TIME weather

Valentine’s Day ‘Snow Hurricane’ Hits New England

Just stay indoors with your Valentine already

A Valentine’s Day blizzard with hurricane-force winds was set to pummel much of New England on Saturday.

Blizzard warnings were issued in six states—Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York and Rhode Island—as the fourth major snowstorm of the season made its way toward the East Coast. Iat had already dumped eight inches in parts of Michigan by Saturday afternoon.

MORE: It’s Better to Be Single on Valentine’s Day

New York City and Philadelphia remained under winter weather advisories while Boston, which has already experienced a historic total of almost eight feet of snow this season, could get another foot. Parts of Massachusetts were forecasted to receive 18 inches, and Cape Cod could experience hurricane-force wind gusts.

The bottom line is, stay inside with your Valentine and don’t poke your head out until April. And if you’re single, you have a perfect excuse to do absolutely nothing.

TIME Know Right Now

Watch: What You Need to Know Right Now In Less Than 2 Minutes

These are today's top trending stories

In today’s trending stories, China and the U.S. have agreed to lower carbon emissions by 2030, which the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions calls an “extremely hopeful sign.”

Some 20,000 nurses in California are going on a two-day strike to protest the lack of protection in hospitals when it comes to Ebola treatment. Eighty-eight hospitals — 86 of which are owned by Kaiser Permanente — are to be affected.

And it may be November, but the midwest is facing an early bout of winter. Other parts of the U.S. can soon expect the same.

Finally, director Quentin Tarantino announced he may retire after his 10th film. Currently, he’s working on his eighth, titled The Hateful Eighth.

Watch today’s Know Right Now to find out more.

TIME weather

Winter is Here: See the First Major Snow Storm of the Season

An arctic blast slammed most of the midwest on Monday, ushering in the much-dreaded winter season

TIME weather

The Midwest Mayfly Invasion in 6 Photos (and a Gif)

A "massive emergence" of flying bugs


At about 8:45 p.m. Sunday the National Weather Service picked up this rather beautiful radar event, in which what registers as “light-moderate rain” seems to emanate from the Mississippi River between Wisconsin and Iowa and into Minnesota. But rain it was not. It was a swarm of mayflies. Gobs of mayflies. Piles and piles of mayflies.

July202014

The swarm lasted for a few hours and by the time it was over many a windshield and wall was caked in slimy bug carcasses. The swarm was blamed for a three-car pileup in Wisconsin that left one person hospitalized.

Scientists weren’t taken off guard by the event—it happens from time to time (a very similar “massive emergence” happened in June 2012) and is actually a sign of the health of the Mississippi. Mayflies gestate under water but once they mutate into winged creatures and rise from the depths they have one job and one job only—to make babies. The swarm seen in the radar above seems to move north because, like a weather system, it is carried that way in the wind.

The event, and others like it, amount to a feast for animals that feed on the mayfly orgy, making it a good time of year to be a bird or a fish—or the owner of a carwash, for that matter.

TIME Food & Drink

Kraft Recalls Velveeta Cheese Because It Doesn’t Have Enough Preservatives

Kraft Foods Warns Of Possible Velveeta Shortage
Scott Olson—Getty Images

In several Walmart stores around the country

If you were planning on doing your Velveeta shopping today, just a friendly heads up: Kraft Foods has recalled a batch that was shipped to Walmart stores around the Midwest, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The company said this particular batch of the pseudo cheese didn’t contain enough of the preservative known as sorbic acid, meaning it can spoil prematurely and possibly lead to food borne illness. The product was shipped to three Walmart distribution centers and could have been shipped to as many as 12 states: Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

The code on the package should read 021000611614, Kraft told the Associated Press. The containers will have a “Best Used By” date of Dec. 17, 2014.

Who knew sorbic acid was so crucial?

 

MONEY Autos

WATCH: Hail Yes! Car Dealers Slash Prices on Storm-Damaged Vehicles

Severe hailstorms in the West and Midwest have one benefit for bargain-hunters: Discounts on damaged cars.

TIME weather

Baseball-Size Hail Rains Down on Nebraska as Thunderstorms Inundate Midwest

Severe Weather
Nati Harnikā€”AP A car with its windows damaged by hail hangs over a creek following a severe thunderstorm in Blair, Neb., Tuesday, June 3, 2014.

Wild weather sweeps across the Midwest

Hard rain and hailstones inundated large swaths of the Great Plains on Tuesday as officials issued tornado watches in Nebraska that will continue late into the evening in the Cornhusker State.

“Storms may contain very heavy rain, large hail and a few tornadoes,” warned the National Weather Service in a bulletin posted on its website on Tuesday.

Baseball-size hail reportedly fell across northeast Nebraska on Tuesday, causing extensive damage.

The hail knocked out car windshields in affected areas, while the roof of at least one hotel in Missouri Valley, Iowa, was ripped off by high winds, according to CNN.

The National Weather Service predicted that another string of heavy thunderstorms is likely to move across the heartland from the Texas panhandle to western South Dakota on Wednesday.

