the study. That vote is likely to happen sometime this week.” [Politico]
  • Japan turning over nuclear stockpile to U.S. [The Hill]
  • “The legal battle over Obamacare’s contraception mandate is essentially tied as it heads into Tuesday’s Supreme Court arguments. Both sides have suffered some bad losses in lower courts, and the weaknesses that hurt them before could spell trouble again on Tuesday.The Court has combined two cases on the birth-control mandate—one the government won, and one it lost. Both challenges were filed by for-profit companies that say the mandate violates the religious beliefs of their owners…there are good reasons why each side might lose at the Supreme Court.” [National Journal]
  • “Political attacks on the Koch brothers have emerged as a key, practically everyday part of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and his Democratic Party’s 2014 election strategy — accusing the wealthy conservative donors of trying to buy elections and block aid to Ukraine.” [Fox News]
  • Nate Silver predicts GOP will win Senate Midterms [TIME]
  • Condoleeza Rice defends Senate candidate in crossroads Senate ad [National Journal]
  • “Thirty-two people were injured — none seriously — when an eight-car Chicago Transit Authority train continued through the end of the platform and struck the escalators leading to the terminals at O’Hare International Airport early Monday morning.” [NBC Chicago]
  • Eight dead, 18 missing after Washington state landslide [Reuters]

 

 

TIME Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: March 14

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

In the News: John Kerry, Sergey Lavrov meet in Russia; WH orders review of deportation practices; UI deal moving ahead in Senate; GM cars linked to 303 deaths; Metro-North Railroad safety report released; For-profit schools facing new rules

  • “U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Friday morning started talks with Russian foreign minister Sergey Lavrov in a diplomatic push to stop an intensifying crisis over Russia’s military presence in a southern region of Ukraine. But even as the two shook hands and met at the home of the U.S. ambassador in London, the rhetoric from Moscow continued to be harsh.” [Washington Post]
  • Warnings from the Ukraine Crisis [WSJ]
  • “A proposed U.S. aid package for Ukraine’s fledgling pro-Western government stalled Thursday amid festering Republican Party feuds over foreign policy.Tensions erupted on the Senate floor late in the day after the chamber did not advance the measure, with Sen. John McCain (Ariz.) berating the dozen or so of his Republican colleagues who, for various reasons, objected to the legislation.” [Washington Post]
  • White House reviewing deportation practices [TIME] and presenting new rules for for-profit schools [TIME]
  • “Senators struck a bipartisan deal on Thursday to revive expired long-term jobless benefits following months of dramatic stops and starts on the issue. After an afternoon of frantic negotiations, five senators from each party announced a deal that should finally deliver 60 votes necessary for the aid package to pass the Senate, barring procedural snags.” [Politico]
  • “The delegation from the National Cannabis Industry Association made a point of dressing well for its day on Capitol Hill, sporting mostly dark suits, lots of ties and plenty of the group’s signature lapel pins, which feature a sun rising over vibrant fields of marijuana.” [Washington Post]
  • “Kentucky’s state Senate voted unanimously Wednesday to advance a bill that allowing the use of marijuana oil to treat some cases of childhood epilepsy. Senate Bill 124, sponsored by state Sen. Julie Denton (R-Louisville), would exempt the marijuana extract cannabidiol from being classified as marijuana when used in Federal Drug Administration-approved studies, allowing children suffering from debilitating seizures to be treated as part of FDA trials. It would also approve use of the oil when recommended by a state research hospital.” [Huffington Post]
  • Putin on the Couch [Politico Magazine]
  • Democrats are addicted to Koch, too [National Journal]
  • Amid review of response to ignition failures, report finds 303 Deaths linked to GM cars with failed airbags [NYT]
  • Missing jet search area goes from ‘chessboard to football field’ as search expands to Indian Ocean [CNN]
  • Michael Bloomberg defends policies in interview with Katie Couric [Yahoo News]
  • Metro-North review finds “safety is lacking,” according to New York Times

 

TIME Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: March 13

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

In the News: Why the CIA, Senate feud was a long time coming, Republicans plan to up anti-abortion efforts in 2014, Holder endorses reduced drug sentencing proposal, Jan Brewer, and TIME's Ideas issue