TIME allan grant

Road Trip! Photos From US Route 30 in 1948

As summer approaches and the urge to hit the highways -- and the byways, and the back roads -- begins to take hold, LIFE offers a series of pictures from Nebraska and Wyoming made seven long decades ago.

In the summer of 1948, LIFE photographer Allan Grant set out on a trip from Omaha, Neb., toward Salt Lake City, Utah, traveling west through Nebraska and Wyoming along one of the most storied stretches in America: Route 30, part of the early transcontinental Lincoln Highway.

For reasons lost to time, none of Grant’s marvelous photos from that epic post-war road trip were ever published in LIFE. Here, as summer approaches and the urge to hit the highways — and the byways, and the back roads — begins to take hold, LIFE offers a whole series of Grant’s pictures from Nebraska and Wyoming made seven long decades ago, in tribute to the innate human desire to get up and go.

[MORE: “The Road Goes on Forever: Route 66 and the American Dream”]

[MORE: An unbelievably tricked-out ’47 Cadillac]

LIFE photographer Allan Grant clowns around during an assignment along Route 30, 1948.
Allan Grant—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images
TIME The Brief

Johnny Humble: Manziel Falls in Draft

Welcome to #theBrief, the four stories to know about right now--from the editors of TIME.

Here are the stories TIME is watching this Thursday, May 8:

  • Former Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel waited until the 22nd pick to hear the Cleveland Browns call his name at the 2014 NFL draft.
  • Fierce storms battered the Midwest with heavy winds, rain and hail as tornadoes touched down in Colorado and Minnesota.
  • Apple is reportedly close to a $3.2 billion acquisition deal with Beats Electronics, maker of famous Beats By Dre headphones.
  • Hello my baby, hello my honey. Scientists find 14 species of dancing frogs in India.

The Brief is published daily.

TIME Parenting

Stay-at-Home Moms: Not Who You Think They Are

Carey Kirkella; Getty Images

Forget the mommy wars, the real battle; for many stay at homes is just getting by.

The phrase Stay At Home Mother generally conjures up two images: the nice Midwestern mom with a car pool and a husband with a nine-to-five, or the highly educated former career woman now channeling all her hard-won achievement and scholarship into finding the exact right kind of juice box and organic cheese stick. But the data keeps suggesting that both these images are off the mark. Increasingly, the stay at home mother is beginning to look like a woman who doesn’t have too many other choices.

This is not to say that most stay at home moms are only staying home because they’re no good at anything else. Rather, it’s that an increasing proportion of the women looking after their kids full time are having a tough time of it. They can’t find well-paid work and they can’t find childcare that would make less than well-paid work worthwhile. Average weekly child care expenses rose more than 70% from 1985 to 2011, according to the Census Bureau. Wages, especially for women with only a high school education, did not rise at nearly that rate.

Of course there are some übermoms–women willingly reining in their considerable earning potential to look after their offspring. Who are they? Opt-out mothers, by Pew’s definition, have a postgraduate degree, an annual family income of more than $75,000, a working husband, and they say they are out of the workforce in order to care for their family. And despite all the media attention on these women, there aren’t very many of them. According to an analysis from Pew Research, a very, very small percentage of home-based mothers are highly educated and affluent. “Just 1% of the nation’s 35 million mothers ages 18 to 69 who are living with their children younger than 18,” are the so-called opt-out moms, notes Pew in analysis released on May 8.

In fact, only 4% of all stay-at-home moms are in this highly educated category. According to Pew, only about 10% of women with such qualifications decide to stay home. And almost 90% of those say they intend to return to work and historically 70% of them do, after about an average of two and a half years.

So let’s take stock: A tiny percentage of moms are extremely highly educated and affluent and have chosen to raise children full-time. Most of them are only stepping out of the workforce fleetingly. This is what all the cover stories and books have been about?

The other end of the stereotype—the midwestern mom with her traditional values—is also misleading. Guess which state has the lowest proportion of stay-at-home mothers? If you picked South Dakota, come to the front of the room and collect your prize. I know I didn’t. But according to an interesting study on the history of the working mother by Ancestry.com using Census data, 80% of mothers in the Mount Rushmore state work outside the home, the highest in the nation. Conversely, California has one of the lowest rates of working mothers: 62%.

Check where your state falls here:

So what are most stay-at-home mothers like? The Pew Report released a few weeks back paints a darker picture. A third of them were not born in the U.S. Half of them are not white. Almost half of them have a high school diploma or less, 20% are single mothers and 7% have husbands who were unemployed in the 12 months prior to 2012. More than a third of them live in poverty. Stay-at-home mothers’ education levels have risen across the board in the last 40 years, but the share of them living in poverty has more than doubled.

Most Americans still think that having a mother at home full-time and a father at work is the most optimal arrangement for raising a family. But increasingly, that arrangement is also becoming untenable or unrealistic. So next time you see a headline saying More Women Are Staying Home To Raise Kids,” you might want to brace yourself for what that story is really going to say.

 

 

 

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