  • Lawmakers optimistic about mortgage reform plan [TIME]
  • “The White House has been withholding for five years more than 9,000 top-secret documents sought by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence for its investigation into the now-defunct CIA detention and interrogation program, even though President Barack Obama hasn’t exercised a claim of executive privilege.” [McClatchy DC]
  • Holder endorses proposal to reduce drug sentences [NYT]
  • Public feud between CIA, Senate Panel follows years of tension over interrogation report [Washington Post]
  • “As the oldest current sitting senator, Feinstein, 80, may look like a sweet granny, but boy, is it a bad idea to cross her, something the Central Intelligence Agency is just learning. Feinstein, the first female chair of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, has often defended the CIA in the past on its surveillance tactics. But when the spy agency apparently used those same tactics against her, allegedly hacking her staff’s computers and stealing sensitive files, Feinstein was having none of it. Her speech taking the CIA to task on the floor of the Senate Tuesday morning was jaw dropping.” [TIME]
  • The un-American, anti-Koch campaign [Politico Magazine]
  • “Several anti-abortion lawmakers on Wednesday urged the GOP to focus on social issues this November and in 2016, arguing abortion rights supporters engage in ‘savagery.'” [The Hill]
  • Jan Brewer in 2016? [CBS News]
  • “U.S. investigators suspect that Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 stayed in the air for about four hours past the time it reached its last confirmed location, according to two people familiar with the details, raising the possibility that the plane could have flown on for hundreds of additional miles under conditions that remain murky.” [WSJ]
  • “In his first year in Rome, Pope Francis’ comments on everything from gays to atheists have gotten most of the attention, but his aggressive efforts to reform the Vatican’s scandal-scarred financial apparatus show he’s not all talk.” [NBC News]
  • 7 Killed by explosion in East Harlem [NYT]

What’s prettier in print: The new issue of TIME

TIME Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: March 12

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

In the News: Republican David Jolly wins Florida special election, What win means for 2014 midterms, Obama approval rating down, Malaysian flight updates (spoiler: still missing), Obama flexing executive muscle on extended pay

  • The (not very) quiet campaign for HIllary Clinton [TIME]
  • According to a new NBC/Wall Street Journal poll: “By a 33 percent to 24 percent margin, Americans say their vote will be to signal opposition to the president rather than to signal support, though 41 percent say their vote will have nothing to do about Obama” [NBC News]
  • “Former Republican lobbyist David Jolly will be laughing all the way to Washington after winning a special election on Tuesday to fill the congressional seat long occupied by Republican Representative Bill Young, his former boss who died in October.” [TIME]
  • Why a Republican wave in 2014 is looking more likely now [National Journal]
  • “The Florida special election Tuesday was supposed to be an ideal chance for Democrats to show that 2014 isn’t a lost year. Instead, they were dealt another body blow, further weakening their prospects for this year’s midterms. Democrats couldn’t have asked for a more golden opportunity.” [Politico]
  • Obamacare signups reach 4.2 million in February [LA Times]
  • From The Hill: “President Obama is hoping to use his executive authorities to require American businesses to pay millions of employees overtime pay, as part of a populist election-year push targeting income inequality by the White House.The president will direct the Labor Department on Thursday to revamp regulations governing which types of employees businesses can classify as “executive or professional,” and thus avoid paying overtime.”
  • “The top military officer tapped by the White House to lead the National Security Agency is facing a potentially rocky road toward Senate confirmation, as congressional frustration with U.S. intelligence is quickly reaching a boiling point over new claims that the CIA interfered with Senate-led oversight efforts.” [BuzzFeed]
  • Wanted by Ecuador, two brothers make a mark in U.S. campaigns [NYT]
  • Updates on missing Malaysian flight: “Government and military officials said the search for a missing Malaysian airliner could hinge on an unidentified radar path that suggested the plane might have inexplicably turned, crossed back across the mainland, and flown over the Malacca Strait, hundreds of miles off its scheduled flight path.” [Washington Post]
  • How a court secretly evolved on surveillance: “Ten months after the Sept. 11 attacks, the nation’s surveillance court delivered a ruling that intelligence officials consider a milestone in the secret history of American spying and privacy law. Called the “Raw Take” order — classified docket No. 02-431 — it weakened restrictions on sharing private information about Americans, according to documents and interviews.” [NYT]
  • New York Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand talks to TIME about running for President, sexual assault in the military and on college campuses, and why women should rule [TIME]
TIME Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: March 11

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

In the news: Florida special elections, President Obama 'Between Two Ferns', Malaysia flight, Colorado collects $2 million in recreational marijuana tax, report on Syria's children, and Ukraine

  • “Voters on Florida’s Gulf Coast head to the polls Tuesday to fill a vacant U.S. Congressional seat in a special election watched by both major parties for what it portends for November when all 435 congressional seats will be up for grabs.” [Reuters]
  • From Politico: “The stakes are particularly high for Democrats. The party has bet big on Alex Sink, Florida’s former chief financial officer and the Democrats’ 2010 gubernatorial nominee, in the race for the swing 13th Congressional District, which encompasses part of the St. Petersburg area. A win, Democrats hope, will deflate the conventional wisdom that 2014 is destined to go south for them.”
  • President Obama: Between Two Ferns [Funny or Die]
  • Senate easily passes McCaskill’s sexual assault bill [Washington Post]
  • Congress to investigate GM recall [WSJ]
  • “Today, 61% of Republicans and Republican leaners under 30 favor same-sex marriage while just 35% oppose it. By contrast, just 27% of Republicans ages 50 and older favor allowing gays and lesbians to marry.” [Pew Research]
  • Harry Reid plots to block potential 2016 foe [Politico]
  • “Thirty Senate Democrats are scheduled to stage an all-night talkathon to address climate change and its deniers, but notably missing from the extensive roster of speakers are moderate Democrats, especially those who are up for re-election in 2014. According to a list of participating senators provided by Democrats, the most politically vulnerable among them will not speak: Mark Begich of Alaska, Kay Hagan of North Carolina, Mary L. Landrieu of Louisiana, Mark Pryor of Arkansas and John Walsh of Montana.” [Roll Call]
  • Malaysia Airline Flight MH370: “The Malaysian police said on Tuesday that one of the two passengers known to have used stolen passports to board the missing Malaysian airliner was a 19-year-old Iranian who wanted to migrate to Germany and appeared to have no connection to terrorist organizations.” [NYT]
  • From TIME: “We’ve made no progress, we don’t have a clue,” Izhar Bahari, air traffic controller at Malaysia’s Department of Civil Aviation, tells TIME. He went on to deny an earlier report that the search has now shifted focus to the Strait of Malacca. “We focus our search both on the east and the west coast, and we will expand the areas for tomorrow.”
  • “The US Secretary of State has rejected a talks offer with Russian President Vladimir Putin until Moscow engages with US proposals on Ukraine’s crisis. John Kerry told his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov that Moscow’s military intervention in Crimea had made any negotiations extremely difficult.” [BBC]
  • “As Russia tightened its grip on Crimea, Ukraine’s ousted president appealed on Tuesday to the country’s military units to refuse to follow the orders of the new interim authorities, declaring that he remained commander in chief and would return to the country as soon as conditions permitted.” [NYT]
  • “The European Union told Russia it must switch course in Crimea by next week or risk more sanctions as Ukraine’s deposed president warned of a possible civil war.” [Bloomberg]
  • Syria’s Children Suffering, Dying Three Years into Conflict [NBC News]
  • “Colorado made roughly $2 million in marijuana taxes in January, state revenue officials reported Monday in the world’s first accounting of the recreational pot business.” [Fox News]
  • Prosecutors say D.C. mayor knew of ‘shadow campaign'; mayor says it’s all a lie [Washington Post]
  • “Pro-life groups say the Girl Scouts are selling something else along with their Thin Mints, Trefoils and Samoas: abortion.” [Politico Magazine]
TIME Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: March 10

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

In the News: Rand Paul on Putin, Inmates joining Obamacare, earthquake strikes Northern California coast, Boston gearing up for marathon, SuperPAC gearing up for Hillary

  • Sen. Rand Paul: “I wouldn’t let Putin get away with it” [TIME]
  • After big bet, hedge fund pulls levers of power: “Corporate money is forever finding new ways to influence government. But Mr. [William] Ackman’s campaign to take this fight “to the end of the earth,” using every weapon in the arsenal that Washington offers in an attempt to bring ruin to one company, is a novel one, fusing the financial markets with the political system.” [NYT]
  • The fine line the Obama Administration is walking with doctors and hospitals [National Journal]
  • Clinton Super PAC ‘Ready for Hillary’ gets readier [TIME]
  • Boston gearing up for safer marathon: “Plans call for thousands of uniformed and plainclothes police officers and federal agents along the 26.2-mile route, double the number of security personnel who usually man the race. Security checkpoints will be set up at the most popular spectator spots, and an array of new surveillance cameras along the route will send feeds to a beefed-up command center, officials said.”[WSJ]
  • For tribes, new Farm Bill revives old wounds [Politico]
  • Sen. McCaskill’s sexual assault bill is meatier than advertised [Washington Post]
  • Magnitude 6.9 earthquake struck off Northern California coast Sunday night [NBC News]
  • Five things we learned from CPAC [CNN]
  • Inmates and Obamacare: “In a little-noticed outcome of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, jails and prisons around the country are beginning to sign up inmates for health insurance under the law, taking advantage of the expansion of Medicaid that allows states to extend coverage to single and childless adults — a major part of the prison population.” [NYT]
  • U.S. Nuclear agency hid concerns, hailed safety record as Fukushima melted [NBC News]
  • Father of Sandy Hook killer searches for answers [New Yorker]
  • The battle to become the next Darrell Issa [Politico]
  • North Korea vote: a sham worth studying [TIME]
TIME Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: March 7

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

In the News: CPAC's 2016 Preview, Russia and Crimea solidify ties, University of California struggling with diversity, Unemployment rate at 6.7%

  • US employers sadd 175K jobs; unemployment rises to 6.7 percent [TIME]
  • CPAC gives Republicans a 2016 Preview [TIME]
  • “Russia and Crimea moved to solidify ties Friday as pro-Russia parties in Crimea planned campaigns for a referendum on splitting from Ukraine and Moscow enthusiastically greeted a visiting Crimean delegation.” [Washington Post]
  • “Nineteen House members sent a letter to Labor Secretary Tom Perez on Thursday pushing for “better inclusion of LGBT individuals” in the agency’s workplace programs. Other offices, led by Sen. Jeff Merkley, are preparing a letter from House and Senate members urging Obama to sign an executive order to ban federal contractors from discriminating against LGBT workers.” [BuzzFeed]
  • Rep. Darrell Issa apologizes to Rep. Elijah Cummings over handling of hearing [LA Times]
  • “Over the past week, a half-dozen Washington Republicans have described [Floridian candidate David] Jolly’s campaign against Democrat Alex Sink as a Keystone Cops operation, marked by inept fundraising, top advisers stationed hundreds of miles away from the district in the state capital and the poor optics of a just-divorced, 41-year-old candidate accompanied on the campaign trail by a girlfriend 14 years his junior. The sources would speak only on condition of anonymity.” [Politico]
  • “With the U.S. Supreme Court poised to rule on race-conscious college-admissions policies, University of California officials say they still struggle to meet diversity goals for their university system 18 years after state voters banned affirmative action.” [WSJ]
  • Army’s top prosecutor for sex crimes accused of sexual assault [CBS News]
  • Justice considers probe of Senate staffers in dispute over torture report [TIME]
TIME Must Reads

Morning Must Reads: March 5

Capitol
The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

In the news: EU proposes $15 billion aid package to Ukraine; U.S. takes training role in Africa; U.S. border patrol faces heat over use of lethal force; the winners and losers in Obama's budget; George P. Bush wins statewide race

  • “As Secretary of State John F. Kerry prepared to meet with his Russian counterpart in Paris, standoffs continued Wednesday between Russian and Ukrainian warships in this Crimean port with no sign of a breakthrough in a stalemate between the new government in Kiev and pro-Russian authorities in the Crimean Peninsula. In Brussels, the European Union weighed in Wednesday with a proposal to provide a $15 billion aid package of loans and grants to Ukraine in the coming years, on top of a U.S. announcement Tuesday of $1 billion in loan guarantees.” [WashPost]
    • The Standoff at Belbek: Inside the First Clash of the Second Crimean War [TIME]
    • “The House intelligence committee is ordering a review of the intelligence analysis leading up to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine after U.S. spy agencies last week concluded that Moscow would launch no such invasion.” [Daily Beast]
  • U.S. Takes Training Role in Africa as Threats Grow and Budgets Shrink [NYT]
  • Border Patrol Faces Heat Over Use of Lethal Force on Unarmed Immigrants [WSJ]
  • The Winners and Losers in Obama’s 2015 Budget [Hill]
  • “Half of all Americans believe that gay men and lesbians have a constitutional right to marry, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll in which a large majority also said businesses should not be able to deny serving gays for religious reasons.” [WashPost]
  • Fake Outrage in the Kentucky Senate Race [NYT]
  • George P. Bush wins statewide race [Politico]

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